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9

Declining coauthorship is actually quite common behavior in my field (mathematics). It is so common that not lightly do I question its ethics. In most instances I have seen it appears rather borderline, or the ethical questions that it raises are accounted for in other ways by the profession. However, taken to the extreme I think it would certainly result ...


8

It seems to me that if authors B and C write in the acknowledgment section that the contribution of person A was sufficiently important that they think A should be listed as an author but that A declined and especially if authors B and C provide a description of the reasons leading to A's refusal which is satisfying to A, in other words if B and C report ...


4

I think that you need to distinguish between the case when everyone agrees that X's work requires acknowledgement as a co-author, but X is being difficult, and the case where X is uncertain or dismissive of the level of their contribution. I was recently added, at the invitation of the primary authors, to the author list of an article in preparation based ...


7

The only mechanism is that being found out is typically both rather embarrassing and, in case of pre-tenure researchers, can also be very detrimental to career development of the researchers in question. Further, note that being found out is in many fields not as unlikely as you might think. For many more narrow topics, there are only so many researchers ...


2

Based on the names I recognize on the program committee, yes, it's probably a good conference. As for which conference will given you better visiblity: Neither! The two conferences attract slightly different audiences. Which audience do you want to impress more? Which audience (extrapolating from PC members and last year's accetd authors) are you more ...


4

You should definitely contact your former supervisor. If you do not have his contact information yourself, then you could try asking colleagues at your institution - such as a professor in the same research group. While authorship norms do vary by field, the supervisor's contribution (having the original idea, defining the project, helping you in general) ...


0

This depends entirely on the journal's style. They should provide a LaTeX class or template that explicitly identifies how to include the corresponding author's contact info, or if not that, a web page with instructions on how to include contact information. Without knowing which journal you're talking about, I don't think I can say anything more than that.


13

This varies substantially, depending on the sort of book, how well the author negotiated (each book involves an individually negotiated contract), the price of the book, etc. Based on one Springer contract I'm familiar with, here's a first approximation. I can't say for sure how representative it is, but it's at least one data point, and I'd guess it's ...


12

Research monographs in mathematics certainly exist, but they aren't the standard form of publication. They are generally not as prestigious as papers in strong mainstream journals, they may be less widely read, and they may be viewed as being less carefully refereed. Some important work in mathematics has first been published in monograph form, but I ...


0

I would like to add the following: If there are other, more experienced, persons in the specific field, who would likely do a better job than himself, perhaps it is best for him, for the sake of all the potential readers of the book, to decline the invitation and recommend these other people instead. An invitation is something that is unexpected, and ...


8

How could I submit it? The length guidelines are generally for maximum length. You can submit a "long paper" that is shorter than the maximum length allowed for a long paper. I've published papers 25% under limit without any comments from reviewers on the length. If there is enough original research content for consideration as a full paper, you ...


17

Yes, this is different from being accepted for publication (instead, it's closer to not rejected). It means they might publish it soon, they might publish it at some point further in the future, and they might not publish it at all. I have no idea what the statistics are, and they may vary depending on the current editor in chief. Here's some background: ...


4

When I get an invitation to contribute a book chapter (or conference paper in an invited session), I usually ask myself the following questions: Can I have a reasonable contribution ready for the proposed submission deadline? Is the venue I am invited to a good fit and does it provide the best possible visibility for my contribution? Do I want to invite ...


7

It almost certainly won't earn you any money. It probably won't be read by many people. It will be cited by even fewer. The collaboration may lead to future projects together. It may involve a lot of work. You might enjoy the process. Or hate it. It may or may not help your career progression, depending on your field, your career to date, and the posts ...


1

To give this an answer: Yes, it is posisble that you are again asked to make major revisions. It's completely up to the editor to decide how many rounds of revisions are appropriate. There's not a fixed number for all the publisher's journals. You'll have to ask someone in your field, ideally someone who's published in that journal before. But it also ...


2

Your question doesn't specify how well-adapted the proposed research is to the particular public-health professor you've contacted. I think this is a key issue. Let me explain: Most academics have broad training, some expertise across a wide range of areas, and then are true masters (in some cases, the top ones in the world) in a much smaller range of ...


3

Many universities now have institutional open access policies. Most of those policies assert a non-exclusive license to distribute research authored by university employees. Does the university's pre-existing non-exclusive license remain in effect when a restrictive copyright transfer agreement is later signed? This has been considered in great detail by ...


5

Many professors take a while to respond to emails. I would give it at least a week before you follow up with her. When you do send a reminder, keep it brief and polite, and send it as a forward of your previous email, so she won't have to go searching for your other message. Reminding her of why you think the paper is valuable could be a good strategy--if ...


26

To answer the (original version of the) question in the title: Are scientific articles of public domain? the answer is absolutely not, unless the relevant copyright holders declared it so or that its copyright has expired. Note that public domain is emphatically different from open access. To answer the question in the body: Is it legal for the ...


10

To answer the question in the title: free access to an article depends largely on the version. It's almost always fine to post versions on your institutional page. Some journals do have embargo periods, during which you must refrain from doing so. Depending on the field and journal, authors may post one of the following on their institutional website: ...


2

As others have pointed out, there is almost certainly no way to change your name in already published papers. In line with the previous answer, I would like to call your attention to initiatives like ORCID and ResearcherID that aim at creating unique identifications for each researcher, so you can collect all your scientific output under a single ID, more or ...


8

You follow the publisher's instructions. If your target journal asks for CMYK, you give them that. If they ask for RGB, you give them that. If they (are one of the few IME that) express no preference, then have a think about whether the charts will be viewed more on screen (use RGB) or printed on 4-colour printers (use CMYK).


5

Yes it definitely can be done. If you have an idea then do a literature review of the subject and if you have a contribution that builds on the activity in one of the journals you find then publish there. Perhaps also look into doing a conference paper first. See here for the difference between the two. The best co-author for your case would probably be a ...


9

By attacking your own proof even stronger than the others do. Seriously, there is a reason why people in your discipline haven't been able to find the answer for centuries. The a priori probability that you are wrong is so high that even when you have created a good looking proof, the a posteriori probability that you are right is way too low. This means ...


2

While most of the answers seems to have much confidence in the academic system, I would like to offer another viewpoint. I think it is in fact much harder for an unknown (to a specific field) to present a solution to the scientic community than normally expected. Scientists do screw up and sometimes royally. First example: The infamous Monty Hall problem. ...


44

First, make sure you are not really a crank before trying to convince others. Read these common characteristics of cranks. If they apply to you then get professional help. For the rest of the answer I will assume that you have really solved a famous open problem. In the following "he" refers to a typical non-expert claiming to have a solution for a ...


4

Leslie Lamport details his history of publishing, including the Paxos paper, on his website. It took eight or so years to publish the Paxos paper. Lamport received the Turing Award in 2013; and Paxos and its derivatives are now at the core of almost all large-scale web-sites (Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Netflix, ... ).


3

The answer is Yes, because I did this, and was actively encouraged to do so. Your supervisor does not own you. If you did some outside work, and you think it's publishable, and your supervisor wasn't involved, the work wasn't building off their lab's work or using their equipment, there's no reason they need to be involved. Now, you might want to involve ...


1

Is your advisor supporting you, e.g. as an RA? If so, he might be perturbed that you are spending time and energy on something "way different" from what you are paid to do. Along the same lines, he may also be intent on your completion of your degree program in a timely manner so that he can free up resources, say for another student to enter the group ...


3

Despite what people will say it is true that journals will reject papers using author profiling without a proper review. It is hard to say how many papers are rejected this way but Elsevier say that they reject 30 to 50 percent of papers without a review for other "technical reasons". See also this paper about how editors can save time by looking at author ...


20

May I add to Nate Eldredge's comprehensive answer that, if your work shakes or shatters the commonly held views in your community, then it is very important that you reconcile those views with yours, by which I mean: show exactly where the community is "wrong" or "not exactly right" and why. Offer counterexamples, predictions, all you can. Relativity ...


127

Your question has some issues. Given some of the questions you have asked on other SE sites in the last few days, I have some reservations about whether your question is being asked in good faith, but taken on its own merits it is a reasonable question so I will try to answer it. The main issue is that, even in asking this relatively simple question, your ...


6

Some advice is to very carefully check that the proofs are correct, ask one's supervisor for advice, and seek third opinions. Perhaps the supervisor has colleagues in the research area who would be willing to read the draft and offer concrete feedback. If the journal submitted to is good, yet the reviewers did not give any useful feedback at all, then there ...


43

What does your advisor say about all this? If she really believes you have solved this major problem, she should be moving mountains to help you publish and disseminate it. (It sounds like her name is on it too, so she has an even greater incentive.) But you've used the rather lukewarm phrasing that she "accepts" it. Better get her completely on board ...


87

Regardless of whether the work is correct or not, the following statement applies: The burden of proof is on the author to convince the reader of the result. The community (e.g., editors, reviewers) has no responsibility to evaluate your work to your satisfaction. If the reviewers made a good faith effort to read your paper and were not convinced, then you ...


47

If your interpretation of events is: "I have a heartbreaking work of staggering genius and the only obstacle to acceptance is that I am not well known and the elites are blocking my work", then you're unlikely to get good advice on what to do here or elsewhere. The problem, as Raphael indicates, is that while it's possible that this interpretation is ...


1

Yes. It is quite easy to do, once you know how. First, go to the References tab, then click on Insert Citation and Add New Source. Next, fill out the information as appropriate. When you want your References List produced, go to Bibliography. This is extremely helpful when you need to change some detail (say publication date) and you have many ...


23

First of all, see if the book has a newer edition, and try to look at a copy and see if it corrects the error. If not, then try to find: The publisher's web page for the book The author's professional web page, which hopefully has some mention of the book. An unofficial errata list (google the book's title and "errata" or "corrections"). Check in both ...


17

No. It is considered unethical in the academic community to submit a paper for simultaneous review at multiple venues (unless it is explicitly permitted by the publications, and you disclose this on submission). The IEEE guidelines on multiple submission prohibit multiple simultaneous submissions: Authors should only submit original work that has ...


1

Short answer is yes, but it is unethical. Even when you read the agreement before submitting your paper it appears that the work should be original, that means that it should have not been submitted to other conference or journal. You must put in the shoes of the reviewers, in one hand you make them waste time by reviewing one paper that is already being ...


1

Now that you have started the field of Algebraic General Topology you may want to convince other people that it is worth their while to learn about it. Looking through the slides I see lots of words whose definitions I do not know. I have not read your paper and I am ignorant of the terminology in the fields you are generalizing. Perhaps there are theorems ...


4

Usually the journal will host the videos as supplementary material, but if you want to host it externally, there are options. For example, figshare (see also this blog post).


4

This is a problem that is beginning to be recognised, and has been described by some as a "crisis of reproducibility". There have been examples of papers in prominent journals being withdrawn after bugs were found in the researchers' code. This article describes some of the problems in more detail. In my view there are three primary paths to addressing it, ...


4

If a person receives an invitation, the responsibility to deliver will be with that person. That does not necessarily mean that person will be first author although I suspect it will most frequently be the case. There are many posts on academia.sx that deal with first authorships so I do not think I need to replicate many good answers here. Suffice it to say ...



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