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-1

You need to check your university's policies on the faculty/student authorship question: your professor/s may have every right to use your work in this way, which used to be standard academic practice. Standard copyright/intellectual property rules may be waived or not applicable to your situation.


1

CC licences are incompatible with arbitrary restrictions Paragraph 2. of the copyright transfer agreement that you cite allows you "... to give permission to third parties to republish [...] provided the APS-prepared version is not used for this purpose, the Article is not republished in another journal, and the third party does not charge a fee." Offering ...


1

First you should discuss the matter with a trusted colleague or two to check that they agree with you. This is a heavy accusation and before doing anything you should check that you haven't missed anything and that there aren't other plausible explanations. You may very well be right, but it's also easy for one person to make an error without outside ...


2

I don't think you can use any CC license with such a publishing agreement. Point 4 allows you to post the article to preprint servers. This covers the non-exclusive distribution license that Mangara mentioned in a comment: You permit arxiv.org to reproduce the article on their website. Importantly, you don't grant any rights to anybody else with this ...


13

Once reviewers reports have been returned, the editor has to assess the reviews in light of the paper and provide the author with indications on how to proceed. Exactly how this come through will differ between fields and editors. The main point, however, is that a certain amount of work is usually needed to process the reviews before passing the manuscript ...


3

When thinking about contacting an editor you need to consider the costs and benefits. In all but the most extreme circumstances (where the editor has completely lost track of your submission), the the editor is not going to be happy about a request for a status update. Responding to status update requests are in general not a huge deal, but they essentially ...


14

A week is not a long time for an editor to take a decision. He might need to go through the paper in more detail than previously, in order to check on the reviewers' criticism. It might even be that the reviewers have diverging opinions or brought up some points that need further clarification, so that the editor needs to seek further advice. If the overall ...


10

No, there is absolutely no need to send a reminder after one week. The editor might be busy or on vacation or whatever or, maybe, he is deciding that he needs further reviews to decide.


-5

What college did you go to? Your thesis was done at a University/College under the instruction of your School. They have a clause in all Universities in England which states that any ideas you come up with/Develop at University belongs to the university itself. This is how the vast majority of Uni's make money by selling patents. Usually the University will ...


2

Without knowing the whole story in detail, I would just say that if you contributed significantly to the work that has been published then you should be a co-author. If you are not, this may count as plagiarism (look at misleading attribution at iThenticate). It would be wise, however, to contact them to subtly enquire about the issue before throwing any ...


4

The plagiarism in any type would be discouraged and you can claim that plagiarism. The journal will investigate it and will find if it is plagiarism or not. The theses is not the property of your supervisor as it's your effort and you may publish with or without your supervisor. IEEE Introduction to the Guidelines for Handling Plagiarism Complaints. ...


2

There are many possible explanations. It might be that they considered the algorithm to be easy to find and that they just didn't think of citing you. On the other hand, if they were quite surprised by your algorithm, it's surprising that they would neglect to mention your contribution. Either way, I would try asking them, in a friendly way.


31

Whether or not the department holds the copyright to your thesis is irrelevant. Using someone else's ideas without appropriate attribution is plagiarism, period. So, if your advisor used your original, non-trivial scientific ideas (or your non-trivial description of those ideas) in his paper without attributing them to you, then he has committed misconduct. ...


4

It is difficult to give a "global" answer to this question. There is a very wide variety of PhD programs in statistics throughout the world, so much so that the overlap between two given programs can end up being surprisingly small. The closest thing to a short answer is: Yes, it helps. (Or, should!) Now, for some nuances. Any scholarly peer-reviewed ...


0

It turns out that a related survey was posted this week in this PLOS blog post on how paleontologists access the (non-open access) literature: I put together an informal, non-scientific survey. The survey asked questions about how people access the literature, the kinds of journals they can access most easily, and basic demographics. I ...


0

I use I, Librarian. It is a reference manager, kind of like Mendeley but with a free option. They have both a paid service option and a free self host option (like wordpress). It can be private and they have per paper discussion capability. For a private/semi-private group of collaborators I think it is quite decent.


8

This is not an easy question, as are many other questions about coauthorship. To an extent, all answers will be opinion-based. I am in a similar position. I work in industry but advise many of my wife's clinical & biological psychology students on statistical matters. My personal cutoff point is somewhat later than yours seems to be. I'll happily ...


5

Note — my answer is from an author's point of view with experience publishing in IEEE Transactions-type journals. Your mileage may vary. Are there any guidelines on how willing journals might be to accept papers above the word limit after revisions? The guidelines for revisions are the same as those for the initial submission; that is, there are no ...


1

I suggest these four steps: Identify your research community. The problems you are working on should have some connections with previous works. If not, it will be hard to publish your work anywhere, because it is harder to draw the attention of other researchers on your topic. You can use search engines such as Google Scholar for this purpose. It is likely ...


2

For public discussions on arXiv preprints there is SciRate. For general discussions, also private, there is PeerLibrary.


3

For a paper published in a journal you would go for errata if the mistake is minor and does not invalidate the conclusions of the paper, or for retraction if the mistake invalidates the conclusions. In your case I would contact the organizers of the conference and ask what you should do. You may feel ashamed about making a mistake that goes into publication ...


16

The things you seek from a coauthor (advice on journal selection and English usage) are not in themselves a sufficient basis for coauthorship, but rather just being thanked in the acknowledgments. A coauthor on a scholarly publication needs to make a substantial intellectual contribution by being seriously involved in the research. I do not know of any ...


8

Whatever you do in the future: do not submit the same manuscript to multiple (not even two) journals. If you have managed to get the manuscript accepted in one journal you need to immediately withdraw all others. You state you have given "personal reasons" whereas in reality you should have provided a serious excuse to the journals for wasting their time. ...


4

Several users have suggested People of the State of New York vs. Network Associates as an instance of a DeWitt Clause being challenged, and struck down, in court. However, this case is hugely misunderstood by the media, and so these answers have been very misleading. This case was an instance of a DeWitt Clause being challenged in court. However, the ...


0

The New York Attorney General got a judge to ban Network Associates' licensing terms that prevented customers from reviewing their software without permission from NA. I think this started as a consumer protection suit by the AG's office instead of a customer defending themselves after violating such a licensing term. This was in New York state court, so who ...


-5

I would recommend you to publish on arXiv.org (http://arxiv.org). It's a very solid online publication outlet, free, open access and especially popular in mathematics and other hard science disciplines. Liberal guidelines with no mentioning of restrictions in terms of color.


13

Primarily, you should really try to find out what time zone a conference uses rather than assume a specific one. As ff524 says, even if it is not on the web site, the submission site will often tell you. That being said, at least in my discipline, there are two conventions that are common: Local time at the conference location AOE (anywhere on earth), ...


39

Journals and conferences tend to have a particular standard for novelty. Some (especially high-impact journals) have a very high bar for novelty, and will only accept papers that have exceptionally high significance and novelty. Others have a low standard for novelty; they'll accept most original papers, as long as they are within the scope of the journal ...


4

It depends on the grant that you receive to do your work. Most if not all grants require you to acknowledge the granting agency. Some grants give you very specific language that you must use in your acknowledgement (ranging from the request to include the grant number and use the full name of the agency to very pedantic requests for particular wording). ...


3

Is it necessary to mention this? If research is funded by a "DoD component" (as in your example), then typically any conference or journal publication stemming from the research must be cleared for public release, must carry an appropriate distribution statement, and must carry a disclaimer similar to the one in your example (e.g. "Any opinions, ...


2

Sure, one can publish ideas before properly evaluating their value. But it depends. Your area of research might be different from mine, but I have written "position papers" papers in the past where the main purpose is to generate discussion. Then you usually have to go to the conference and workshop your ideas with other participants. So if there really is ...


0

White papers are a great way to get noticed. Many universities also offer them as resources for current students as a way to gain insight to popular concerns within the area of expertise. Just look at: http://www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/news/publications/white-papers You want to make sure that the white paper gives insight or focus to the main thoughts of ...


2

In order for a work to be scholarly, the content has to be reviewed by a group of experts in your field, tested by those peers for accuracy and then you have to find someone who is willing to publish your work. You don't have to have proof of your findings for them to be published, but the work wouldn't be considered a scholarly document. Just remember that ...


12

Generally, no. Insights are a dime a dozen. Insights with evidence are how science (social and natural) proceed. Proceeding through your bullets: You mention e-journals. Have you read the "literature" in traditional journals/books/whatever the field's standard is? There's a lot of good reason to be suspicious of e-journals, so you may not have a full ...


2

I'd go for the change. Firstly, you want it, so if you stick with the old it's always going to bug you. Secondly, if you don't, you're stuck with a professional and a personal name. Imagine, for instance, that a friend of yours meets a potential contributor and tells him to google you. If the friend doesn't know your professional name, you miss out on a ...


4

In my experience, reviews are written at the request of journal editors and are typically not initiated by the person writing them. My colleagues and I usually write several book reviews every year because our supervisor is on the editorial board of the journal and tells us to write them. As reviewers, we do receive a free copy of the book, if you consider ...


7

I would recommend sticking with what you started using, since there is no real advantage not to. That said, if you really want to change I don't think a change in first name will affect you much. Depending on the citation style, the name change won't even be visible. I don't think this particular change is anywhere near a change of last name in terms of ...


0

I think it is perfectly appropriate to contact the editors with whatever question you have regarding the submission process. But first check the information in the web site. If there is not explicit information about the time it takes to review the manuscripts in the journals' instructions for authors (or elsewhere) then you can of course contact the ...


14

I was under the impression that such a process would take at most 3-4 months. No. 3-4 months would be, in my experience, extremely quickly for Computer Science transactions. That would mean that your submission would get accepted without modifications in the first revision, which almost never happens (and even then 3 months would be very fast). 1 to 2 ...


3

I would suggest the following thought experiment. Take a day (or at least a couple of hours), and fully embrace the editor's suggestions. Think about why h/she made them, and think about how you would revise your paper to fully incorporate his/her suggestions, and in what aspects it would make the paper better. Sleep on it a couple of days. Then, if you ...


3

These two reseacher identifications fill somewhat different purposes, beside the point that one is more open (Orcid) and one more controlled (both with regard to access and data). Below, I've highlighted the main diffences I see: Orcid provides a way to connect many different types of "outputs" with your profile, both by manually adding information or ...


8

Some of the obvious ones: The ISNI initiative wants to assign unique identifiers to all "creators". (They take authors in the broad sense of individuals generating copyrightable content or something like that, since they include musicians and others.) That is about as "general" as you can want. If you want to restrict to Academia, the arXiv author ...


2

I had some similar experiences in the recent past. I still feel I am far away of being an expert in it No one can be an expert in a whole domain. Being expert/perfect is an ideal situation in my personal opinion. So in case you are not an expert, there is nothing bad in it. You admit that you are not an expert so this is a positive point, it means ...


0

Being honorable means striving to meet all the things that are expected of you. It would be dishonorable to game the system as you appear to be contemplating doing. Be honorable. It's that simple.


2

Just get the citations of each document from the Scopus database, export the results into two files, and write a Python script that does a set intersection. You can generalize this to any files. You can export the Scopus results to .csv files, and then use the csv python module to read the files. You can then have the set operation based on the title of the ...


0

One other thing to keep in mind is patent rights; a journal article would count as disclosure and invalidate a patent, whereas a thesis may or may not. Some universities have an IP office, and you should check with them if possible; they might have an ownership claim if they employed you.


1

Nobody here can say whether there are issues with your thesis. Perhaps there is something different than usual about it. The most common situation for students in the U.S. is that you can do what you like with the content of the thesis. You can submit the entire thing as a book, or you can divide it up and use it as several papers. This is not plagiarism, ...


2

Aside from the ethical problems, I would think that trying to prepare the paper for two publishers simultaneously would be counterproductive, and that the quality of the paper would suffer. Each journal has different requirements for article length, organization, style, abbreviations, and so forth. Journal requirements may overlap, but a paper prepared for ...


3

In some (many/all?) PhD programs you have to publish before being able to defend your thesis. Some PhD theses can even be composed of the published papers with some sort introduction/discussion (a colleague in the laboratory where I did my PhD did so). Of course, your PhD supervisor needs to approve it, but otherwise I think you can (and maybe you should) ...


5

Ask your thesis advisor! In most cases, the answer will be, "No. Go for it!" Schools love for their graduates to have publications. In some institutions, including the one at which I teach, the institution claims ownership in the intellectual property of student work, but even then, a derivative work that results in a publication is likely to be welcome. ...



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