New answers tagged

0

He should just use his official employer. There are lots of scientific papers from people with affiliations in industry. Most of the time, these authors are working for companies in technical fields that are at least somewhat related to the research, but not always. (I knew of somebody who was still working with his doctoral advisor doing research in ...


1

You say he feels "... that they make it look more like I just "plug n' played" without doing real research. " Well, which one is it? Did you do real research or didn't you? If you did do real research then citing the libraries is perfectly fine. And it is important, because I might read next month that there are some serious bugs in a library making it ...


4

I agree with Captain Emacs that important contributions from others should be made visible -- for ethical reasons and to make it easier for others to reproduce your research. However, it is very reasonable to restrict this to libraries which are "critical" in the sense that your work strongly depends on them, you cannot find easy replacements (i.e. it is not ...


6

You have to clarify to yourself whether you "plug n'played" or did a real contribution. Hiding the contribution of others because it diminishes your own to a level where it's questionable were not only unethical in itself, it also would have the smell of plagiarism (because one would insinuate that one did all the work in the paper which is not cited by ...


2

If googling "acceptance rate " does not yield a response, it's a good bet that the data is not online. If you are desperate about this information, you can still try to reach out to previously accepted authors, as sometimes the acceptance rate is communicated as part of the acceptance / rejection letter. That being said, I really wonder why this info would ...


0

I wish this were not true, but to be quite honest, two important things to consider are how competitive your field is and how detrimental your work will be for the editor (or their student). I had a similar case, where I am quite sure who my reviewer was. I was also aware that they were trying to publish a paper that would lose a lot of "umph" after my paper ...


0

You should, if you consider this work worth mentioning. Interestingly, this could trigger the curiosity of the reader, with if often nice when people receive hundredth of resumes. If you "have had a 20 min talk about it", I guess it could be at a conference. It could be tagged for instance with "National conference" (if it was indeed national), and the ...


1

Consider keeping your (by now somewhat known) name as your name for publications and other scientific work. If really needed, add a note that you are now/also known by the new name.


2

I wouldn't even bother to make the distinction: The paper is in, the conference date is known--especially if you make it a habit to list the month and year. List it the exact same way as if the conference had been two months ago.


6

For papers that have been accepted, but not yet published, it is common to mention them as "accepted for publication". This is similar for journals and conferences. So in your case, you could mention the paper under a section titled "accepted for publication", or you could add this information at the end of the paper entry: author name, paper title, ...


5

As the other answers say, the definitive source has to be your university, but... I can imagine that a book chapter may not count towards the number of papers, because book chapters do not necessarily include original research, but may just be a review of existing literature. In other words, you might write a review paper that makes a perfect book chapter, ...


2

Of course you should. It is well known that the best journals are in English but there are others that can be not bad and they are not necessarily written in English. In South America there are a couple of journals that are not on the top ten, but maybe on the second quartile and they have articles both in English and Spanish. Also, you worked on that ...


41

If you have published a paper, you should include it in your CV. It does not matter what language the paper is in. For the aid of people who do not speak the language, however, you may wish to include a translation of the paper title as a note, e.g.,: J. Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Gallico [Commentaries on the Gallic war], Caesar House Press, 49 BC, ...


10

While regulations may differ from place to place, I find it highly unsurprising that a book chapter would not "count" for a paper-based dissertation. The reason is that book chapters are typically peer reviewed lightly, if at all. As such, if your dissertation requirement is effectively "N peer-reviewed papers," then this book chapter is highly unlikely to ...


5

Many journals will allow you to suggest a handling editor, and pretty much every journal will allow you to specify reviewers that you believe should not review your paper due to conflict of interest. This is an appropriate situation to invoke these options. Depending on the particular forms the journal uses for submission, the right place to put an ...


4

Such rules differ from university to university and department to department. So you need to ask the persons responsible for determining whether or not you fulfilled the requirements.


3

This is a very common problem. At the moment, I am a coauthor on three manuscripts which have been waiting for the approval of three different advisors for months. Basically, faculty are overcommitted (or disorganized) and as a result do not put in the necessary effort to understand the manuscript and fix it. Often faculty have no training in writing and ...


6

Science progresses through the exchange of ideas and theories, the testing of those, and eventually the falsification of some and repeated confirmation of others. I think most scientists understand this process and that sometimes there are competing explanations for an effect that, absent conclusive evidence, are all valid descriptions and worthy of ...


2

This is something you really need to discuss with your advisor. Personally I think it may be very reasonable to include the patent application as an appendix (and the fact that you are a named inventor on a patent application is by itself quite impressive and likely to add some cachet to your thesis), but that's just my highly uninformed opinion. I don't ...


1

I prefer to classify my response to the reviewers based on issues rather than based on the reviewers themselves. Let's say reviewer 1 and reviewer 2 question the validity of your analysis, and reviewer 2 and reviewer 3 ask why you did not adopt approach X. My rebuttal would look like this: ===== START OF REBUTTAL ===== Validity of the analysis (R1,R2) R1 ...


2

While I agree with some other responses that you can try to contact the journal to have your names taken off, but I'd also like to propose another way of looking at it. First, in future do not resign so easily. Your idea is your idea and even it is not completed by you, a publication is a publication. Unless you see that the study is going to a direction ...


8

If your paper has not been slated for publication yet, you can probably change your name on it. I would contact the editor about making the change immediately. Depending on the system the journal uses, this may simply require the editor to edit your name in single file; or it may entail quite a bit more work, so you want to given the editor and production ...


2

I get the motivation to dissociate oneself from ... people one finds reprehensible, or unethical, or morally bankrupt. And yup, that acknowledgement might feel like a far-right/left organization endorsing a public person who is anything but far-right/left. One can feel "used" here, even slimed. Esp. given the common misunderstanding that being ...


0

Normally, you would compile the questions and comments of all reviewers into a complete list, and merge matching questions while you're at it. Then, you can address the points raised by decreasing order of importance, so if you run out of space (depending on the field, messages to reviewers can be restricted in length, e.g. to a maximum of a few thousand or ...


12

I too am in CS but I found the schedule of conferences to be fairly simple and I strive to submit to the same conferences each year. First, identify the handful of conferences in your field that are both reputable and aligned with your research topics. Then you can form a mental model that is made up of (A) the deadlines and (B) the prestige. For example, ...


2

There is no "definitive" source for papers - indeed, in many fields, calls for papers don't actually drive the publication pipeline at all - for example, only a very, very small percentage of my papers have ever been as the result of a call, and in both cases, it was more "Hey, this will fit really well in our special issue on $thing..." In general terms, I ...


2

Reviewers work separately, and are liable to come up with the same comments/questions. If you are supposed to address them all in one swoop, just make a list of "Question 4 by A/3 by B: Answer". Or write answers to the questions of A and B separately, noting any overlaps.


17

You can't, and you shouldn't. Authors are obliged to give proper credit to everyone who does work contributing to a paper. This is why papers must cite earlier relevant research. By failing to acknowledge you, the authors would be falsely claiming credit for your work, just as if they had failed to cite a relevant paper in which you were an author. Unless ...


11

What I do in such a circumstance is to enumerate my comments, answer the query in detail only once, and refer to the comment instead of answering more than once: Please see Comment #3 for a discussion of foo bar.


26

This is very common and there's no need to overthink it. Answer the question for Reviewer 1, and then when listing and answering Reviewer 2 questions, write out the question and answer "This is the same point as question 3 from Reviewer 1, and is addressed in my response there." You should be very sure you've addressed the question clearly and thoroughly, ...


4

Between name changes, use names, transliteration, etc., this is a rather common situation, and copyright forms are generally well designed to allow graceful handling of it. Most copyright forms that I have encountered include two separate places where you put a name: A list of the authors, in which you should write all of the names exactly as they appear ...


5

Yes, a paper acceptance may be worth updating a graduate school application. It probably won't make a difference, and the update might not even get noticed at all if your application has already been read. However, it's worth a try. Updates to your application should be submitted sparingly. Most people should not do it at all, and nobody should do it ...


5

I always list myself in all my papers as José F. Martínez. Some people are better than others at replicating the accents in citations. Search engines have become much better at matching papers to names with accents even if citations won't include them, so in terms of missing citations (e.g., Google Scholar) I don't think it should be an issue. My students ...


4

I would recommend thinking about the prefatory material like the introduction to a journal special issue: it's entirely reasonable for such a work to have its own meaningful content and own set of references, even though the work as a whole is strongly dependent on the larger work to which it is attached. I would thus recommend writing up the introduction ...


1

There is no single answer that applies to all (continental European) countries and all disciplines. Take Germany as an example. In the humanities, it is quite common not to have published a single article until some time after the PhD defense, which on average takes six to seven years. The entire process from BA to PhD is not shorter than in the US, because ...


1

As people said already, in many places in Europe you can't even start on a PhD without having done a MSc. BSc in many EU countries is not considered to be higher education. In my EU country BSc is a worthless paper. I have done a PhD in UK. You are given 3 years to do the research, 4th year is for writing your thesis. That is the theory. However in many ...


3

In many places in Europe you can't even start on a PhD without having done a MSc and a PhD is (supposed to be) 3 years. In Sweden a PhD is (supposed to be) 4 years full time work courses and research +1 year of institutional work (typically helping out in teaching BSc and MSc students). Sometimes working as a "research assistant" for some months or a year is ...


31

Probably, you have an incorrect picture of European PhDs. There are significant differences in the paths that lead to a PhD in the US and in Europe. Several of these differences have been already covered by other questions, but let me highlight those I think are the most important for what concerns your question. First, however, the usual disclaimer: ...


9

Answers will depend on the specifics of the country and the field, and possibly there are some variations by institution, as well. My experience in computer science in Germany is as follows: Doctoral candidates "start publishing" right upon starting their path to the doctoral degree. That is, they are gradually included in the publishing process: The ...


1

Thank you for all of your answers and comments. This was some bug in EVISE system. Supporting section of EVISE is trying to fix it in next updates.


1

As far as I know, no. The problem is that what you want to measure is impossible to accurately automate (even standard citation counts that Google Scholar automates are not 100% accurate) without hard-coding such information into the paper, as in Dirk's comment. This of course has some issues, in addition to being a paradigm shift for the way citations are ...


3

Stepping away from the details of your particular study, what you are more generally asking about is the distinction between studies of theory and of practice. The first paper you speak of introduces a method and demonstrates that it can work, but does not characterize its performance. The second paper would then be characterizing its performance in a ...


4

There are some journals which try to guarantee expedite review and publication processes -- typically less than one month, even 1-2 weeks, for the review process -- for short papers which can have a significant impact on rapidly developing fields. In physics, examples of such journals are Physical Review Letters (PRL) and Applied Physics Letters (APL). The ...


3

The Open Access Directory (OAD) maintains a list of funds at universities and other institutions to pay these fees for affiliated researchers. http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/OA_journal_funds Check to see whether your institution has such a fund. Check the list but also check with your institution. Help update the OAD list. The OAD is a wiki open to edits ...


0

What you can and cannot claim in a patent is a highly debated area. You should really consult a legal expert. If you're affiliated with a college or university, they probably have an office that handles these sorts of things. They'll guide you through the patent process and help cover some/all of the fees. You might not have any choice of working with them. ...


2

Editor ultimately decides whether your pseudonym is acceptable or whether any pseudonym is acceptable for the journal. But you have to be practical about the decision to use pseudonym. If some professor, even respectable and famous one, writes you a letter saying "this person published a paper titled so-and-so under a pen name called ""." would this ...


5

There is no consistent terminolgoy in this respect. Sherpa/Romeo, a database for publisher’s pre-print policies and probably as close to an authority as you can get on this matter, writes about this: The terms pre-print and post-print are used to mean different things by different people. This can cause some confusion and ambiguity. One usage of the ...


9

I see several routes to proceed, in the order in which I would suggest that you attempt them: Check if your former or current institution has an organizational affiliation with the journal that will allow you to publish there for free (i.e., the OA version of a subscription). Ask your current supervisor. They might be willing to pay despite not being an ...


2

Good god, no, avoid anything from Lambert like the plague.I bought a Lap Lambert publication online from Amazon without checking on the publisher first. It was on a topic that was relevant to my thesis and I felt I should check this book out. It's called "Aspects of Neuroses in Pat Barker's Regeneration Trilogy" by a Mona Radwan from Cairo university. I paid ...


10

From a formal or legal perspective, there is no requirement that an author do anything: you can go full J.D. Salinger and vanish into a hole if you want. From the perspective of scientific ethics and custom, however, an author is expected to share sufficient information in order to support their colleagues in understanding and building upon their work. ...



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