4 added 308 characters in body
source | link

You do need to be very careful with authorship rules. According to many funding agencies in the US, the student doesn't own the data if you are in funded in the lab. It is the university who accepts the funds owns all of the data and the PI is the steward of the data. Your professor may be justified in requiring authorship given some of these rules. I would dig into this and find out the specifics before making a big claim about what you want to do. If you're not in the US, or even if you're in the US, I would check with your university's research or ethics offices. They will likely know the legality of data ownership that is implied by the granting agencies and help you know what you can and cannot do. I would suspect this data ownership rule is more similar than different when looking around the world.

But my advice is to just not fight it. Some battles are not worth it. This can be messy, and putting a name on a paper is a cheap fix. That's the safe and courteous way to handle what could possibly be legal issues due to data ownership.

Edit

There were some questions in comments, so here's more details. The primary resource is very dense, but most university research departments are pretty explicit about data ownership. At least the NIH and the NSF has this rule. A Good overview and quick summary of what counts are provided here. There was a pretty big case awhile ago where postdocs published without the data owner's consent, and it had to be retracted (this one is a very interesting data ownership case!). As you can see, ask your university research department, and if you don't know the specifics, assume you do not own any of the data.

You do need to be very careful with authorship rules. According to many funding agencies in the US, the student doesn't own the data if you are in funded in the lab. It is the university who accepts the funds owns all of the data and the PI is the steward of the data. Your professor may be justified in requiring authorship given some of these rules. I would dig into this and find out the specifics before making a big claim about what you want to do. If you're not in the US, or even if you're in the US, I would check with your university's research or ethics offices. They will likely know the legality of data ownership that is implied by the granting agencies and help you know what you can and cannot do. I would suspect this data ownership rule is more similar than different when looking around the world.

But my advice is to just not fight it. Some battles are not worth it. This can be messy, and putting a name on a paper is a cheap fix. That's the safe and courteous way to handle what could possibly be legal issues due to data ownership.

Edit

There were some questions in comments, so here's more details. The primary resource is very dense, but most university research departments are pretty explicit about data ownership. At least the NIH and the NSF has this rule. A Good overview and quick summary of what counts are provided here. As you can see, ask your university research department, and if you don't know the specifics, assume you do not own any of the data.

You do need to be very careful with authorship rules. According to many funding agencies in the US, the student doesn't own the data if you are in funded in the lab. It is the university who accepts the funds owns all of the data and the PI is the steward of the data. Your professor may be justified in requiring authorship given some of these rules. I would dig into this and find out the specifics before making a big claim about what you want to do. If you're not in the US, or even if you're in the US, I would check with your university's research or ethics offices. They will likely know the legality of data ownership that is implied by the granting agencies and help you know what you can and cannot do. I would suspect this data ownership rule is more similar than different when looking around the world.

But my advice is to just not fight it. Some battles are not worth it. This can be messy, and putting a name on a paper is a cheap fix. That's the safe and courteous way to handle what could possibly be legal issues due to data ownership.

Edit

There were some questions in comments, so here's more details. The primary resource is very dense, but most university research departments are pretty explicit about data ownership. At least the NIH and the NSF has this rule. A Good overview and quick summary of what counts are provided here. There was a pretty big case awhile ago where postdocs published without the data owner's consent, and it had to be retracted (this one is a very interesting data ownership case!). As you can see, ask your university research department, and if you don't know the specifics, assume you do not own any of the data.

3 added 825 characters in body
source | link

You do need to be very careful with authorship rules. According to many funding agencies in the US, the student doesn't own the data if you are in funded in the lab. It is the personuniversity who is funded,accepts the PI, whofunds owns all of the data. (At least and the NIH has this rule)PI is the steward of the data. Your professor may be justified in requiring authorship given some of these rules. I would dig into this and find out the specifics before making a big claim about what you want to do. If you're not in the US, or even if you're in the US, I would check with your university's research or ethics offices. They will likely know the legality of data ownership that is implied by the granting agencies and help you know what you can and cannot do. I would suspect this data ownership rule is more similar than different when looking around the world.

But my advice is to just not fight it. Some battles are not worth it. This can be messy, and putting a name on a paper is a cheap fix. That's the safe and courteous way to handle what could possibly be legal issues due to data ownership.

Edit

There were some questions in comments, so here's more details. The primary resource is very dense, but most university research departments are pretty explicit about data ownership. At least the NIH and the NSF has this rule. A Good overview and quick summary of what counts are provided here. As you can see, ask your university research department, and if you don't know the specifics, assume you do not own any of the data.

You do need to be very careful with authorship rules. According to many funding agencies in the US, the student doesn't own the data if you are in funded in the lab. It is the person who is funded, the PI, who owns all of the data. (At least the NIH has this rule). Your professor may be justified in requiring authorship given some of these rules. I would dig into this and find out the specifics before making a big claim about what you want to do. If you're not in the US, or even if you're in the US, I would check with your university's research or ethics offices. They will likely know the legality of data ownership that is implied by the granting agencies and help you know what you can and cannot do. I would suspect this data ownership rule is more similar than different when looking around the world.

But my advice is to just not fight it. Some battles are not worth it. This can be messy, and putting a name on a paper is a cheap fix. That's the safe and courteous way to handle what could possibly be legal issues due to data ownership.

You do need to be very careful with authorship rules. According to many funding agencies in the US, the student doesn't own the data if you are in funded in the lab. It is the university who accepts the funds owns all of the data and the PI is the steward of the data. Your professor may be justified in requiring authorship given some of these rules. I would dig into this and find out the specifics before making a big claim about what you want to do. If you're not in the US, or even if you're in the US, I would check with your university's research or ethics offices. They will likely know the legality of data ownership that is implied by the granting agencies and help you know what you can and cannot do. I would suspect this data ownership rule is more similar than different when looking around the world.

But my advice is to just not fight it. Some battles are not worth it. This can be messy, and putting a name on a paper is a cheap fix. That's the safe and courteous way to handle what could possibly be legal issues due to data ownership.

Edit

There were some questions in comments, so here's more details. The primary resource is very dense, but most university research departments are pretty explicit about data ownership. At least the NIH and the NSF has this rule. A Good overview and quick summary of what counts are provided here. As you can see, ask your university research department, and if you don't know the specifics, assume you do not own any of the data.

2 added 390 characters in body
source | link

You do need to be very careful with authorship rules. According to many funding agencies in the US, the student doesn't own the data if you are in funded in the lab. It is the person who is funded, the PI, who owns all of the data. (At least the NIH has this rule). Your professor may be justified in requiring authorship given some of these rules. I would dig into this and find out the specifics before making a big claim about what you want to do. If you're not in the US, or even if you're in the US, I would check with your university's research or ethics offices. They will likely know the legality of data ownership that is implied by the granting agencies and help you know what you can and cannot do. I would suspect this data ownership rule is more similar than different when looking around the world.

But my advice is to just not fight it. Some battles are not worth it. This can be messy, and putting a name on a paper is a cheap fix. That's the safe and curtiouscourteous way to handle what could possibly be legal issues due to data ownership.

You do need to be very careful with authorship rules. According to many funding agencies in the US, the student doesn't own the data if you are in funded in the lab. It is the person who is funded, the PI, who owns all of the data. (At least the NIH has this rule). Your professor may be justified in requiring authorship given some of these rules. I would dig into this and find out the specifics before making a big claim.

But my advice is to just not fight it. Some battles are not worth it. This can be messy, and putting a name on a paper is a cheap fix. That's the safe and curtious way to handle what could possibly be legal issues due to data ownership.

You do need to be very careful with authorship rules. According to many funding agencies in the US, the student doesn't own the data if you are in funded in the lab. It is the person who is funded, the PI, who owns all of the data. (At least the NIH has this rule). Your professor may be justified in requiring authorship given some of these rules. I would dig into this and find out the specifics before making a big claim about what you want to do. If you're not in the US, or even if you're in the US, I would check with your university's research or ethics offices. They will likely know the legality of data ownership that is implied by the granting agencies and help you know what you can and cannot do. I would suspect this data ownership rule is more similar than different when looking around the world.

But my advice is to just not fight it. Some battles are not worth it. This can be messy, and putting a name on a paper is a cheap fix. That's the safe and courteous way to handle what could possibly be legal issues due to data ownership.

1
source | link