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5

Yes, it's possible if uncommon. I did it, learned a ton, and had a blast. The byline in the journal just unceremoniously lists my affiliation as my high school. It's actually pretty funny. But the others' answers are spot-on; you have to put in a lot of background reading in the field. This is much easier when you have a mentor in the field to guide you, but ...


22

There are two different types of "no qualifications": A person may be "unqualified" because they don't have the usual pieces of paper A person may be "unqualified" because they are not familiar with the standards and practices of the field. Don't worry about the first one. Worry about the second one. For example, one of the other comments raised the ...


17

You don't need any formal qualifications to get an article published. You don't have to have degrees or titles or money or anything. What you have to do is make an original, important contribution to the sum total of human knowledge. I don't want to offend you here, but you need to be realistic. The chances that you are going to make such a contribution at ...


5

There are no official policies on things not being allowed to have the same name. It doesn't seem to be a legal problem: How many books are called Algebra? and how many songs are called I love you? How many companies have been called Smith and sons?) It is not a technical problem since title is not the most relevant citation information Is it an ethical ...


1

I use a Academic Writing Check for most of my academic writing, including my thesis. It checks for: passive voice: don't use the passive voice if you can help it. duplicate words ("the the"): this has saved me many times. wrong abbreviations: for example, i.e (no second period) bad typography and some others To check missing or duplicate labels, I use ...


11

One thing you should understand is that in this crazy world, she may benefit from having your thesis published more than you, especially if she is currently under considerations for reappointment or promotion, so don't be too hard on her: rather blame the entire screwed up evaluation system in academia that has made much stronger people panic and do ...


1

First of all, good on you for taking a calm approach, particularly when you asked her stop directly. However, her persistent actions, especially after you have asked her politely and directly to stop is bordering on harassment. Not only that, she is undermining you with your present supervisor. A good course of action I can suggest is to firstly speak ...


0

Copyright Status Perhaps you gave away your copyright. Review your copyright status on arXiv. Copyright status can vary as described here including public domain.


1

This leads to poor communication between the authors that stay and the person that left, usually motivated by the latter not replying (perhaps reading) emails concerning the work or taking too long to do so. Then maybe it is time to think how this communication could be improved. My main idea would be to offer a answer mechanism that basically takes no ...


17

First of all, it doesn't matter where, how, or even if a person is employed. Science can be done by anyone, anywhere, "academia" or not. Assuming the person has made significant contribution by the standards of your field, the only things that matter are: Is it possible to contact them? Do they want to be an author? If they have contributed ...


10

Instead of including a personal website, why not just include a permanent e-mail address? Simplest would be just get a Gmail account (or any free webmail provider) for your work correspondence. If you want a more professional looking account, sometimes professional organizations can provide to dues-paying members e-mail forwarding services. For example, ...


1

As to another reason using a pseudonym is appropriate is when one is living and researching in a country which would frown upon any given thesis or argument of said article. This can be in many fields of research such as anthropology, sociology, political science, journalism, etc., which compels a researcher to work in places such as China and Iran.


8

This is in fact very common especially after the PhD. How should this situation be dealt with? First talk to the person. Does he want to be included? Does he want to be an author (possibly even the main author)? Or doesn't he want to have anything to do with it? Is it ethical to submit a paper when a coauthor that left academia has not actively ...


28

I believe the first thing you need to do is to contact and email the editor in chief of that journal and give him/her a link to your arxiv paper. He/She a long with the editorial board have to retract the article (hopefully, with a big red X stating that the authors have plagiarised citing your arxiv work).


0

I once was asked by a prof to provide comments on a draft paper given to him by a colleague. I added a third section to the paper, and re-ordered and re-worded the arguments that were in the draft. The paper was then published with no further changes. There was no recognition of my contribution by the author.


0

Any skeleton/guideline to follow? Actually the links you provided are excellent and give a good basis to start with. There's not much to add to it. Reporting styles of results sometimes differ from field to field so I think it's best to examine the style used by some of the papers that you cite that are similar to yours. How do you make the ...


7

In French, paper is definitely informal, while article is the term to be used in a written document. However, in English I feel that we tend to use "journal article" more often that "journal paper", "conference article" less than "conference paper", "workshop article" far less often than "workshop paper". So paper might tend to designate a piece of ...


3

An "article" typically specifically means a paper in a journal, while "paper" is a more general term that also includes conferences, technical memos, etc.


4

One often write a review paper about a topic on which one has no previous experience mainly in order to LEARN about this topic. Whoever asked you to write this review might think that this topic could be of interest to you, or maybe that simply doing the exercise of a review would be good for you.


2

When a paper is assigned to a reviewer, the reviewer may decline or fail to review the paper. In this case the editor will assign the paper to a new reviewer. The status date will change at the day the new review was assigned, but the status will remain the same.


2

Writing a paper is, of course, more difficult for non-native speakers. They have to learn a second language and master it well enough to convey compplex ideas to their audience. And that is no easy task. That being said, I don't believe there is much of a bias against non-native speakers. I myself have published several papers (authored with other ...


4

It's probably more a commentary than an answer. I look forward to others' input on this issue as well. As an ESL myself, I joined the English academic community knowing that language will be an extra barrier. I wrote (or perhaps still write) many awkward sentences that are grammatically sensible but funny to read from the angle of general English usage. To ...


2

It's hard to give objective advice without knowing more about the case, especially which journal, but this journal's behavior is surprising. Usually fake journals will publish anything as long as you pay for it. Some have as strategy to generously offer free publishing to 'high quality papers' (which tells you something about the papers that don't fall in ...


21

The most important thing you need to do is figure out the copyright status. If you have given them exclusive rights to reproduce the work, then you may not be able to publish it anywhere else. It is likely that the copyright transfer was part of a publication contract where the publisher has agreed to publish your work in exchange for the copyright transfer. ...


2

Publishing the thesis "as is" Your first option to to publish the thesis as it is now, without any modifications. This is usually the easier thing to do. Assuming your thesis in in PDF format, you can just upload it to your own website. Another option would be to upload it to a repository such as figshare.com, where it will also be assigned a DOI and it ...


2

I have had this with one of my recent publications, my surname was spelled with a superfluous 'x' - which was beyond odd. What I did was to immediately contact the editor and alerted them to this error. I gave a precise account of the error (full bibliographic reference). The editor's response and speed of response indicated the importance of having the ...


1

The name error is a factual error and it should be possible to request a corrigendum to the journal. See for instance here: http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/v16/n12/full/nn1213-1906a.html All of the other answers hinting to the fact that you cannot change your name on a published article assume that the name was correct at the time of publication. This ...


1

For fixing, I think the advice in the linked question is the way to go: contact the publisher and ask them to correct it. This is what errata are for, and it's perfectly normal. I think the harder question is what to do about the future. On the one hand, the non-distinguishability of I and l are just going to keep causing problems (as can be seen from ...


10

Google has recently done an analysis of citation trends, and found that citations to "less" prestigious journals are actually increasing: Rise of the Rest: The Growing Impact of Non-Elite Journals An extract from the above study: "... now that finding and reading relevant articles in non-elite journals is about as easy as finding and reading articles in ...


0

The answer to this depends on the state of the filing and the particulars of the publication venue. If you haven't filed anything yet, you definitely aren't required to disclose, and more than you are required to cite a paper that hasn't been submitted yet. After all, any number of things might prevent the filing from happening. Also, if you disclose ...


2

The important distinction that you want to pay attention to here is whether the proceedings are archival or not. Fewer and fewer publications (conference or journal) are actually put onto dead trees: it's expensive and heavy and takes up lots of space in your office. An archival publication is one whose proceedings are in the custody of an institution that ...


6

You should have a basic workflow for assessing the merit of a resource. If it's from an unknown journal or seems a bit dodgy, I would do a quick scan of the abstract, introduction, methods and conclusion (if they don't exist then there's a red flag). Also, what resources are listed in the references/bibliography? If they are all low-quality (the MSM, other ...


0

An error is an error and doesn't get any less so for the passage of time. The authors need to correct their paper, it is misconduct if they don't.


2

Faculty on the admissions panel for a department typically assume that undergraduates did not do any of the "heavy lifting" on any paper they are on. Rather, they assume the PI/grad student/etc. had the idea, did most of the experiments, wrote the paper, and that the undergraduate may have assisted in parts of the experiments that were routine. This may not ...


4

At this point, for almost any field worth doing research in there is just too much literature for anyone, even an expert, to keep up with. In the field that I work in on the order of 100 papers are published a week - I could literally read all day and still not be caught up. Instead of this, I have found much more use in following particular groups whose ...


1

One reason to not cite a specific page is if the information isn't on a specific page. Books, far more than papers, can communicate not only facts or single points of information, but ideas presented as a coherent whole. For example, a paper I wrote cited Karl Popper's The Logic of Scientific Discovery when talking about the process of scientific reasoning. ...


7

Back in the old days before online publication and widespread indexing of journal articles, readers depended on journal publishers to curate the research papers and select the best papers for publication. Now, there are many more places to publish, and the number of papers being published has grown dramatically. More so than in the past, good papers are ...


1

Faculty in those institutions have their own research agendas, and yes, there are very awesome undergraduates who do not have any publications who land the dream of the Ph D. And this is a top institution I have observed my friends get into without the publications. This said, the work performed in undergrad is your CV. The projects that you chose to ...


29

There are a lot of good publications in the world that are not published by mega-publishers. Some of them you've never heard of because they are regional or specific to certain subfields, but are still very good. It's also often difficult for people from certain countries to publish in mainstream conference venues due to visa issues. For example, IEEE and ...


2

There is also often a good positive reason to cite a book without reference to specific chapters or subsections, and that is if one is pointing the reader to a source of review or introductory material. I personally often find it much better to point to a comprehensive survey (which is equally often a book rather than a journal paper), rather than a giant ...


20

I would recommend that you ask yourself a question: why do I want this book "officially" published? You could, after all, just make the material free online via arXiv or as a webpage or an archival technical report of various types depending on its contents and your situation. Prestige of having a published book? A pay-to-publish press will generally ...


8

In my experience, most undergraduates, even excellent ones with strong research potential, do not publish. The reason is simple: undergraduates usually have to spend a lot of time on classes and don't have much time available for research, even if they're very good at it. The likelihood of both producing a significant publishable result and seeing it in ...


13

The admissions process for graduate school is complicated. I am not aware of any admissions committee that requires prior publications to be accepted. Admissions decisions are not so much based on the presence/absence of publications but on the extent to which the application demonstrates an ability to conduct research. Prior publications can demonstrate an ...


14

The value of a pay-to-publish book is approximately the same as any other pay-to-publish material. As described in this answer, the only way for someone to judge a non-peer-reviewed publications is to Read them, see what they're worth. So, if this book attracts a large number of readers in your academic community and they are impressed, it will ...


3

One thing to keep in mind is that certificates from a conference are easy to fake: anyone can make a plausible-looking certificate on their own computer, and the admissions committee will have no idea what a real certificate would look like. (And even if the admissions committee somehow knew what it should look like, an applicant could copy/modify someone ...


6

As per the answer to your previous question, you are not required to spontaneously supply proof for everything in your CV, and it would look extremely unusual to attempt to do so in this case. The fact that you could be asked to substantiate anything written in your CV, and the consequences of subsequently being caught in a lie, are considered enough of a ...


3

It is still an open question whether open access actually leads to more citations or not. This is at least partly because the models and players in OA are still rapidly shifting, especially with the rapidly increasing influx of low quality or scam publishers who have embraced open access because it is an easier way to bilk money out of insecure early-career ...


5

The typical way to list such a paper is 'author, author, and author. "Title", Journal of XYZ, to appear' That should be enough with regards to your C.V. Anyone in academia will be familiar with this notion, and is unlikely to be think that you might be lying. After all, the truth will become obvious one way or another shortly. If they want to see ...


1

The assumption implicit in many of discussions (such at these) about 'promotion' always seem to revolve around the premise that there is some sort of institutional impediment to promotion. But, there is another reason that never seems to be discussed: perhaps the associate professor isn't promoted because they have no interest in being promoted. Seriously, ...


6

Practiced in moderation, self-citation is natural, healthy, and ethical. There are typical two reasons why excessive self-citation can become problematic: It often indicates a person who is unaware of the related work being done by the rest of the community. Self-citation can be abused to falsely inflate one's perceived importance and citation metrics. A ...



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