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10

There's a few separate things to consider here. I'll try to cover each succinctly. Your advisor probably (hopefully?) knows the field well. They should have a good idea of what would and wouldn't be accepted. I'm sure they will have been in a similar situation in the past, and have experience of it. Therefore their view on the matter is perhaps important ...


2

Is it 2.5 months under review or 2.5 months since submission? If the latter, how long did it take to get an editor assigned (i.e. to change to 'With Editor') and when did it go out for review (i.e. status changed to 'Under Review')? In my experience (not with PLOS ONE but with other PLOS journals), it can take a while to get an editor assigned, which can ...


1

One case in a similar direction is Sundeman v. The Seajay Society. A researcher included quotations from an unpublished work in a presentation; this was upheld as fair use. There's some discussion of the case and the outcome from the Columbia copyright office (have to scroll down a little bit). There are some other related cases listed on the same page, ...


1

The sentence "We recommend that you consider submission to an alternative venue" clearly means that your paper does not match the scope of the journal and should be submitted elsewhere. This indicates that your choice of journal was probably not right. There is a possibility that the editor was trying to suggest that you choose a journal that does not cater ...


1

You have already written to the journal thrice within a span of two and half months, which I think could be bothersome to many journals. Two and a half months is really not too long for the review process to get completed. In fact, it might take the journal that much time just to get reviewers. Yet, the journal has responded politely and positively each ...


1

TL;DR I think that it would be almost impossible to acquire the data you are interested in, because it will be very difficult to collect and there are a lot of inherent biases that you cannot get rid off. First of all, you have to know that there are four general ways to obtain a paper: Via a subscription to a journal. Via individual purchase from the ...


1

Half an answer... I no longer have a copy of Permissions: a survival guide (lent it to someone and never saw it again) but from memory, it discusses a few cases along these lines, particularly from the scholarly-art-monograph world. (While the XYZ estate can't stop you writing about XYZ, they can make it very difficult if they refuse you the rights to use ...


1

Usually three months are needed to wait for any inquiry form any journal about status of paper, but it is common, journals take more than 3 months of reviewing a paper. This is due to duration, which usually reviewers keep paper for reviewing .


3

This copyright statement does not say whether you can put it on the repository or your personal website. Unfortunately, it doesn't look like WIT Press actually have a clear policy on this. The "publish parts of this paper in connection with any other work by you" wording is usually used to refer to, as Simon says, reusing parts in later publications. ...


3

Assuming you are writing an article for an audience that knows what a genetic algorithm is (at least, anyone in CS and related fields), it is not so important to explain what it is, as much as the implementation details. In your shoes, I would cite the paper of the implementation. If there is a risk of readers not knowing what a genetic algorithm is, or you ...


12

PLOS One are pretty good at hassling editors to get a move on (I know, I am one) and if an editor doesn't move on a paper, they will reassign it to a new editor. So I don't think asking what's happening will help. The usual reason for delays is reviewers. You ask someone to review. They don't reply. They are reminded. After two weeks, you give up and try to ...


4

I think PLoS ONE's "accelerating" tagline has more to do with their open-access philosophy than the time to publication. My two experiences publishing there took 5 months and 8 months from submission to acceptance---that's still pretty fast compared to many journals, but nothing remarkable. Just leave it be for a little while and don't worry unless you go ...


9

Chasing the journal again doesn't seem like a good idea - you'll almost certainly get the same email back. Most PLOS papers are still out for review at this stage, so annoying though it is for you, it's not unusual for them! As of mid-2013, the mean time to publication acceptance in PLOS One was 134 days (~4.5 months) with a median time of 100 days (~3.5 ...


5

I don't know about your field, but 2 1/2 months doesn't strike me as particularly long. I realize that in part you feel that their reference to being speedier than others seems now like false advertising; still. I would not push more too soon, but if and when you do, I wouldn't ask "Is it ready?", but something like "I realize that the paper is out for ...


2

Some journals (e.g. Neural Networks) start off each year by listing the reviewers who have reviewerd for them in the preceding year to acknowledge the work they have done. I think that is quite a nice gesture. I don't think the reviewers of a particular paper should be identifiable though as that breaks down the benefit of anonymous reviewing. A better ...


9

The key for most scientists is the impact factor. Trying and succeeding to become listed will attract more good manuscripts (MS). The flood of sub-par MS you are describing comes from the fact that you are free. Unless you want to impose a fee for submitting MS you will simply have to maintain a very stringent policy for submissions and hope that the wave ...


2

There are many potential ways to credit reviewers and editors. The most common way from what I've seen is acknowleding the handling editors on papers and in some cases publishing a yearly list of all reviewers that have contributed to the journal during the year. However, note that some journals have an open review process and disclose the reviewers of ...


4

Your question asks for both editors and reviewers but goes on to focus on editors. I will thus start with editors. As you say editors are not generally listed on electronic copies of articles. Being Editor-in-Chief of a journal, I along with the other Associate Editors, do not see any need to be visible there. The reason is that one can ask to whom the ...


0

Although maybe not a main field, Robotics as a field is a bit similar to highly regarded conferences. The two largest are ICRA and IROS. Not that it is the best method, but you can see the importance of ICRA as being top ranked in googles metrics. I think you can see a few of these trends within the google rankings as very few disciplines have a ...


5

This means that the paper was presented to the members of society who were present at the meeting noted. I am more familiar with this language in much older papers. I believe its use here is a holdover from a time when paper would be presented by a Fellow of the society (who may have been the author of the paper, or otherwise) to the assembled members of ...


7

Speaking as an associate editor of a journal, I'm quite happy with the credit I receive: I'm listed as part of the editorial board online, it's listed on my C.V., and I get to help make sure what's getting published in my field is up to the standards of quality I desire. That said, some journals do list the editor and even the reviewers after publication ...


1

dont forget that some papers propose a reject and resubmit as a standard...that way, they artificially decrease the time between submitted paper and published paper, which is a simple trick. So reject and resubmit does often NOT mean that they did not like it...


0

This kind of contribution is important and not as much credited as it should be. But I wouldn't suggest to include single contributions to OEIS or other things like that in a CV. Two reasons: You are not the author and it's an impossible task to include the author list. It clutters the CV and makes it unreadable long. However, it deserves its space. In ...


1

Important: separate section. So no one thinks you are trying to sneak them in as equal to publications. Probably it will have no weight for recruiting. I suppose having the list there may cause someone on the committee to say "I've heard of this guy." But CVs have uses other than job searches. So go ahead and include them if you want to.


1

Engineering would most probably be "electrical engineering" and examples of venues where conference proceedings are published would include: * IEEEXplore (BTW, IEEE stands for "...Electrical and Electronics Engineers" * LNEE series published by Springer: http://www.springer.com/series/7818 You can also check http://www.springer.com/series/11156 at Springer, ...


1

I know that you have asked specifically about IEEE/ACM, but assuming you are interested also in other CS conferences - with Springer you can get ToC of each new volume published, e.g., http://www.springer.com/series/558 for Lecture Notes in Computer Science (the major series for CS conference proceedings in Springer)


0

Publications are really the name of the game, and you'll find that not very many people read theses (especially Master's theses). If you are interested in staying in academia, then it is worth it to take the time to publish your Master's work regardless of whether it's required for the PhD. I tried writing up my Master's work after I finished my PhD, and ...


3

At least think about the possibility that the following may be true: Your greatest problem is your embarrassment about being associated with work that is nontrivial and somewhat interesting, but not very ambitious. I can't speak for other academics, but this ailment afflicts many (most?) mathematicians. Rota famously quipped that the worth of a ...


1

The number of students in each blended course is definitely a consideration when creating effective assignments and assessments of student learning, however, the most important consideration is the student learning outcomes (SLOs) - what are students expected to do, think, or know by the end of your course? The SLOs will direct the design of the ...


3

From my point of view (as someone whose eyes are still tired after reading 180 application packets...), having this on your CV would not be a negative thing. It should of course be on a separate list from your peer reviewed journal publications along with other technical reports, conference proceedings papers, etc. The positive aspect of this is that it ...


9

I don't know if it's legal (it could depend on what counts as fair use, for example), but I wouldn't be concerned. I don't see any likelihood that this will harm you. It's possible that they asked the journal for permission to reprint the abstract, but I'd guess they just grabbed it from the web. The "journalists obtained a quote" stuff may be intended to ...


1

First, editors take decisions seriously and will not rush decisions unnecessarily, however, neither does anyone want unnecessary delays, long turnover times is not good for the journal in that authors find the venue less attractive for publishing. In "my" journal we have set a three week period to make decisions based on the reviews. This period is by no ...


0

I only want to amplify on the answer by Corvus, based on my own experience as editor. First, editors usually have other full-time jobs as teachers and researchers. In my field, there are no editors who are employees of publishing companies rather than academicians. Other overwhelming demands are the main cause of lag between receipt of review and making a ...


3

There are a number of possibilities. Off the top of my head: The editor is traveling or otherwise occupied. In my experience, this is particularly likely if you are dealing with a journal that employs professional editors rather than relying upon academic editors. The reviews are mixed and the editor has decided to careful assess the manuscript himself or ...


5

I presume this is a law review. If so, you should really talk to your faculty advisor, who is, presumably, a lawyer. From my non-lawyer perspective, where is the consideration necessary to form a contract? What are his damages if he were to try to sue? Specific performance doesn't seem likely if he were either. The legal publishing world is very different ...


0

I think a critical component of being a scientific postdoc is to gain experience with writing and submitting research proposals and papers. While I understand the concern that postdocs often do NOT get the credit they deserve when assisting with proposals, the benefit is more typically indirect and usually becomes critical experience when postdocs are ...


24

I believe the author is in the right here. Accepting an article is morally binding and should commit the journal to publish it, barring exceptional circumstances. Authors should be entitled to rely on that commitment. Although you may not have any legal obligation to publish the paper at this point, to refuse to do so would be extremely unprofessional and ...


5

First, your titular question: What is the value of participating in proposal-writing efforts, for a postdoc researcher? Especially in Europe, and when applying for faculty positions, the value is huge. Successfully playing the grant game is nowadays what keeps the lights on in many European universities, at least research-wise. Having a track record in ...


5

Regardless of your elaborate schemes, you will always need to take into consideration that you cannot "sell something" twice. If the only novelty that you present in a second paper are additional experiments (and deriving conclusions from these), then you must never ever state something different as a contribution of the paper. And in many fields, this ...


3

Last year, I was the publication chair for an IEEE conference, meaning that I was responsible (among other things) for working with IEEE to get the proceedings onto Xplore. Now, more than six months since we turned in the proceedings to IEEE, and nearly as long after the conference was held, only one part of the proceedings is online. The IEEE repeatedly ...


10

I am actually just a few steps ahead of your shoes, so I'll tell you what I'm doing, that I think might help you as well. In high-school I also found something interesting in mathematics. I've been developing it for a year now, so now that I'm in college I tried taking it to professors. Surprisingly, none of them had much interest in primality testing. ...


6

In my publishing experience, and from what I have seen elsewhere, I think the most appropriate thing to do in this scenario is to simply have an acknowledgment. This is standard for most professional publications. For example, consider the article Counting Triangles to Sum Squares by Joe DeMaio that appeared in the College Mathematics Journal (a periodical ...


0

Publication is not a prerequisite for PhD programs. To be specific, the only requirements for a PhD program are those published by the particular university department in the official degree catalog. But having your name on some published articles before applying for PhD programs, and including your publications as part of your "pitch," sure makes for a ...


2

The most probable reason is that many publishers use Adobe products (such as InDesign) in their production and these used to rely heavily on EPS. This might change in the future as PDF becomes more popular. Also, EPS is an open format, which means any graphing or vector graphics program (like Inkscape) have options to save artwork and plots in EPS. Not to ...


29

First, if it is not submission-ready, then it is unlikely that it is arXiv-ready either. If you put it in another place, you won't get much prestige or recognition, so I would aim at a place accessible to everyone (without login) - your homepage, GitHub or anything (it does not matter). It may be a good place if you want to start discussions. Second, it is ...


9

The eps format used to be the only possibility for including graphics in (La)TeX. Now the more modern alternative is using pdflatex, which also supports other more common graphic formats natively (such as pdf). Most journals have outdated LaTeX processing pipelines, so they are still using eps. (And, frankly, they have little incentive to get more modern, ...


3

Try the PeerJ Prepreints. https://peerj.com/preprints/ Here is what I copied from their website: A PeerJ 'PrePrint' is a draft that has not yet been peer reviewed for formal publication. Similar to preprint servers that already exist (for example arXiv.org), authors can submit draft, incomplete, or final versions of articles they are working on. ...


2

Eps is a format designed specifically for printing. All publishing companies have eps and ps editing capacity .


4

You should ask the publisher. It is simply obvious they will give permission "under certain conditions." The concern is to know what those conditions are. I find the wording about "any reasonable request" vague and much less author-friendly that what I usually see. But their actual intent might be just fine. Ask specifically about your personal webpage ...


7

By default, you hold the copyright for everything you write (note that some things such as contracts of employment may change this default). When you "assign" the copyright, as often one must to an academic publisher, you give them control over your work. At that point you are correct that you would not be able to put it on your personal webpage without ...



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