4 Zenodo
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Treat your code as a preprint, that you can archive on a repository as green open access, so that you are in control of what gets attributed to you and under what terms. (Ideally you deposit before the final version of the work gets published, but you can always retrieve your original work and deposit it later.)

Pick whichever open source or free software license you prefer, preferably a copyleft one like GPL (see why in last paragraph). Use the git history to record the code made exclusively by you, either in a single version or multiple (e.g. the original version published in the articles, plus the reformatted one you were working on).

You can also deposit the whole repository on Zenodo, which will create a DOI for it. (Zenodo items can also have an embargo or other restrictions.)

Then tell the company to credit this newly created, self-standing artefact, and to follow its license. If you end up not liking what they produced, no problem: the git history shows what is actually your work. If you end up liking their work, you can incorporate or adapt it in your code thanks to the copyleft license, which forces them to use the same license.

Treat your code as a preprint, that you can archive on a repository as green open access, so that you are in control of what gets attributed to you and under what terms. (Ideally you deposit before the final version of the work gets published, but you can always retrieve your original work and deposit it later.)

Pick whichever open source or free software license you prefer, preferably a copyleft one like GPL (see why in last paragraph). Use the git history to record the code made exclusively by you, either in a single version or multiple (e.g. the original version published in the articles, plus the reformatted one you were working on).

You can also deposit the whole repository on Zenodo, which will create a DOI for it.

Then tell the company to credit this newly created, self-standing artefact, and to follow its license. If you end up not liking what they produced, no problem: the git history shows what is actually your work. If you end up liking their work, you can incorporate or adapt it in your code thanks to the copyleft license, which forces them to use the same license.

Treat your code as a preprint, that you can archive on a repository as green open access, so that you are in control of what gets attributed to you and under what terms. (Ideally you deposit before the final version of the work gets published, but you can always retrieve your original work and deposit it later.)

Pick whichever open source or free software license you prefer, preferably a copyleft one like GPL (see why in last paragraph). Use the git history to record the code made exclusively by you, either in a single version or multiple (e.g. the original version published in the articles, plus the reformatted one you were working on).

You can also deposit the whole repository on Zenodo, which will create a DOI for it. (Zenodo items can also have an embargo or other restrictions.)

Then tell the company to credit this newly created, self-standing artefact, and to follow its license. If you end up not liking what they produced, no problem: the git history shows what is actually your work. If you end up liking their work, you can incorporate or adapt it in your code thanks to the copyleft license, which forces them to use the same license.

3 More clear than "below"
source | link

Treat your code as a preprint, that you can archive on a repository as green open access, so that you are in control of what gets attributed to you and under what terms. (Ideally you deposit before the final version of the work gets published, but you can always retrieve your original work and deposit it later.)

Pick whichever open source or free software license you prefer, preferably a copyleft one like GPL for the reasons below(see why in last paragraph). Use the git history to record the code made exclusively by you, either in a single version or multiple (e.g. the original version published in the articles, plus the reformatted one you were working on).

You can also deposit the whole repository on Zenodo, which will create a DOI for it.

Then tell the company to credit this newly created, self-standing artefact, and to follow its license. If you end up not liking what they produced, no problem: the git history shows what is actually your work. If you end up liking their work, you can incorporate or adapt it in your code thanks to the copyleft license, which forces them to use the same license.

Treat your code as a preprint, that you can archive on a repository as green open access, so that you are in control of what gets attributed to you and under what terms. (Ideally you deposit before the final version of the work gets published, but you can always retrieve your original work and deposit it later.)

Pick whichever open source or free software license you prefer, preferably a copyleft one like GPL for the reasons below. Use the git history to record the code made exclusively by you, either in a single version or multiple (e.g. the original version published in the articles, plus the reformatted one you were working on).

You can also deposit the whole repository on Zenodo, which will create a DOI for it.

Then tell the company to credit this newly created, self-standing artefact, and to follow its license. If you end up not liking what they produced, no problem: the git history shows what is actually your work. If you end up liking their work, you can incorporate or adapt it in your code thanks to the copyleft license, which forces them to use the same license.

Treat your code as a preprint, that you can archive on a repository as green open access, so that you are in control of what gets attributed to you and under what terms. (Ideally you deposit before the final version of the work gets published, but you can always retrieve your original work and deposit it later.)

Pick whichever open source or free software license you prefer, preferably a copyleft one like GPL (see why in last paragraph). Use the git history to record the code made exclusively by you, either in a single version or multiple (e.g. the original version published in the articles, plus the reformatted one you were working on).

You can also deposit the whole repository on Zenodo, which will create a DOI for it.

Then tell the company to credit this newly created, self-standing artefact, and to follow its license. If you end up not liking what they produced, no problem: the git history shows what is actually your work. If you end up liking their work, you can incorporate or adapt it in your code thanks to the copyleft license, which forces them to use the same license.

2 timing
source | link

Treat your code as a preprint, that you can archive on a repository as green open access, so that you are in control of what gets attributed to you and under what terms. (Ideally you deposit before the final version of the work gets published, but you can always retrieve your original work and deposit it later.)

Pick whichever open source or free software license you prefer, preferably a copyleft one like GPL for the reasons below. Use the git history to record the code made exclusively by you, either in a single version or multiple (e.g. the original version published in the articles, plus the reformatted one you were working on).

You can also deposit the whole repository on Zenodo, which will create a DOI for it.

Then tell the company to credit this newly created, self-standing artefact, and to follow its license. If you end up not liking what they produced, no problem: the git history shows what is actually your work. If you end up liking their work, you can incorporate or adapt it in your code thanks to the copyleft license, which forces them to use the same license.

Treat your code as a preprint, that you can archive on a repository as green open access, so that you are in control of what gets attributed to you and under what terms.

Pick whichever open source or free software license you prefer, preferably a copyleft one like GPL for the reasons below. Use the git history to record the code made exclusively by you, either in a single version or multiple (e.g. the original version published in the articles, plus the reformatted one you were working on).

You can also deposit the whole repository on Zenodo, which will create a DOI for it.

Then tell the company to credit this newly created, self-standing artefact, and to follow its license. If you end up not liking what they produced, no problem: the git history shows what is actually your work. If you end up liking their work, you can incorporate or adapt it in your code thanks to the copyleft license, which forces them to use the same license.

Treat your code as a preprint, that you can archive on a repository as green open access, so that you are in control of what gets attributed to you and under what terms. (Ideally you deposit before the final version of the work gets published, but you can always retrieve your original work and deposit it later.)

Pick whichever open source or free software license you prefer, preferably a copyleft one like GPL for the reasons below. Use the git history to record the code made exclusively by you, either in a single version or multiple (e.g. the original version published in the articles, plus the reformatted one you were working on).

You can also deposit the whole repository on Zenodo, which will create a DOI for it.

Then tell the company to credit this newly created, self-standing artefact, and to follow its license. If you end up not liking what they produced, no problem: the git history shows what is actually your work. If you end up liking their work, you can incorporate or adapt it in your code thanks to the copyleft license, which forces them to use the same license.

1
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