2 edited body
source | link

Messy code affects reproducibility

You tried to reproduce their results with the linked code, and were unable to do it. While you imply that you were ultimately able to develop your own code and replicate the results, I argue that badly written code affects reproducibility. In computer programming, this can be even more important, as programming languages don't necessarily have very long lives. Who knows if Magma or any other language will be common knowledge in 50 years.

In the long view, reproducibility is the most important part of the scientific endeavour. Proof that doing aa results in bb, somethinga fact that can be re-proven by anyone who cares to try, is an axiomatic building block upon which further scientific results can stand.

If reproducibility is important, then there is nothing wrong with telling them to clean up their code. Frankly, if their code is as bad as you describe, it sounds like the authors will have trouble understanding their own work going back to it in a few years. In that case, butby forcing them to learn a bit about writing nice code, you'd be doing them a favor.

Messy code affects reproducibility

You tried to reproduce their results with the linked code, and were unable to do it. While you imply that you were ultimately able to develop your own code and replicate the results, I argue that badly written code affects reproducibility. In computer programming, this can be even more important, as programming languages don't necessarily have very long lives. Who knows if Magma or any other language will be common knowledge in 50 years.

In the long view, reproducibility is the most important part of the scientific endeavour. Proof that doing a results in b, something that can be re-proven by anyone who cares to try, is an axiomatic building block upon which further scientific results can stand.

If reproducibility is important, then there is nothing wrong with telling them to clean up their code. Frankly, if their code is as bad as you describe, it sounds like the authors will have trouble understanding their own work going back to it in a few years. In that case, but forcing them to learn a bit about writing nice code, you'd be doing them a favor.

Messy code affects reproducibility

You tried to reproduce their results with the linked code, and were unable to do it. While you imply that you were ultimately able to develop your own code and replicate the results, I argue that badly written code affects reproducibility. In computer programming, this can be even more important, as programming languages don't necessarily have very long lives. Who knows if Magma or any other language will be common knowledge in 50 years.

In the long view, reproducibility is the most important part of the scientific endeavour. Proof that doing a results in b, a fact that can be re-proven by anyone who cares to try, is an axiomatic building block upon which further scientific results can stand.

If reproducibility is important, then there is nothing wrong with telling them to clean up their code. Frankly, if their code is as bad as you describe, it sounds like the authors will have trouble understanding their own work going back to it in a few years. In that case, by forcing them to learn a bit about writing nice code, you'd be doing them a favor.

1
source | link

Messy code affects reproducibility

You tried to reproduce their results with the linked code, and were unable to do it. While you imply that you were ultimately able to develop your own code and replicate the results, I argue that badly written code affects reproducibility. In computer programming, this can be even more important, as programming languages don't necessarily have very long lives. Who knows if Magma or any other language will be common knowledge in 50 years.

In the long view, reproducibility is the most important part of the scientific endeavour. Proof that doing a results in b, something that can be re-proven by anyone who cares to try, is an axiomatic building block upon which further scientific results can stand.

If reproducibility is important, then there is nothing wrong with telling them to clean up their code. Frankly, if their code is as bad as you describe, it sounds like the authors will have trouble understanding their own work going back to it in a few years. In that case, but forcing them to learn a bit about writing nice code, you'd be doing them a favor.