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I would also like to add some aspects of choosing between US and EU groups as a postdoc. I have obtained two postdoc offers (in experimental physics) from both a European institute and a US university. They are both well-known in our field. When I was making the decision, I considered the following aspects:

Research style: In Europe, the research projects areseem to be more task-driven while there ismight be more freedom on studying unexpected phenomena in the US. As a goal is set, you will have to follow the timeline to achieve this goal. Moreover, US researchresearchers' style tends tomight be more "hands-on" than EU. Especially in experimental physics, you may have to fix a broken equipment or solder a circuit by yourself in the US. However, in EU, a team of technicians will take care of all the maintenance and refinement of the equipments. You do not have to know how to build a measurement setup as long as you know how to take data. As such, you may publish faster in EU. However, if your future goal is to be a faculty that you will ultimately set up your own lab, the "all by yourself" experience in the US may be a plus.

Funding: EUResearch funding situation in EU may generally have more research fundsbe better than the US, at least it is stably increasing but it strongly depends on fields and supervisors.

Group Culture: The European groups are usually huge that you maymight be just one among 30+ researchers/PhD students. It may require much more effort to take more responsibility in such a huge group and get noticed by the famous PI and even a good recommendation letter from the PI. In the US, the group sizes vary a lot. In most cases, you will be one out of zero to three postdocs. You are expected to have more responsibility like mentoring students, writing grant proposals and thinking new research plans, etc.

I would also like to add some aspects of choosing between US and EU groups as a postdoc. I have obtained two postdoc offers (in experimental physics) from both a European institute and a US university. They are both well-known in our field. When I was making the decision, I considered the following aspects:

Research style: In Europe, the research projects are more task-driven while there is more freedom on studying unexpected phenomena in the US. As a goal is set, you will have to follow the timeline to achieve this goal. Moreover, US research style tends to be more "hands-on" than EU. Especially in experimental physics, you may have to fix a broken equipment or solder a circuit by yourself in the US. However, in EU, a team of technicians will take care of all the maintenance and refinement of the equipments. You do not have to know how to build a measurement setup as long as you know how to take data. As such, you may publish faster in EU. However, if your future goal is to be a faculty that you will ultimately set up your own lab, the "all by yourself" experience in the US may be a plus.

Funding: EU may generally have more research funds than the US, but it strongly depends on fields and supervisors.

Group Culture: The European groups are usually huge that you may be just one among 30+ researchers/PhD students. It may require much more effort to take more responsibility in such a huge group and get noticed by the famous PI and even a good recommendation letter from the PI. In the US, the group sizes vary a lot. In most cases, you will be one out of zero to three postdocs. You are expected to have more responsibility like mentoring students, writing grant proposals and thinking new research plans, etc.

I would also like to add some aspects of choosing between US and EU groups as a postdoc. I have obtained two postdoc offers (in experimental physics) from both a European institute and a US university. They are both well-known in our field. When I was making the decision, I considered the following aspects:

Research style: In Europe, the research projects seem to be more task-driven while there might be more freedom on studying unexpected phenomena in the US. Moreover, US researchers' style might be more "hands-on" than EU. Especially in experimental physics, you may have to fix a broken equipment or solder a circuit by yourself in the US. However, in EU, a team of technicians will take care of all the maintenance and refinement of the equipments. You do not have to know how to build a measurement setup as long as you know how to take data. As such, you may publish faster in EU. However, if your future goal is to be a faculty that you will ultimately set up your own lab, the "all by yourself" experience in the US may be a plus.

Funding: Research funding situation in EU may be better than the US, at least it is stably increasing but it strongly depends on fields and supervisors.

Group Culture: The European groups are usually huge that you might be just one among 30+ researchers/PhD students. It may require much more effort to take more responsibility in such a huge group and get noticed by the famous PI and even a good recommendation letter from the PI. In the US, the group sizes vary a lot. In most cases, you will be one out of zero to three postdocs. You are expected to have more responsibility like mentoring students, writing grant proposals and thinking new research plans, etc.

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I would also like to add some aspects of choosing between US and EU groups as a postdoc. I have obtained two postdoc offers (in experimental physics) from both a European institute and a US university. They are both well-known in our field. When I was making the decision, I considered the following aspects:

Research style: In Europe, the research projects are more task-driven while there is more freedom on studying unexpected phenomena in the US. As a goal is set, you will have to follow the timeline to achieve this goal. Moreover, US research style tends to be more "hands-on" than EU. Especially in experimental physics, you may have to fix a broken equipment or solder a circuit by yourself in the US. However, in EU, a team of technicians will take care of all the maintenance and refinement of the equipments. You do not have to know how to build a measurement setup as long as you know how to take data. As such, you may publish faster in EU. However, if your future goal is to be a faculty that you will ultimately set up your own lab, the "all by yourself" experience in the US may be a plus.

Funding: EU may generally have more research funds than the US, but it strongly depends on fields and supervisors.

Group Culture: The European groups are usually huge that you may be just one among 30+ researchers/PhD students. It may require much more effort to take more responsibility in such a huge group and get noticed by the famous PI and even a good recommendation letter from the PI. In the US, the group sizes vary a lot. In most cases, you will be one out of zero to three postdocs. You are expected to have more responsibility like mentoring students, writing grant proposals and thinking new research plans, etc.