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1

Perhaps re-drawing the figures, slightly modifying the style and the form, can help avoiding these copyright issues ? That's what we do, in my filed and country (geography/maps, France).


0

I would not consider a conference paper as a journal article. Of course conference paper published in a journal should be noted but separately from journal articles. Usually the selection process of conference abstracts is different to peer-review process in a journal. Selection process for conference is more straight forward and I think personal views ...


4

To the best of my understanding, the key reason why some conferences publish their proceedings as journal special issues is precisely to enable the papers to be listed as journal papers rather than conference papers. This is essentially a kludge to get around bureaucrats and people from fields with an "only journals count" prejudice. As such, I think ...


4

The process of finding the intersection of the references in a given set of papers is known as bibliographic coupling and was first proposed by M. M. Kessler in 1963 in a paper that sadly remains locked behind a paywall 52 years later. Kessler was thinking about doing this for pairs of papers but of course you could do this for an arbitrary number. What ...


1

I don't understand whether you're asking about my subjective emotional reaction to reviewer statements, or my rational evaluation of the objective content of the statement. So I would assume you're asking about both. Basically, any comment that suggests a flaw in my data, analysis or reasoning is emotionally negative: I freely accept corrections of typos, ...


8

When reading reviewer feedback, I generally divide things up into five mental categories (sorted from best to worst): Praise: It feels really good when a reviewer "gets" a paper. Little stuff: Anything that can be cleaned up easily, like typos and grammar failures, dropped minus signs, mislabeled figures. Suggestions for improvement: Things that are ...


1

Reviewer's comments should ideally be constructive. They should not just point out the flaws but ideally, it could also provide some suggestions or briefly comment about how to fix these flaws or improve the paper. Reviews should discuss strengths and weaknesses of a paper objectively. What is a negative comment? It could be just rude or harsh comments as ...


1

tl;dr - everything useless for improvement = negative For me this is more a question of consequence than of "form" (style of writing, word choice). (Here I agree @Wrzlprmft's warning, that answers can be very opinion-based) From a (tried) objective view, I categorize comments as negative if they: criticize without suggestions or advice to improve the ...


6

This sounds to me like a great opportunity to introduce yourself and possibly find a mentor relationship in the bargain. Just be succinct and straight-forward about who you are and what led you to contact this particular professor. I would also recommend taking the opportunity to invite the professor to give you feedback, which 1) may be sorely needed ...


0

Before continue to read this answer, I think you should read Florian D'Souza's answer first. Well, after consider many aspect, I decided to take the risk and included it into my SOP. My motto is "Do whatever that doesn't harm". The hardest part is to know the distinction between the good things and the looking good things. Note: this answer is my own ...


6

I think you are focusing on the wrong issue. The multiple-submission issue may have long term consequences. It would be a problem even if you could get a complete refund of your costs for attending the first conference. Before making any decisions, I suggest carefully reviewing all paperwork you or your advisor have submitted for each conference. You may, ...


9

Based on the time of year, if the journal is based in the US or Europe, it might be that the editor and staff are on vacation. You have confirmed with your bank that they have received funds, so I wouldn't worry too much. Give them a week or two, and then follow up more strenuously.


8

There is only one solution: The paper has been accepted on first conference. You paid for going there You go there and present the paper. Withdraw from second conference ASAP (like Monday morning after notifying your adrvisor). Search for new advisor, because him a) advising double (or multiple) submission of the same paper and b) pay travel costs from ...


6

If you are not a professional mathematician I'm not sure why you're interested in the legitimacy of a math journal. (That may sound elitist. It is not intended to be: really, I don't understand why someone else would need to worry about this.) If you are then you should be able to look at a journal's webpage and evaluate it yourself. Wondering whether a ...


4

If you follow the link of the impact factor it takes you to this page: http://cirworld.org/if and at the very end of the page you can see that Impact factor is calculated with process of IF calculation procedure of CIR. So the impact factor you are looking at is not the actual Thomson Reuters IF (I cannot check at the moment if it is included in the list ...


6

The Journal of Advances in Mathematics and its publisher are mentioned in this blog post at Scholarly Open Access. The post explains why the post's author, Jeffrey Beall, believes that the journal and its publisher are not legitimate.


4

With book proposals most authors submit proposals to several publishers at once and then negotiate with those that are interested in the book project. There's generally no clause that says "You cannot have submitted this for publication elsewhere." Although you can submit a completed manuscript along with your proposal, many publishers will just want to ...


19

Yes, your reputation is diminished, because people will think you couldn't get published any other way. It will actively harm your chances at pretty much any interaction with reputable organizations, including grant proposals. Don't do it.


6

Yes, one you've been rejected, you can submit elsewhere. The best way to proceed is to take the feedback you got in the rejection letter seriously, which will usually lead to one of two actions: If you got an editorial rejection without review due to problems in scope or significance, then pick a better suited journal (usually more narrowly focused on ...


10

Hi, do you think we can get my work so far published as an article? If the answer is no: So, what else do you think we would have to do to get it publishable? Professors and supervisors are human beings. They won't eat you if you make the wrong question, or use a slightly unproper tone. Don't worry specially when you are in a very low risk ...


0

When you create code based on an existing implementation, this is referred to as porting, and the code is considered a derivative work covered by the "derivative works" clause in the software license of the original. For the code written in an executable language, that is generally the copyright you need worry about, not the copyright of the publication ...


1

There are three basic routes that you can take for close incremental improvements of this sort, depending on timing and the complexity of the work to be described. They are: If the improvement is relatively simple (could be fit into the existing paper), and is completed before the camera-ready deadline of the conference, then the best thing to do is to ...


5

One idea is that you can perform some formal or informal interviews with parties involved in the subject of your research / interest. This is pretty much a standard research method for qualitative studies. Then, you can reference those interviews in a traditional way (in accordance with your preferred publication style guide), in addition to placing them in ...


0

If you are still working on your system I would say hold onto it. If the subsystem improvement only change values and can be explained briefly I would say include it in the paper when you receive the reviews. If the conference/journal asks for a review answer mention it there. All in all, I wouldn't advise submitting another paper this close to the other ...


6

If I understand your approach correctly, you want to write a (weak) research paper basically as an excuse to publish a data set. Your hope is that people will review the paper and get persuaded by the valuable data to accept it despite relatively uninspiring technical content. Further, you hope that your data set will actually lead to substantial impact, ...


9

Make your paper a data paper, and add in the bit about the simple algorithm into the introduction. That way, you put your data front and centre. And then see the answers to Data publication basics - where, why, how, and when should I publish my unpublished data? for how to release the data for the whole community to access: doing this is almost always a ...


1

The path to publication at a company strongly depends on whether the employment contract includes a "we own your dreams and family photographs" clause. Some technology companies insert such a clause, essentially claiming rights over anything that their employees do that could possibly create intellectual property. If you are faced with an employment ...


35

Aside from giving excellent talks at important conferences, here are several other ideas. I've seen all of these work (although rarely all for the same paper). Maintain a freely available copy (or at least an arXiv link) on your personal web page. Keep your CV up to date, including links to freely available version of all your papers. Make sure Google ...


1

Regarding strategy for assigning a DOI, my personal preference is to use my university library's repository for that. I prefer to use my own university's repository as the canonical source of bibliographic information about my publications to remain maximally in control of it. My university library happens to be able to assign DOIs. I realise that not all ...


25

The fundamental ethical principle is that you shouldn't waste people's time. This could be applied differently, depending on the circumstances: If you knew there were mandatory fees you couldn't afford, then it was unethical to submit the paper. The damage is already done (assuming you really can't pay the fees), and now you should apologize and withdraw ...


6

Go to conferences and give talks that describe the results in the paper, giving the citation as part of your slides. In disciplines where conferences are not primary publication venues, there's no real worry about the conference paper duplicating the journal article because there's usually no conference paper at all. There are plenty of big conferences that ...


1

About this 20% rule, I am not sure that it applies anymore even in Google. Moreover, big companies (e.g., Apple) do not necessarily allow people to publish, unless the employee's manager (and sometimes up to the top of the company) allows it (they want to actually be sure that you do not disclose valuable business information outside of the company). So, ...


1

It seems that what you are looking for is a peer review. This is the first step after you submitted your work to a scientific journal that covers your field of work. Its purpose is to ensure the quality of your work and the contribution it makes to ongoing research. This said, in order to publish something in a scientific journal, you should have brought ...


-1

To your first query, the candidate can submit the extended summary of his thesis to a scholarly journal. And more likely of it is not to be rejected, basis the fact that it is a summary of thesis, leaving other selection criteria aside. I belong to a finance background and got the extended summary of my PhD Thesis, post submission of my thesis in an ...


4

Basically it should be fine. In my own experience large publishers (Springer, BMC etc) have outsourced the proofing process or at least a separate division does it. After Editor has viewed your paper along with possible revisions made proposed by the reviewers, the paper is usually moved to the people doing the proofing. Theoretically, you could make any ...


5

In my experience, this is usually fine, as long as your changes are fairly minor and localized.


1

It is always a good idea to declare and provide access to similar or overlapping content, even if the current work is significantly different from the previously published ones. That way, it is clear that your intent is right and you do not wish to deceive or pass off parts of a previously published work as an original study. I'm not sure if translation or ...


3

It's always best to err on the side of openness, particularly when dealing with a venue that is particularly friendly to expanded publication like IEEE. Even when the new version is very different, if parts were previously published, I upload and explicitly mention those parts. When most of a publication is new (as it sounds like is the case for you), ...


5

I recommend the first option: piecing together scraps sounds like a fair amount of work to get something that will probably be less useful to the reader than what you currently have. If you are in a field in which arxiv publication is at all common, the practice of posting an extended version on the arxiv should be received non-negatively by everyone. (And ...


4

While I'm not too familiar with the IEEE publication process, in particular, the common sense tells me the following. Since your manuscript in its present form is "significantly different" from the previous versions, it very well makes sense to simply submit the current version as an original publication. However, it would be nice (and right - in order to ...


7

Do not change the order as it appears on the publication. If you are officially a co-first author, by some declaration in the paper or elsewhere, such as an * with the comment that 'these authors contributed equally, you can do the same on your Resume by having a * claiming you are a co-first author.


14

Since you write that you are co-first author, I assume you are from a discipline where authorship order matters (e.g. life sciences), and then the answer is NO. In fact, this may be seen as purposeful misleading. The authorship order is essentially part of the paper and how it is indexed. And if authorship order in your field does not matter, why would you ...


13

What field are you in? In mine (theoretical computer science), conference papers get rejected all the time: the better conferences tend to have acceptance rates of around 25-35%, and acceptance or rejection is a lot more random than you probably think (thanks to ff524 for the link). It's easy to judge what the best papers are, and accept those; it's easy to ...


4

It's not extremely common, but you can find significantly extended versions of published papers out there on arXiv, authors' websites, and the like. And at least in my filed of research it doesn't seem like that big of a problem to post an extended version after publication if there is a merit and clear reason to do so instead of cramming everything in one ...


0

Arxiv or not, adding the material to the online supplement if possible is a good idea. If you want the 14 page paper to be available as written, post it to the arXiv. When the short version is published, make clear that it's a longer version of the published paper. If you want the arXiv post to act as an honest pre-print, then there's no point in ...


21

For the first question: When the chapter is really just your paper (reformatted), I would go with what you already suggested; begin the chapter with a small text saying "The content of this chapter has been published in ...". If it is an extended version, then "The content of this chapter is an extended version of ...". Regarding the second question: first ...


45

In short, no. In long, this is a normal stage of going through a PhD: nobody gets all of their work published all of the time. The best case scenario is that the reviewers have given you some useful feedback to work with, in which case now you're in a better position than you were before. Worst case, you got a flat reject with no helpful feedback (which ...


0

Ok a couple of things for me; Firstly just because it's published doesn't mean it holds academic calibre. To quote an old lecturer of mine - "Some of the most popular papers are popular because they're wrong". If anything its a point of conversation if in your CV you've declared you're papers and also offers them a location to go and find, read then ...


5

Within many sub-disciplines of Computer Science, conference proceedings, rather than journals, are the main publishing venues for new research. In contrast to journals, which have an impact factor, there is no unified metric to quantify the quality of a conference proceeding. Although there are indeed a number of categorizations, I haven't seen them actively ...


3

It is normal to correct things that are essentially typographical errors at the last minute (page proofs), with the usual caveats about not making typographically-big changes (ones that could change pagination). Changing the definition of a variable sounds more like a change of substance (even if it only involves changing a few words), meaning that there ...



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