New answers tagged

0

Consider avoiding the problem entirely, by not providing these languages with the honor of being on your paper. The namers of these languages chose something that they realized would cause problems. Don't glorify such a mis-decision by unnecessarily polluting your good research work. You will likely elicit scorn, and compulsions to roll eyes, even if many ...


10

As a linguist, I'd like to point out that using the word fuck is very different from using the name Brainfuck. The name Brainfuck has a unique referent: it refers only to the programming language of that name. The word fuck does not have such a unique reference – it can be used to refer to all sorts of things, and while the associated concept may be ...


25

Swearing in the paper is improper, citing swearwords is not. How would ethymologists write their papers if they weren't allowed to use all the words they talk about? Here is a thesis with fuck in it, and its use is totally legitimate.


18

Name the programming languages in the abstract, and use initialisms† like BS and JSF thereafter: Abstract: The two languages under consideration are Brainfuck (BF) and JSFuck (JSF), both of which are yadda yadda yadda... The results show that some tasks are performed faster using BF than JSF, while other tasks are handled equally well. ... ...


44

I would suggest leaving the names as they are and letting the editor(s) deal with it. If the editor (or journal policy) has an issue, they will tell you what to do. If you have a personal issue with the names, then you probably would have been better served by not using the languages.


5

A (sic) after the names on first mention might suffice.


8

Depends on your audience. If you're publishing at U. C. Berkeley they may hang you out for giving in to censorship. If you're at BYU they might expel you for an honor code violation if you don't censor. On the other hand someone at Berkeley may decide that sexualizing a programming language is offensive and demeaning to women. The very nature of a ...


2

A common way to handle such a previous submission that is still under review is to create a technical report out of the previous submission, publish this report on your home page or on arxiv.org, and cite this technical report in your new paper. In this way, reviewers can take into account the previous results without needing to have this paper published ...


0

You make it sound as though doing research requires publication in a journal. I will answer just regarding publication. If you have found some journals that you might wish to publish a paper in, consider contacting the OU professors you wrote to and asking them for specific advice not abot internships but about getting your paper published. They are at the ...


7

In general, 'comments' can be comments in support or comments in disagreement. Usually people tend to only submit comment when they are moved strongly to point out a disagreement. But, as question specifically referred to Nature's "brief communication arising" (BRA) the answer is NO. The BRA notes that "Submissions should challenge the main conclusions ...


2

I've been in a similar situation before. After consulting with the conference chair, we decided to place an anonymized version of the accepted paper in a dropbox folder and cite it anonymously as our own with a link to that dropbox file in the reference. I also added a footnote in the paper to explain that this previous work is accepted but not yet ...


2

To be direct, Not always A response paper with respect to an initial paper, X, can come under one or more of the following categories. A method that can outperform what is prescribed in X An improvement over the method implemented in X A conflict of results with that of X A different approach to the problem stated in X A sequel to X by providing ...


4

Every paper, in some way, is a response to everything that it cites. You can respond in agreement as much as you can in disagreement. An improvement is a positive response and you might couch it more in terms of a follow-on or follow-up without having to be negative about the prior results.


18

There is one very easy answer to your problem. Relax. Do nothing. It's fine. Really. Your data is good, your results are interesting, people are reading your work, and you haven't found anything particularly wrong with your science. This is more than most of us can say about our first forays into publishing. That being said, maybe you should work on how ...


2

In any case, do not cite your accepted paper as somebody else's work. I've seen research presented in two parts in Conferences. Ask the organisers about that. On the other hand, I just found out these guidelines: Use the third person to refer to work the Authors have previously undertaken. e.g. "...has been shown before [Anonymous, 2007]" ...


6

I have felt the same on my first conference paper. I see two main options: publish (make public) a kind of "full" erratum, the paper as you wish it should have been written (for typos and grammar), for instance on your website, or on a preprint hosting service. Make it clear in the paper that it is an improved or corrected version of the published ...


10

You could also use Zenodo, which I personally prefer over Figshare since it is an open platform run by a scientific institution (the CERN) instead of a for-profit (compare the privacy policies of zenodo and figshare to get an idea on why this matters). They also guarantee that, should they ever shut down, they will migrate your data to another platform (and ...


11

First, make double sure that the error is on their part, not your part, or there is not another reason for the discrepancy (e.g., they're computing something slightly different, they're using different assumptions, there's a simple way to transform their answer into yours, etc). It seems reasonable sometime between now and then, to contact the authors (1 ...


6

Figshare: Files up to 5GB 20 GB private space, unlimited space for public data Get a DOI


2

I have experienced a somewhat similar situation. In our case, it was the reviewer (who had given accept with minor changes), who wanted some clarification of a figure. When we started to clarify, we found out that a mistake made that figure, another figure and some numbers wrong. What we did was to contact the editor and explained the situation, we cleared ...


0

As the saying goes, the squeaky wheel gets the grease. In my experience, it is reasonable to politely request an update after ~2 months of review. With most manuscript trackers, it is possible to see where the manuscript is in the pipeline and send a gentle reminder if the manuscript is stuck in one stage for too long (e.g. reviewer section, review, ...


4

Shameless plug: I wrote a generic OAI harvesting tool, that will harvest Arxiv just fine. It's called metha and has a few subcommands: $ metha-sync http://export.arxiv.org/oai2 This will download all data up to the last full day (it will take a couple of days). The XML API responses are compressed and places under ~/.metha directory. Metha will use ...


0

GitHub now offers citation as a service, at least with Zenodo. This guide instructs how to connect your accounts and get a DOI with your work: https://guides.github.com/activities/citable-code/


1

The customary way to do this is to refer in the manual to the paper. You are probably not allowed to copy-paste the text of the published paper. If you are concerned about the paywall, many journals allow you to use/distribute the manuscript which you submitted to the journal (prior to editing) - but you should verify this first for Nature Methods.


4

I'm surprised this is still an issue - though I guess not as surprised as I'd hoped to be. It's rather sad that there are still people out there who demand to be credited for work they haven't done. Some journals have clear guidance for what merits authorship. For example, pretty much all medical journals sign up to guidance from the International Committee ...


-1

To specifically address the "honorary authorship for your supervisor" part of the question: If your supervisor was not helpful in guiding you toward developing your publications, I believe you have a much bigger problem than your author list.


2

There's two questions here. One is about what language you should write in for the purposes of your paper (and the source code related to you paper). The other is how much you want people to adopt your code. The first is likely to have a small amount of impact on whether your paper gets accepted - in general it's the algorithm that's important, and your ...


3

Let met just get some stray observations out of the way: "Professor Bigshot" publishes a paper with flaws that are obvious to a PhD student, who knows just how to fix them and happens to know information about the status of Professor Bigshot's submissions. This "gossip" seems perhaps a smidge unseemly (although I don't want to claim that I never talk about ...


2

I think that the answer to the question in the title is that the programming language plays no role. Concerning the question if you should use Julia or/and other languages, I think that the answer depends on your goals. If you head to reproducibility, then just using Julia is totally OK. Julia is simple enough to install and fairly simple to read, so that ...


1

I agree with most of the other respondents in that you are stuck. Mitigating this is that authorship beyond the first author is often deprecated (unless you're in a field with alphabetic ordering of authors). In any case, you'll soon graduate (inshallah) and be out of those snake pit. There is, however, one option: some journals do not allow courtesy ...


15

I tend to get annoyed reading a paper that has its code examples in an atypical language for the area. I don't want to have to learn the language to understand the examples. Unless the paper is about the language and its features or advantages or disadvantages, the example code should be as straightforward to understand as possible, and using a toy or hobby ...


2

As others have clearly displayed, you have a host of options before you. In my opinion, there is only one choice (a step, if you will) that absolutely cannot be wrong: Talk to the student's adviser. My heart grows warm by reading all of the answers/responses that heavily support you and your opinion; they encourage the notion that you know what you're ...


0

Try not to overthink this. The best education anyone can get is experience, and failure is often the best teacher. As you rightly mentioned it is not your responsibility to take care of this person (it's called co-dependency when you do) and his success or failure is squarely on his/her shoulders. As a friend/colleague you can simply ask if he is ...


7

As said by Thomas in a comment, it means personal communication. Under this phrase, there can be any kind of communication: a discussion (in the university corridors, at a conference, before a couple of beers etc.), an email or whatever. The communicated piece of information might be something already published, something that is going to be published, or ...


8

He has written a paper and wants to submit it to the top conference in my field...Unfortunately, I don't think his paper has a chance of getting in. This is not a big deal. I would offer a mild suggestion that a lower tier conference might be better, but ultimately it is fine for him to learn this lesson by experience. Also, in my field anyway, ...


3

Let him submit it and let the rejection be the reality check you are talking about. If its as sub-par as you say he will get the reality check, if not, then he gets to publish. win-win?


1

The age difference does not matter. You can supervise students older than you. When you are the supervisor, you are the person entitled to make a judgement. They do not believe you? Let them submit, but make clear your name does not go on the paper, you may need to become emphatic on that (lest they try to put your name on the paper clandestinely); often ...


-3

Let us start from the assumption that a paper, whether presented to a conference or submitted to a journal, must be about new research that has not been published before. Unfortunately, I don't think his paper has a chance of getting in If you think so because of mistakes in the paper then address such mistakes and correct them, or have the student ...


5

I am not an editor of any journal, but I don't think that such a self nomination would be welcome. You do not become a reviewer because you want to become one, but because some editor thinks that you can provide a valuable review. So, to become a reviewer you have to prove yourself to know your field well, have a good overview of the field, know its ...


1

I'm in a different field, but had a similar situation. I got a paper published in a journal in a matter of 6 months (submission to publication), then followed with another paper a month later. That paper was in review without notice for 6 months. After two unanswered emails, I politely asked for a decision on publication such that I might submit elsewhere if ...


3

This is quite a common scenario. The air of confidence (or maybe arrogance) in the first year of PhD is warranted. You can only advise if he is willing to listen or accept criticisms. However, I doubt that he will at this stage. My approach would be to provide advice only when he/she asks for it. Otherwise, stay back and let the paper go up in flames; ...


85

Let's start with the obvious: I'm only two years more senior than him. You have a PhD and he has not. You have written (many) papers before and he has not. You know your craft. He does not (yet). And he can learn faster by listening to well-meaning advice from more senior and experienced people. The age-difference does not mean anything. And it seems ...


7

It's his advisor's job to set him straight on this, but if his advisor won't do that for whatever reason, you could always bring it up once as friendly advice. Something simple like "By the way, about your paper, you know you shouldn't diss other people's work without a really good reason, right? You'll make enemies. Also, it's a good paper, but X conference ...


9

The best way I've discovered to become a reviewer for a journal is to submit a paper there. In my experience this is almost always followed a few days later by a request to review a relevant article. Edited to add: I did my first reviews while a graduate student because my PhD supervisor was the editor of a journal. He would send me things occasionally ...


2

I would give a research-in-progress paper the same format as a typical research paper (using a typical format such as introduction-methods-results-conclusion). However, the content of some of the sections would be different. Using this format as an example: Introduction This would probably be similar to the introduction on your final paper, but it should ...


6

However, honestly, only around 10% of them can I finish reading completely. And the reason I gave up reading is that they have too many typos or too big bugs that I can't get away with. This raises a red flag to me. Reading scientific papers and books is hard. And this is for many different reasons (the topic is just difficult, you need some more prior ...


1

The authorship guidelines of my university says " Acquisition of funding, the collection of data, or general supervision of the research group, by themselves, DO NOT JUSTIFY authorship." However my supervisor kills me if I do not mention his name as the second author in my papers in which he did not have any contribution and he even does not know the ...


4

In some cases both co-authors can be right even if their suggestions are opposite: If a detail is included, it may be necessary to include further details, so either cut or expand. Which you do may depend on the journal you are targetting - you do have one in mind don't you? Some have a tight page limit and thus a lower expectation of the amount of ...


16

I handle conflicting suggestions as follows: Consider all suggestions for this point, work out a suggestion based on the other suggestions and send an email to all collaborators and write something like "In this respect I got conflicting suggestions namely... I would suggest to proceed as follows... because... ". It would be best to collect all the points ...



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