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0

I doesn't sound to me like it should go on the CV. I'd say that if you're applying for jobs you'll probably get to recycle some of that material for your research statement, but it seems weird to put that piece on your CV.


5

In addition to all other excellent recommendations I would just highlight that reporting a flaw in the paper is in your own best interest. Imagine the paper is accepted. Then others will try to reproduce the results or scrutinize the computational methods. If other researchers find flaws in the paper that may force a retraction. Depending on the popularity ...


12

You should definitely contact the editor as soon as possible. It is not certain that the editor has provided your review to the authors yet and even if the editor has done so, receiving the additional information allows the editor to make additional decisions concerning additional revisions or even rejecting the paper altogether. So it is vital that you ...


51

What's the recommended course of action in this situation? Should I notify the editor of this additional discovery, so that the authors can directly take care of it in their (presumably ongoing) revision, Yes, I think so. This seems to be in the best interest of all involved: you, the authors and the journal. It may be tempting to feel "embarrassed" ...


13

It is certainly advisable to notify the editor, so that she/he can pass on the information to the authors. The editor may or may not take this information into account for the decision. When sending the information, you may want to offer to write a revised version of the review.


0

Often a "main" proceedings collects the papers from the main conference tracks and "companion" proceedings collects the papers of satellite events, such as workshops and such things. In some cases, only the "main" proceedings is considered as a publication (in Computer Science, at least) and the "companion" proceedings is not.


1

There's no major difference between "main" proceedings and "companion" proceedings. It just means that there will be a proceedings volume that collects the papers. Perhaps the only possible item might be that it's not a dedicated series—it might be a special journal issue that serves as a proceedings volume.


1

IEEE policy explicitly allows the author, their institution, or other pre-print repository such as arXiv to distribute the final preprint version of any document, but not the version from IEEE Xplore. Scientifically, there is no reason to differentiate between the two, so as long as you send the final preprint version, it accomplishes the task of spreading ...


4

Whether your institution plans to put it online is a question you have to ask them. Whether they are allowed to put it online depends on the policies of the journal where it was published. You will need to read the copyright transfer agreement that you accepted when the paper was published.


11

Think about relevance to your results Is the particular criticism relevant to the point of your paper ? For example "The method described in paper X works only in dry conditions, so for researching dolphin behavior it's not useful and we used a different approach described in chapter 4" is a relevant criticism and should be included. "Paper X is a very ...


2

I think it is a good decision to target your manuscript for a single audience if your experience has shown that presenting it in a broader fashion misses the mark. It is not unusual to write two different papers that advance the same prior work and present new results. However, this shouldn't simply be a matter of repackaging the results of the first paper, ...


6

This is actually something my group also deals with extensively. A lot of the work we do is focused on improving existing computational methods to improve their efficiency or extend their range. A lot of the time, the actual work done is of very little interest to the end-user audience, but quite significant from a computer science perspective. So a lot of ...


0

Ignore the doubters. Do the goddamn experiments and keep a METICULOUS log of your activity, practice, procedures etc. Videos, transcripts, audios, pictures, notes, EVERYTHING. Most of the greatest minds in our history all came from little to no educational background, (or completely different fields) People forget that science isn't about a degree, ...


2

Yes it is absolutely possible; But first of all - it's fantastic to get into these things at a young age, and before I say anything else: don't stop learning, no matter what anyone says. I was exactly like you: curious, ready to learn, and had ideas of my own and I wanted to get publications, but - I was in high school and just a teenager with zilch ...


5

Yes, it's possible if uncommon. I did it, learned a ton, and had a blast. The byline in the journal just unceremoniously lists my affiliation as my high school. It's actually pretty funny. But the others' answers are spot-on; you have to put in a lot of background reading in the field. This is much easier when you have a mentor in the field to guide you, but ...


26

There are two different types of "no qualifications": A person may be "unqualified" because they don't have the usual pieces of paper A person may be "unqualified" because they are not familiar with the standards and practices of the field. Don't worry about the first one. Worry about the second one. For example, one of the other comments raised the ...


23

You don't need any formal qualifications to get an article published. You don't have to have degrees or titles or money or anything. What you have to do is make an original, important contribution to the sum total of human knowledge. I don't want to offend you here, but you need to be realistic. The chances that you are going to make such a contribution at ...


6

There are no official policies on things not being allowed to have the same name. It doesn't seem to be a legal problem: How many books are called Algebra? and how many songs are called I love you? How many companies have been called Smith and sons?) It is not a technical problem since title is not the most relevant citation information Is it an ethical ...


3

I use a Academic Writing Check for most of my academic writing, including my thesis. It checks for: passive voice: don't use the passive voice if you can help it. duplicate words ("the the"): this has saved me many times. wrong abbreviations: for example, i.e (no second period) bad typography and some others To check missing or duplicate labels, I use ...


10

One thing you should understand is that in this crazy world, she may benefit from having your thesis published more than you, especially if she is currently under considerations for reappointment or promotion, so don't be too hard on her: rather blame the entire screwed up evaluation system in academia that has made much stronger people panic and do ...


2

Copyright Status Perhaps you gave away your copyright. Review your copyright status on arXiv. Copyright status can vary as described here including public domain.


0

This leads to poor communication between the authors that stay and the person that left, usually motivated by the latter not replying (perhaps reading) emails concerning the work or taking too long to do so. Then maybe it is time to think how this communication could be improved. My main idea would be to offer a answer mechanism that basically takes no ...


17

First of all, it doesn't matter where, how, or even if a person is employed. Science can be done by anyone, anywhere, "academia" or not. Assuming the person has made significant contribution by the standards of your field, the only things that matter are: Is it possible to contact them? Do they want to be an author? If they have contributed ...


10

Instead of including a personal website, why not just include a permanent e-mail address? Simplest would be just get a Gmail account (or any free webmail provider) for your work correspondence. If you want a more professional looking account, sometimes professional organizations can provide to dues-paying members e-mail forwarding services. For example, ...


1

As to another reason using a pseudonym is appropriate is when one is living and researching in a country which would frown upon any given thesis or argument of said article. This can be in many fields of research such as anthropology, sociology, political science, journalism, etc., which compels a researcher to work in places such as China and Iran.


7

This is in fact very common especially after the PhD. How should this situation be dealt with? First talk to the person. Does he want to be included? Does he want to be an author (possibly even the main author)? Or doesn't he want to have anything to do with it? Is it ethical to submit a paper when a coauthor that left academia has not actively ...


31

I believe the first thing you need to do is to contact and email the editor in chief of that journal and give him/her a link to your arxiv paper. He/She a long with the editorial board have to retract the article (hopefully, with a big red X stating that the authors have plagiarised citing your arxiv work).


0

I once was asked by a prof to provide comments on a draft paper given to him by a colleague. I added a third section to the paper, and re-ordered and re-worded the arguments that were in the draft. The paper was then published with no further changes. There was no recognition of my contribution by the author.


0

Any skeleton/guideline to follow? Actually the links you provided are excellent and give a good basis to start with. There's not much to add to it. Reporting styles of results sometimes differ from field to field so I think it's best to examine the style used by some of the papers that you cite that are similar to yours. How do you make the ...


7

In French, paper is definitely informal, while article is the term to be used in a written document. However, in English I feel that we tend to use "journal article" more often that "journal paper", "conference article" less than "conference paper", "workshop article" far less often than "workshop paper". So paper might tend to designate a piece of ...


3

An "article" typically specifically means a paper in a journal, while "paper" is a more general term that also includes conferences, technical memos, etc.


4

One often write a review paper about a topic on which one has no previous experience mainly in order to LEARN about this topic. Whoever asked you to write this review might think that this topic could be of interest to you, or maybe that simply doing the exercise of a review would be good for you.


2

When a paper is assigned to a reviewer, the reviewer may decline or fail to review the paper. In this case the editor will assign the paper to a new reviewer. The status date will change at the day the new review was assigned, but the status will remain the same.


2

Writing a paper is, of course, more difficult for non-native speakers. They have to learn a second language and master it well enough to convey compplex ideas to their audience. And that is no easy task. That being said, I don't believe there is much of a bias against non-native speakers. I myself have published several papers (authored with other ...


4

It's probably more a commentary than an answer. I look forward to others' input on this issue as well. As an ESL myself, I joined the English academic community knowing that language will be an extra barrier. I wrote (or perhaps still write) many awkward sentences that are grammatically sensible but funny to read from the angle of general English usage. To ...


2

It's hard to give objective advice without knowing more about the case, especially which journal, but this journal's behavior is surprising. Usually fake journals will publish anything as long as you pay for it. Some have as strategy to generously offer free publishing to 'high quality papers' (which tells you something about the papers that don't fall in ...


21

The most important thing you need to do is figure out the copyright status. If you have given them exclusive rights to reproduce the work, then you may not be able to publish it anywhere else. It is likely that the copyright transfer was part of a publication contract where the publisher has agreed to publish your work in exchange for the copyright transfer. ...


2

Publishing the thesis "as is" Your first option to to publish the thesis as it is now, without any modifications. This is usually the easier thing to do. Assuming your thesis in in PDF format, you can just upload it to your own website. Another option would be to upload it to a repository such as figshare.com, where it will also be assigned a DOI and it ...


1

The name error is a factual error and it should be possible to request a corrigendum to the journal. See for instance here: http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/v16/n12/full/nn1213-1906a.html All of the other answers hinting to the fact that you cannot change your name on a published article assume that the name was correct at the time of publication. This ...


1

For fixing, I think the advice in the linked question is the way to go: contact the publisher and ask them to correct it. This is what errata are for, and it's perfectly normal. I think the harder question is what to do about the future. On the one hand, the non-distinguishability of I and l are just going to keep causing problems (as can be seen from ...


10

Google has recently done an analysis of citation trends, and found that citations to "less" prestigious journals are actually increasing: Rise of the Rest: The Growing Impact of Non-Elite Journals An extract from the above study: "... now that finding and reading relevant articles in non-elite journals is about as easy as finding and reading articles in ...


0

The answer to this depends on the state of the filing and the particulars of the publication venue. If you haven't filed anything yet, you definitely aren't required to disclose, and more than you are required to cite a paper that hasn't been submitted yet. After all, any number of things might prevent the filing from happening. Also, if you disclose ...


2

The important distinction that you want to pay attention to here is whether the proceedings are archival or not. Fewer and fewer publications (conference or journal) are actually put onto dead trees: it's expensive and heavy and takes up lots of space in your office. An archival publication is one whose proceedings are in the custody of an institution that ...


6

You should have a basic workflow for assessing the merit of a resource. If it's from an unknown journal or seems a bit dodgy, I would do a quick scan of the abstract, introduction, methods and conclusion (if they don't exist then there's a red flag). Also, what resources are listed in the references/bibliography? If they are all low-quality (the MSM, other ...


2

Faculty on the admissions panel for a department typically assume that undergraduates did not do any of the "heavy lifting" on any paper they are on. Rather, they assume the PI/grad student/etc. had the idea, did most of the experiments, wrote the paper, and that the undergraduate may have assisted in parts of the experiments that were routine. This may not ...


3

At this point, for almost any field worth doing research in there is just too much literature for anyone, even an expert, to keep up with. In the field that I work in on the order of 100 papers are published a week - I could literally read all day and still not be caught up. Instead of this, I have found much more use in following particular groups whose ...


1

One reason to not cite a specific page is if the information isn't on a specific page. Books, far more than papers, can communicate not only facts or single points of information, but ideas presented as a coherent whole. For example, a paper I wrote cited Karl Popper's The Logic of Scientific Discovery when talking about the process of scientific reasoning. ...


6

Back in the old days before online publication and widespread indexing of journal articles, readers depended on journal publishers to curate the research papers and select the best papers for publication. Now, there are many more places to publish, and the number of papers being published has grown dramatically. More so than in the past, good papers are ...



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