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I recall a teacher of mine saying : "Dealing with different cultures is dealing with different expectations", and calling someone by his title or his first name is definitely related to customs.

Being a French (from Chinese parents) student myself, I have never called my teachers/professors by their first names, but things tend to change just as customs evolve. Maybe it is because of my chinese backgrounds, which implies a strong use of titles (even for family members) that is explained by the importance of respect for the elders in the society.

Then I got to study in Oslo for a few months, and people explicitly asekdasked me to call them by their first names, which I did later. However, it still feels akward for me to call someone by his first name when he is "much" more older than me.

Now what I do is that I say "Monsieur" or "Madame", and use the first name if I am invited to do so.

I recall a teacher of mine saying : "Dealing with different cultures is dealing with different expectations", and calling someone by his title or his first name is definitely related to customs.

Being a French (from Chinese parents) student myself, I have never called my teachers/professors by their first names, but things tend to change just as customs evolve. Maybe it is because of my chinese backgrounds, which implies a strong use of titles (even for family members) that is explained by the importance of respect for the elders in the society.

Then I got to study in Oslo for a few months, and people explicitly asekd me to call them by their first names, which I did later. However, it still feels akward for me to call someone by his first name when he is "much" more older than me.

Now what I do is that I say "Monsieur" or "Madame", and use the first name if I am invited to do so.

I recall a teacher of mine saying : "Dealing with different cultures is dealing with different expectations", and calling someone by his title or his first name is definitely related to customs.

Being a French (from Chinese parents) student myself, I have never called my teachers/professors by their first names, but things tend to change just as customs evolve. Maybe it is because of my chinese backgrounds, which implies a strong use of titles (even for family members) that is explained by the importance of respect for the elders in the society.

Then I got to study in Oslo for a few months, and people explicitly asked me to call them by their first names, which I did later. However, it still feels akward for me to call someone by his first name when he is "much" more older than me.

Now what I do is that I say "Monsieur" or "Madame", and use the first name if I am invited to do so.

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I recall a teacher of mine saying : "Dealing with different cultures is dealing with different expectations", and calling someone by his title or his first name is definitely related to customs.

Being a French (from Chinese parents) student myself, I have never called my teachers/professors by their first names, but things tend to change just as customs evolve. Maybe it is because of my chinese backgrounds, which implies a strong use of titles (even for family members) that is explained by the importance of respect for the elders in the society.

Then I got to study in Oslo for a few months, and people explicitly asekd me to call them by their first names, which I did later. However, it still feels akward for me to call someone by his first name when he is "much" more older than me.

Now what I do is that I say "Monsieur" or "Madame", and use the first name if I am invited to do so.