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7

Ask your professor to introduce you to a suitable expert. If some of your professors think that your work is of substantial quality and probably novel, then they are surely fine with introducing you to some suitable researchers in the field. Note that, for example, a postdoc in the respective field may suffice. They should be willing to give your work the ...


1

First of all, Im not a mathematician but I am in a closely related field (CS) I work in the machine learning domain and sometimes I read mathematical papers to find hints of my problem so I think I may able to provide a little help. According to my experience, the most different part in Maths to the other domain is that, their main results, are always a ...


3

In my discipline (political science), one would typically do both. Write an applied article that uses the software for an actual research project and submit that to a substantive journal. Then, separately, describe the software and write it up for a software journal (e.g., Journal of Statistical Software, R Journal, etc.).


1

The traditional review process is a communication between the editor, who have solicited reviewers to obtain critical peer review of the manuscript, and the author. As such you should respond to the editor and provide a response to the review comments by the reviewers. It is not likely the reviewers will see your response unless they agreed to re-review your ...


1

Instead of acknowledging him, you can dedicate the paper to him. I fully agree with @anonymous mathematician that acknowledgment has another purpose. Dedicating to a paper to a famous professor for her/his birthday, however, is not that uncommon and in spirit, I feel it closer to your intentions.


0

I usually address the editor since I don't ever communicate with the reviewers. However, I thank them for the report in the first sentence of the letter. I think that this corresponds well to the way how reports are written, because they are impersonal as well (they don't begin with Dear authors). However, In my opinion, while one should keep a good level ...


2

One thing to do is to write two documents: a short letter to the Editor, summarizing your rebuttal in a few sentences; a detailed Answer to Reviewers, including line-by-line response to all comments and suggestions of the Referees. Note that the Editor not necessarily has enough time to read through all the detailed response him/her-self, but the ...


1

Generally you address all letters to the editor (she/he is the contact person!) and if any part of your letter is relevant to a review, than you address them, too. In practice generally t means that in the main header I address on the editor, and when I answer the reviewers, I address them there.


0

Are the specific values really, really meaningful and relevant? Do they have meaning outside of the sandbox? Are you, for example, publishing new measurements of fundamental constants? No? Then, most likely, the actual numbers have no business being in your article extended abstract. My rationale is: you are telling a story. Elements that don't serve to ...


4

Not necessarily. Some journals only state dates for submission and acceptance. In such cases dates for revisions are not mentioned. Since it is not uncommon, at least in fields with which I am familiar, for papers to go through two (or sometimes more) revisions, a date for revision usually refers to only one, the first set of revisions. I can also confirm ...


2

Yes, it should mean the paper was accepted with no substantive changes. Otherwise, it would say something like "revised June 1, 2013" in between the submission and acceptance dates. If there were several revisions, then only the final revision date is recorded. In my experience, journals can be a little sloppy about this and allow small changes (such as ...


1

With many, perhaps most) journals it is possible to add materials,often referred to as Supplementary Material or Supporting Information or something similar. This can be word files, powerpoint files, excel files (or equivalents), media files (sound, movies, animations) containing material that support the article but cannot be accommodated within the usual ...


1

Elsevier journals now offer AudioSlides, short, webcast-style presentations that are shown next to the online article on ScienceDirect. This format gives authors the opportunity to present their research in their own words, helping readers to quickly understand what a paper is about and appreciate its relevance. Hopefully this is what you're looking ...


2

I'm new to this stack exchange, so I can't comment. I asked the same question here: MathOverflow: Is there an arXiv for Beamer presentations of scientific work? Someone suggested I look on this forum, and then I found the question was already asked. Basically I'm also curious if there's a reputable journal that publishes the slides from research ...


1

It surely depends on the field we are talking about. In medicine the number method now is the standard, probably because it improves overall readability of the text. Important references are often cited literally ("Smith et al. demonstrated that... [58]") and general statements by a collection of other researchers ("Many workgroups found...[23-27,57,89]). ...


0

Readers and listeners tend to read without no more that 16 or about items on the figure during presentation, so a good table should not be larger that 4x4 or about. This is relatively small size. Use plots if you need to present more data.


3

I would check a few articles of the journal you publish in and look at what other author are putting in their biography. Mostly it will be about your degrees (BSc, MSc, PhD, when and where), the field of research you are interested in and what is your current occupation. In summary you can state anything that shows your experitise in the subject you are ...


10

I believe the PI does not qualify for authorship. However, there is nothing to be lost by a little civility. You could send him a note - something like this (fill in the blanks) Dear Professor <name> I hope you are well. It has been <some time> since I moved from <old institution> to <your current institution>, and I am settling ...


2

In addition to the other answers, I think it depends on how much data you are trying to show. Personally, I like to use tables when I can. If you have only three data points, a figure wastes a lot of space and ink. Tufte calls this the Data-ink ratio. In his book, he recommends: Above all else, show the data. So, if you have hundreds of data ...


2

I find that in many cases, either a table or a plot will do an equally good job of presenting numeric information. Strictly speaking, a plot does NOT present numerical information because it is just a picture. The purpose of a plot is to show geometrical form of some dependence(s) when this form is important. It is impossible to recover original ...


2

If you are able to do it, use plots, period. What little purpose tables used to have is currently best served by online supplementary material, either on the journal's website or your own. If you have more than a couple of constants/data points (which would not require a table either), numbers are very difficult to read and (good) plots are much better for ...


11

As @Dirk says, it's often quite useful to preserve the numeric values - that's the motivation for tabulating data. However, plots have the advantage of being able to easily visualize trends in data. If you have a set grid of x and y co-ordinates, with each pair of co-ordinates having a numeric value, you can sort of do both. Here is an example. The trends ...


33

I would say: Use tables if the actual values are of importance and use plots if trends (or similar things) are important. The rationale is simply that one cannot extract actual values of a function at specific places from plot. Vice verse its much simpler to see linear growth or periodicity from a plot than from a table.


0

In math/CS you mostly use [1,2] or [Lot02,Zai04]. You can choose (unlike what most other answers impose) either of them, note for instance that both amsplain and amsalpha exist and either of them can be used in AMS publications. It's a matter of habits which style the authors choose. The alpha/amsalpha [Lot02] style is better in most cases. However, there ...


2

If you want to publish software in a quality scientific journal it is usually required that it represents a significant advance over previously published software, which is usually demonstrated by direct comparison with available related software. There will be no way to get around this. I would also recommend to put the code on github (http://github.com). ...


15

Most disciplines have either a "Funding", "Financial Support", or a general "Acknowledgements" section that people use to note the source of funding for the research in question. Since the initial research that led to this paper was supported by your previous PI, you should note that in the paper and thank the funding agency and your former advisor for their ...


23

In (pure) mathematics, if you began working on this project while supported by the PI's grant, but without or even against his advice, then your publication about it would ordinarily include a footnote on the first page, saying something like "Partially supported by grant 314159 from the Munificent Funding Agency, John Doe principal investigator." I ...


28

I cannot see why the former PI should have co-authorship on a paper they did not support or had any interest in. You are not a slave (or at least should not be) when on a post-doc (or any other position) and should retain the freedom to take own initiatives. As long as you fulfil any obligations within the position you are holding, no-one can prevent you ...


10

You should list reviewers (if any) that you think may be unfairly biased towards your science in some specific way. this includes persons with whom there may be a personal conflict that would shadow an objective review or people who have shown an unmitigated dislike for your science or the like. It is not intended to be used to list persons just because they ...


-1

The name/year system is much better, and you should use it whenever possible. In particular, if you work in a field with preprints your preprints should use name/year or initial/year even if the journal will later force you to change it. The reason is that name/year communicates relevant information, while number communicates no information at all. Just ...


5

You don't get to choose Although as a reader I vastly prefer the name-year system, as I don't have to look up most of the references, the advantages are rather irrelevant - in almost all cases, you don't get to choose, as you'll have to comply with the citation standard of the publication. The journal, conference or thesis standard generelly will list ...


5

The two systems are equally good but used in different communities/journals etc. You therefore need to check what is normally used in your field and when submitting manuscripts, of course, check what the specific journal uses. The fact that you say "most journals use" indicates you are in a field that uses numbered or Vancouver style (author-number) ...


16

I'll try to explain the problem from both perspectives: author and a journal typesetter. The typesetting process goes as follows: We pre-plan the issue contents 2 months in advance, in order to balance the issues in size. This is necessary for small journals with 4 or 6 issues per year, not quite for large journals with a long publishing queue. At this ...


0

The proof is an actually typesetted version of your paper, ready to production. In other words, everything is ready that someone pushes a button and the press can print the issue. This is the very last "lets check it one more time" thing. For this reason: If you have a correction, it is actually cost money to them. If there is 50 paper in the journal, ...


21

Galley proofs are part of the production process where a book or journal issue is actually printed, as opposed to the 'softer' process of deciding what pieces will go into it and in what form. As such, the deadlines for their revision are associated with the physical production process rather than the editorial process for the piece and can be quite ...


9

As I said in my answer to How much time is usually left for authors to return page proofs? What happens if I am late?, I have never seen a 24 hour turn around time requirement, but 48-72 hours seems quite common. I think there are two reasons for the turn around time to be on the order of days. From my experience, publishers are working on a tight schedule; ...


2

In addition to the fact that in most cases you can easily check the proofs within a day, I would assume that it’s also more efficient for the typesetters and in particular the copy editors in the case that you actually want to correct something as they are still familiar with your paper and are thus faster at applying your corrections. For example, after one ...


2

Your paper ought to be in pretty good shape after you get to the point of galley proofs. At that point, you are really just checking to be sure that their typesetters didn't introduce errors. All of your own typos and requests from reviewers should have been fixed by the time you get there.


1

The reason is simply that nobody is expected to make any changes to the galley proofs. The content and the basic wording of the paper is fixed after acceptance. No rewriting or reformulating is allowed at this stage. The authors should only check if the typesetting and copy editing did not introduce any errors. Often you are also given a list of changes that ...


0

Columbia University Libraries has a helpful document that provides guidance on determining the copyright status of books published in the United States. The guide provides links to online resources to allow you to determine the copyright holder. http://copyright.columbia.edu/copyright/files/2010/08/researching-the-copyright-status-of-books.pdf


1

As others have mentioned, the standard font varies, but is usually a serif font such as Times New Roman, although sans serif fonts such as Arial and Helvetica seem to be gaining traction as well. Their is major disagreement over which is easier to read--serif or sans serif fonts, with no clear consensus on the outcome. For example, see this paper. Font size ...


5

No, you should probably not contact the Associate Editor. First off, referees do not generally make decisions about accepting or rejecting a paper. Referees make recommendations to associate editors and editors, and they, in turn, make decisions. Thus, the associate editor who was cc'ed on the email to you is probably the decision-maker who read the ...


16

For an academic paper each publisher journal have their standards. These do not affect or are affected by the manuscripts sent in to the journal. Some journals specify fonts, commonly standard Times Roman, for their manuscripts. If the journal specifies something, follow that specification. Otherwise use a font that is easy to read. There is no need to use ...


9

If there's no template, then the choice is yours. However, you should make sure to pick a font that's easy to read. The usual standards in academia tend to be the Times, Helvetica/Arial, and Computer Modern families. This doesn't restrict you from using fonts like Book Antiqua, Myriad Pro, Goudy Old Style, or Garamond, but they're definitely not standard.


-1

I once rewrote a Ph.D. thesis for a Chinese student on the request of her thesis adviser, who said it was basically unsubmittable. Everything the student wrote was in 'Yoda' - backwards every sentence wrote she did. Most peculiar it was really. Just wanted to rewrite it after a few sentences you did. I never found out if she had the degree conferred. The ...


11

No, I don't think you should contact the editor. Journal editors are very busy people, and they don't have time to offer individual comments on every paper. If you think that your paper did not get a fair review, for example if you have reason to believe the reviewer did not read or understand the paper, then that is worth contacting the editor about. But ...


1

It's unlikely that two or three equally good journals exist to serve a single audience. That is: while your work may be a "good fit" to all three, it is likely to reach a somewhat different audience in each case. In my field, for example, one journal has a more "theoretical" outlook than another. Plenty of papers could easily fit in either, but theoreticians ...


2

Which field are you working in? This makes a big difference. If you are writing in, say, medicine or hard sciences, the differences from region to region would be minor. In other fields, such as history or other humanities, there could be substantial differences in expectations of both reader and writer in organization, rhetoric, and so forth. Your ...


7

In additions to the existing answers: CV beautifying, part 1: Publications in journals with different focus topics make you look more like an interdisciplinary person (which is usually preferred), while publishing in identically themed journals or even only one journal makes you look rather single-minded. CV beautifying, part 2: Excessive publishing in one ...


3

General advice for clarity (US style): Re-frame your thoughts into facts. No circular arguments nor implications. State them as simply as you can. Write them in bullets points and then add conjunctions. Don't pad them with fluff. Think about how to shorten/simplify for someone who has only 10 years of English. (Sad, but it works) Think about how ...



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