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0

A month's worth of work and a small analysis tool sounds like an acknowledgement, rather than an authorship. Depending on your relationship with the rest of the lab, I wouldn't press the point too hard -- a middle-author paper is worth something (but not much), and an acknowledgement is only worth the brief glow of seeing your name on a printed page.


2

To be acknowledged seem appropriate. When it comes to authorship, having your name on the paper implicitly means you should also fulfil several criteria such as outlined by the Vancouver Protocol (look at this post for details or search for posts with the tag authorship). It seems unlikely that you would be eligible for co-authorship.


3

First, it is important to clearly arrive at a conclusion that shows how the manuscript contributes to our unerstanding of the matter at hand. The referee apparently thinks your paper is lacking in this respect. Second, in most journals it is not up to the referee to decide if a papepr is published or not, the editor(s) decide based upon recommendations from ...


11

What is the point? If errors are due to factors other than those under ones own control, it should be mentioned (people are usually careful to protect their own names from problems they are not responsible for). Any unreferenced errors, ambiguities, misconceptions will clearly be labelled as the fault of the author by default.


0

One may consider sentences such as "If there is any error in this work then the error belongs and only belongs to me" or "Only merits of this paper are shared with X, Y, Z, ..." where X, Y, Z, ... are the minor contributors.


12

Making the manuscript error-free is left as an exercise for the reader.


2

At the very least, an acknowledgment would be appropriate. However, it very much depends on the standards in your field—and within your present lab—whether or not you'll be recognized for a small analysis tool. Also, I would not expect that the tool would lead to multiple authorship credits—you created the tool once, and should receive "credit" for it once. ...


8

Asking whether a contribution merits acknowledgement or co-authorship is always appropriate, as long as it is done in a professional and non-confrontational way. The answer may be "no," but it's certainly worthwhile to ask. (And if the answer is "no," at least you have learned something about standards for authorship and acknowledgement in your lab/field.)


2

If you think that an article of yours would be a useful reference, you can mention it on the Talk page for the relevant article or an associated Wikiproject, and suggest to other editors that they consider adding it to the main article.


-1

If the reference is at the end of the sentence and you don't have any other clue in the sentence, then the only connection is the order of appearance in the citation, e.g. [A, B], which means that the first quotation is from A and the second from B. I would suggest using citations in the sentence and not only at is end. E.g. From [A] the first is true ...


7

As stated by Massimo Ortolano, the typesetting is followed by a final check, proofreading, by the author. In many journals (I will not venture to say all) the movement of an article from the editor involves additional steps. The article is scrutinized to make sure it follows the journal format down to the smallest detail. this can be done by the editor, it ...


9

Typically, once a manuscript has been typeset, the editor asks the author(s) to check for errors that might have been introduced by the typesetting process. The checking process does not take too long, but I suggest you to check carefully the equations (if there are any), for their meaning is unknown to the typesetter and he or she might involuntarily ...


1

You may look into getting started with open-access journals. These are probably more likely to be amenable to independent research. Some examples are PloS, and The Winnower. Good luck!


8

I think the answer will depend on the country, so let me answer for France. From what I see, I would say that one is generally allowed to defend one's PhD without having published a paper, but only if the thesis contains the material for at least one international publication. This is judged by the two or three PhD referees and then confirmed by the PhD ...


14

Yes, it is very common for students to earn a PhD in mathematics without publishing any papers before graduating. Here are a few pieces of context: I have read a couple research articles that analyzed the Mathematical Review database, which is a very thorough listing of mathematics publications. One such article is "Patterns of Collaboration in ...


22

It is typical in the U.S. that mathematics Ph.D. students do not publish anything at all prior to earning a Ph.D., I think even at the elite places. Publication per se is not such a high priority, nor over-literal gauge of accomplishment, as it seems to be in some CompSci and Engineering disciplines (at least in the minds of some people). That is, to be ...


3

The three columns of wikipedia are Verifiability, No Original Research, and Neutral Point of View. In my opinion (and this is established in a large part of the wikipedia community, imho), you should avoid adding your own citations, since it is hard to have a neutral point of view wether your citation is really that important. What you can do instead (and ...


7

I think this question really has two parts, the ethical question and the practical question. First of, the ethical question. Let me say that I am surprised that you see the issue whether it is ethical to self-plug your work on Wikipedia as an entirely different issue than whether this is allowed by Wikipedia policy. Wikipedia is a private web site run on ...


1

You should cite your own work if it truly adds to the quality of the Wikipedia article. It's true that it's in one's self-interest to get the publicity you described from having one's work cited on Wikipedia, but it can also be constructive. After all, who is going to know the subject better than the person who wrote a peer-reviewed journal article on it? ...


3

You might want to consider attaching a Mathematica notebook to the arxiv submission, which is something I've been seeing relatively often lately.


1

I was in a somewhat similar position some time ago and decided against publishing the analytical results, since they were too long. Essentially, I was solving a linear system of equations with Mathematica, which can produce horribly long equations, which are hard to analyze any further. Also, computers might actually be faster in solving the initial linear ...


8

Never. Let someone else do it.


3

it should be peer-reviewed, otherwise wikipedia would be working nearly as a primary source (anyone could write something on a blog and use it as a reference, laughable). once it's peer-reviewed, the references should be reasonable, they should support what is written in wikipedia and what is written should have a general interest in the article itself. ...


-1

My opinion is that as long as the idea has some scientific merit (i.e. its novel) you could submit it to a journal. I've seen several papers of this sort by manufacturers of microscopes/vision systems explaining how their system works (and saying why its great) such as this one. My issues with these papers are that they are not that interesting from a ...


0

A publication in a journal would have more weight than a white-paper on the company's website, suggesting that a journal article might be a better choice An academic affiliation is not a strict requirement to publish a journal article, but in some fields it certainly adds a credibility barrier, which might make it more difficult to have the paper sent out ...


1

There is usually no absolute requirement to be associated with an academic institution in order to submit a paper to a journal. However, you have a serious credibility barrier to overcome if you choose that route, depending on how common independent research is in your field. My impression is that in some fields (network security, for example), publication ...


20

Idealistically, a paper should aspire to contain all the information required for reproducing its empirical results and verifying its deductive results with reasonable effort. Just writing the suggested sentence, however, does not allow for this, as someone would have to redo your work on finding those equations from scratch. This may drastically reduce the ...


3

Can you add an appendix to the paper? If not, I think whether it is reasonable to add the statement you proposed depends on how central the analytical results are to the findings in your paper. If the result isn't important, I think what you propose is fine. If the analytical result is crucial, then you need to think very carefully about making the result ...


2

The only piece of official information I've been able to find regarding the status of the taxonomy is this notice at the bottom of ACM Computing Classification System toc [Retrieved 2014-07-24]: Tools to help authors apply the 2012 CCS categories and concepts are being built. A new set of instructions will be issued in early 2013. Until then, authors ...


-2

If I may add one more thought to the discussion here. I think "the authors have to work more on the essay" proves that this referee is not able to put his thoughts in a usable, clear, scientific way. Style problem!? If he or she does not want to invest the effort in explaining himself properly, I doubt that he is a good referee. It is his/her duty to do a ...


2

I think there are many questions here; Independent Publishing? It is possible to publish your work as an independent researcher. see this question "Does one need to be affiliated with a university to publish papers?". For further confirmation, I would suggest to directly contact the responsible personnel of the conference or journal. Forums(Journal vs ...


-1

If you don't have strong qualifications or your own research history it is best to focus on your interests and goals. Think about these questions: What have you done? What are you doing now? What do you want to do in the future? Why is this publication important to you?


2

You can try any of the options, and see what result occurs. As a thought experiment, try submitting your paper to a journal of French historical literature. It will be rejected because (I am guessing) the paper has nothing to do with French historical literature, but it may also be rejected because it doesn't have French in it, or pay enough respect to ...


-2

You don't have to know. That's what the peer review process is for. But it might save you some time to use this radical tool called the Internet, whereby you can be in informal dialog with peers across the world.


9

Many journals have special formats for such remarks, usually called comments. Though these are usually directed at single papers, there might be journals out there which do not impose such a requirement. Also, as such requirements are not carved in stone, you might just contact the journals which published most of the papers making the mistake whether they ...


12

You should talk to colleagues from that area of interest to check whether it actually is a mistake or maybe a common generalization that, although not perfectly correct, is still 'good' in the systems that were discussed in the papers. Also writing a mail to the authors of said papers is a better idea before writing to the journals without any cross-check.


5

The comment could mean two things: There is a problem with the way your article is organized There is a problem with your English I would start by looking at other recent articles in that journal, and see if the organization of your article is different from those. If that is the case, I would rewrite (probably with a lot of "copy and paste") the article ...


4

The comment from the reviewer may mean; 1- Rearrange the ideas in your paper. For example, the order in which the things are explained may not make sense to the reviewer. Note that this is completely subjective thing, one order of ideas may make sense to one person but not so much to some other person. So, Just try some re-arrangement of idea and hope for ...


11

The referee is obviously satisfied with the "scientific" part of the publication but points out the narrative itself. I don't think that your English language skills are the deciding in the factor in that matter. You could write the same paper in your native language, let it someone translate it as it is and still get the same comment. As the referee puts ...


5

If you don't know where to publish something, but nonetheless it is of an appropriate standard and you consider it worth sharing, why not posting it to arXiv? You won't get prestige just for submitting, but: people can find it, you can easily point to it, it is timestamped.


2

Submit it to a conference that publishes a proceeding. Check the ACM SIGs. There are at least a couple that might work.


2

On the Elsevier journal finder service website you can find some data about the acceptance rate, but only for journals published by Elsevier (of course). You have to fill the name of your article and add the abstract, than you will find the acceptance rates between the results (together with Impact factor, acceptance time etc.). Unfortunately, you can´t just ...


0

The student should talk with their department and let a professor advise, acting on behalf of their Institution. This would be to help the Department find interesting work by students as well as helping the student with professional advice. In any case, they can list the university they are enrolled in without suggesting that it was sponsored by the ...


-4

I wouldn't bother with further publication. You've pretty much nailed the issue: search engines work quite well to "winnow the chaff" (to quote Rivest) when the right questioner comes along, and good security through the Petabytes of obscurity when they don't.


1

Yes, you should absolutely stop trying to get the book published until it is ready. Talk to the publisher who is considering your book, explain the situation to them and ask for their advice about what to do. In my opinion, a second edition is unlikely ever to be published because, as I understand it, mathematics research monographs don't sell well enough to ...


4

At the risk of sounding obvious let me share some advice that will not be specific to OU. First, wherever you are, you can do research on your own, although it's usually a tough call while being at the undergraduate level. A somewhat more realistic option could be locating and contacting the academics in your field at a university reasonably close to your ...


-1

I would say you must keep trying and get it published, even if you end up paying for that because this is your hard work and should not be wasted or lost. the best way is to go and talk to publishers and ask them what can be added or subtracted to meet their requirements and standards. You can also convert the book into an e-book and upload it on paid ...


12

I disagree and consider my work fully motivated. This is a key point. The issue isn't whether there exists compelling motivation, and you may be right that there is. Rather, the issue is whether you have successfully communicated this motivation to readers who have spent far less time thinking about the topic than you have and who lack the perspective ...


3

The time frame you mention is within what can be encountered. The time frames also differ wide between disciplines but also from journal to journal so one way to check how reasonable it is will be to check the journal for how long it has taken other papers to go through to acceptance. Many journals state this for each article and hopefully your journal does ...


10

As an editor, I once got a submission that combined two very distant areas of mathematics. That was no problem; I just sent it to two referees, one in each area, asked each one to referee the part in his area, and assured each one that I had another referee checking the rest of the paper. Of course, once both referees reported that their part of the paper ...



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