4 explained how the workload is not too heavy
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The new semester will be starting in a few weeks, and I will be teaching a course which starts on the first day of the semester.

The goal of the course is to teach students how to use the R programming language to clean and analyze data. I will teach the course using a flipped classroom format:

  • To save time (both my own time and students' time), I will record video lectures and write lecture notes, which I expect the students to watch or read before each class. It should take the students about 1–2 hours to watch/read before class.

  • The class meets 1 time per week, for 3 hours at a time. During the class time each week, students will be in the computer lab, where they will complete data analysis tasks on the computer. During the class time in the lab, students can ask me to clarify any questions they may have.

Question: From the second class onward, I will be expecting students to watch the lecture videos and read the lecture notes before coming to class. However, is it a good idea to have the same arrangement for the first class? In other words, is it unreasonable to ask and expect students to read the lecture notes for the first class before coming to the first class? My plan is to post the lecture notes online, and to notify students that they should read the lecture notes by making an announcement using the course LMS system. (In my university, students are automatically signed up to the course learning management system when they register for the course.)

Some clarifications:

  • What types of students will be taking the course?

    The course is a course for undergraduate students, with most of the students are in their 2nd or 3rd year of study.

  • Is the course listed as a lab or as a lecture course?

    The course is listed as a lecture course. I am teaching in the business school, where lab courses are extremely uncommon. I believe that courses which are taught as lab courses, say by teaching them in a computer lab, are still listed officially as lecture courses.

  • Will I be giving the students too much work?

    In my university, courses meet once a week, for 3 hours at a time. My plan is to give students either some notes to read and/or videos to watch, which they should do before class each week. This should take about 1-2 hours of time each week, which seems to me to be quite reasonable. Students in my university take 5 courses a semester on average, which is 15 hours of class time each week.

The new semester will be starting in a few weeks, and I will be teaching a course which starts on the first day of the semester.

The goal of the course is to teach students how to use the R programming language to clean and analyze data. I will teach the course using a flipped classroom format:

  • To save time (both my own time and students' time), I will record video lectures and write lecture notes, which I expect the students to watch or read before each class. It should take the students about 1–2 hours to watch/read before class.

  • The class meets 1 time per week, for 3 hours at a time. During the class time each week, students will be in the computer lab, where they will complete data analysis tasks on the computer. During the class time in the lab, students can ask me to clarify any questions they may have.

Question: From the second class onward, I will be expecting students to watch the lecture videos and read the lecture notes before coming to class. However, is it a good idea to have the same arrangement for the first class? In other words, is it unreasonable to ask and expect students to read the lecture notes for the first class before coming to the first class? My plan is to post the lecture notes online, and to notify students that they should read the lecture notes by making an announcement using the course LMS system. (In my university, students are automatically signed up to the course learning management system when they register for the course.)

Some clarifications:

  • What types of students will be taking the course?

    The course is a course for undergraduate students, with most of the students are in their 2nd or 3rd year of study.

  • Is the course listed as a lab or as a lecture course?

    The course is listed as a lecture course. I am teaching in the business school, where lab courses are extremely uncommon. I believe that courses which are taught as lab courses, say by teaching them in a computer lab, are still listed officially as lecture courses.

The new semester will be starting in a few weeks, and I will be teaching a course which starts on the first day of the semester.

The goal of the course is to teach students how to use the R programming language to clean and analyze data. I will teach the course using a flipped classroom format:

  • To save time (both my own time and students' time), I will record video lectures and write lecture notes, which I expect the students to watch or read before each class. It should take the students about 1–2 hours to watch/read before class.

  • The class meets 1 time per week, for 3 hours at a time. During the class time each week, students will be in the computer lab, where they will complete data analysis tasks on the computer. During the class time in the lab, students can ask me to clarify any questions they may have.

Question: From the second class onward, I will be expecting students to watch the lecture videos and read the lecture notes before coming to class. However, is it a good idea to have the same arrangement for the first class? In other words, is it unreasonable to ask and expect students to read the lecture notes for the first class before coming to the first class? My plan is to post the lecture notes online, and to notify students that they should read the lecture notes by making an announcement using the course LMS system. (In my university, students are automatically signed up to the course learning management system when they register for the course.)

Some clarifications:

  • What types of students will be taking the course?

    The course is a course for undergraduate students, with most of the students are in their 2nd or 3rd year of study.

  • Is the course listed as a lab or as a lecture course?

    The course is listed as a lecture course. I am teaching in the business school, where lab courses are extremely uncommon. I believe that courses which are taught as lab courses, say by teaching them in a computer lab, are still listed officially as lecture courses.

  • Will I be giving the students too much work?

    In my university, courses meet once a week, for 3 hours at a time. My plan is to give students either some notes to read and/or videos to watch, which they should do before class each week. This should take about 1-2 hours of time each week, which seems to me to be quite reasonable. Students in my university take 5 courses a semester on average, which is 15 hours of class time each week.

3 clarified that the class only meets once a week
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The new semester will be starting in a few weeks, and I will be teaching a course which starts on the first day of the semester.

The goal of the course is to teach students how to use the R programming language to clean and analyze data. I will teach the course using a flipped classroom format:

  • To save time (both my own time and students' time), I will record video lectures and write lecture notes, which I expect the students to watch or read before each class. It should take the students about 1–2 hours to watch/read before class.

  • During theThe class meets 1 time per week, for 3 hours of contactat a time. During the class time each week, students will be in the computer lab, where they will complete data analysis tasks on the computer. During the class time in the lab, students can ask me to clarify any questions they may have.

Question: From the second class onward, I will be expecting students to watch the lecture videos and read the lecture notes before coming to class. However, is it a good idea to have the same arrangement for the first class? In other words, is it unreasonable to ask and expect students to read the lecture notes for the first class before coming to the first class? My plan is to post the lecture notes online, and to notify students that they should read the lecture notes by making an announcement using the course LMS system. (In my university, students are automatically signed up to the course learning management system when they register for the course.)

Some clarifications:

  • What types of students will be taking the course?

    The course is a course for undergraduate students, with most of the students are in their 2nd or 3rd year of study.

  • Is the course listed as a lab or as a lecture course?

    The course is listed as a lecture course. I am teaching in the business school, where lab courses are extremely uncommon. I believe that courses which are taught as lab courses, say by teaching them in a computer lab, are still listed officially as lecture courses.

The new semester will be starting in a few weeks, and I will be teaching a course which starts on the first day of the semester.

The goal of the course is to teach students how to use the R programming language to clean and analyze data. I will teach the course using a flipped classroom format:

  • To save time (both my own time and students' time), I will record video lectures and write lecture notes, which I expect the students to watch or read before each class. It should take the students about 1–2 hours to watch/read before class.

  • During the 3 hours of contact time each week, students will be in the computer lab, where they will complete data analysis tasks on the computer. During the class time in the lab, students can ask me to clarify any questions they may have.

Question: From the second class onward, I will be expecting students to watch the lecture videos and read the lecture notes before coming to class. However, is it a good idea to have the same arrangement for the first class? In other words, is it unreasonable to ask and expect students to read the lecture notes for the first class before coming to the first class? My plan is to post the lecture notes online, and to notify students that they should read the lecture notes by making an announcement using the course LMS system. (In my university, students are automatically signed up to the course learning management system when they register for the course.)

Some clarifications:

  • What types of students will be taking the course?

    The course is a course for undergraduate students, with most of the students are in their 2nd or 3rd year of study.

  • Is the course listed as a lab or as a lecture course?

    The course is listed as a lecture course. I am teaching in the business school, where lab courses are extremely uncommon. I believe that courses which are taught as lab courses, say by teaching them in a computer lab, are still listed officially as lecture courses.

The new semester will be starting in a few weeks, and I will be teaching a course which starts on the first day of the semester.

The goal of the course is to teach students how to use the R programming language to clean and analyze data. I will teach the course using a flipped classroom format:

  • To save time (both my own time and students' time), I will record video lectures and write lecture notes, which I expect the students to watch or read before each class. It should take the students about 1–2 hours to watch/read before class.

  • The class meets 1 time per week, for 3 hours at a time. During the class time each week, students will be in the computer lab, where they will complete data analysis tasks on the computer. During the class time in the lab, students can ask me to clarify any questions they may have.

Question: From the second class onward, I will be expecting students to watch the lecture videos and read the lecture notes before coming to class. However, is it a good idea to have the same arrangement for the first class? In other words, is it unreasonable to ask and expect students to read the lecture notes for the first class before coming to the first class? My plan is to post the lecture notes online, and to notify students that they should read the lecture notes by making an announcement using the course LMS system. (In my university, students are automatically signed up to the course learning management system when they register for the course.)

Some clarifications:

  • What types of students will be taking the course?

    The course is a course for undergraduate students, with most of the students are in their 2nd or 3rd year of study.

  • Is the course listed as a lab or as a lecture course?

    The course is listed as a lecture course. I am teaching in the business school, where lab courses are extremely uncommon. I believe that courses which are taught as lab courses, say by teaching them in a computer lab, are still listed officially as lecture courses.

    Question Protected by Alexandros
2 improved formatting, rewrote question to be more clear
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Is it unreasonable to expect students to read the lecture notes before attending the first class?

The new semester will be starting in a few weeks, and I will be teaching a course which starts in a few weekson the first day of the semester.

The goal of the course is to teach students To save time,how to use the R programming language to clean and analyze data. I would like to askwill teach the course using a flipped classroom format:

  • To save time (both my own time and students' time), I will record video lectures and write lecture notes, which I expect the students to watch or read before each class. It should take the students about 1–2 hours to watch/read before class.

  • During the 3 hours of contact time each week, students will be in the computer lab, where they will complete data analysis tasks on the computer. During the class time in the lab, students can ask me to clarify any questions they may have.

Question: From the second class onward, I will be expecting students to to watch the lecture videos and read the lablecture notes before before coming to the first class,. so that we can useHowever, is it a good idea to have the time insame arrangement for the first class efficiently.

Question:? IsIn other words, is it unreasonable to ask and expect students to read the lablecture notes for the first class before coming to the first class? My plan is to post the lecture notes online, and to notify students that they should read the lecture notes by making an announcement using the course LMS system. (In my university, students are automatically signed up to the course learning management system when they register for the course.)

Some relevant information:

Some clarifications:

  • The lecture notes are quite short. They are around 10 pages long, and it should take students at most 1–2 hours to read them.
  • My plan is to post the lecture notes online. I will make an announcement in the learning management system to notify the students that I expect them to read the lecture notes before coming to class.

    What types of students will be taking the course?

    The course is a course for undergraduate students, with most of the students are in their 2nd or 3rd year of study.

  • The course will be taught as a lab course, i.e., students will spend 3 hours each week in the computer lab learning basic computer programming and data analysis. Throughout the rest of the course, students will be expected to read the lab notes as a sort of "pre-lab" to prepare them to handle the material in the lab.

    Is the course listed as a lab or as a lecture course?

    The course is listed as a lecture course. I am teaching in the business school, where lab courses are extremely uncommon. I believe that courses which are taught as lab courses, say by teaching them in a computer lab, are still listed officially as lecture courses.

Is it unreasonable to expect students to read the lecture notes before the first class?

I will be teaching a course which starts in a few weeks. To save time, I would like to ask the students to read the lab notes before coming to the first class, so that we can use the time in the first class efficiently.

Question: Is it unreasonable to ask students to read the lab notes for the first class before coming to the first class?

Some relevant information:

  • The lecture notes are quite short. They are around 10 pages long, and it should take students at most 1–2 hours to read them.
  • My plan is to post the lecture notes online. I will make an announcement in the learning management system to notify the students that I expect them to read the lecture notes before coming to class.
  • The course will be taught as a lab course, i.e., students will spend 3 hours each week in the computer lab learning basic computer programming and data analysis. Throughout the rest of the course, students will be expected to read the lab notes as a sort of "pre-lab" to prepare them to handle the material in the lab.

Is it unreasonable to expect students to read the lecture notes before attending the first class?

The new semester will be starting in a few weeks, and I will be teaching a course which starts on the first day of the semester.

The goal of the course is to teach students how to use the R programming language to clean and analyze data. I will teach the course using a flipped classroom format:

  • To save time (both my own time and students' time), I will record video lectures and write lecture notes, which I expect the students to watch or read before each class. It should take the students about 1–2 hours to watch/read before class.

  • During the 3 hours of contact time each week, students will be in the computer lab, where they will complete data analysis tasks on the computer. During the class time in the lab, students can ask me to clarify any questions they may have.

Question: From the second class onward, I will be expecting students to watch the lecture videos and read the lecture notes before coming to class. However, is it a good idea to have the same arrangement for the first class? In other words, is it unreasonable to ask and expect students to read the lecture notes for the first class before coming to the first class? My plan is to post the lecture notes online, and to notify students that they should read the lecture notes by making an announcement using the course LMS system. (In my university, students are automatically signed up to the course learning management system when they register for the course.)

Some clarifications:

  • What types of students will be taking the course?

    The course is a course for undergraduate students, with most of the students are in their 2nd or 3rd year of study.

  • Is the course listed as a lab or as a lecture course?

    The course is listed as a lecture course. I am teaching in the business school, where lab courses are extremely uncommon. I believe that courses which are taught as lab courses, say by teaching them in a computer lab, are still listed officially as lecture courses.

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