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3

The 2014 Nobel prize winners are husband and wife, so it really doesn't sound strange


8

Goodman, et al wrote a paper on this very topic. The first and most common type of such coauthorship is by married economists with the same surname. Prominent examples of this include Romer and Romer (2013) on monetary policy, Reinhart and Reinhart (2010) on macroeconomic crises, Summers and Summers (1989) on financial markets, Ostrom and Ostrom ...


11

I have two choices: 1) Do the small step in (P2) by merely citing the statement of the result from my recently uploaded arXiv paper (P1). Yes, do that. But as I mentioned before, the step for which I need this result is a rather small one. I'm not sure exactly what "small" means here. If you mean that it would be easy to get around this ...


9

No, there really isn't any value in you trying to pursue a correction here, given how sloppy the presentation of the articles is, and how poorly presented the linked article in particular appears to be. Basically, it would be much ado about nothing; very few people, as the commenters have pointed out, will try to take the published work seriously; even ...


1

This depends on the journal. In one journal i am involved with a cover letter is actually required and needs to contain a declaration that the manuscript is not under submission elsewhere and won't be sent elsewhere before the journal made a decision. And reviewers always get the cover letter. From a reviewer perspective i think a summary of the paper ...


12

Do you know one of the most significant papers in Computer Science (nearly 6000 citations) was written by a couple, and they continued to co-author more than 50 papers. You can check the publication records of Patrick and Radhia Cousot.


9

To add to the other answers, I think the fact that your wife does not work in academia makes it even less questionable (from my point of view this does not raise any ethical concerns since you say co-authorship is warrant by her contribution). Since she does not have an academic career, and this paper seems to be a "once-off" thing, I do not think anybody ...


5

I made a special appointment with a professor once to ask his advice about whether a proposed action would be ethical. He gave me an easy test: imagine a headline in a newspaper, reporting your action. Is there anything about that headline and story that would look questionable? If not, it's safe to go ahead with the proposed action. In this case, we'd ...


22

In terms of relationship with the external world, it need not be any problem. If you begin collaborating scientifically on a regular basis, however, it is likely to affect your relationship, by making you colleagues as well as spouses. For some couples, this can be a good thing, as the shared interest and partnership can add a new dimension to the ...


43

I know several instances where spouses/couples are co-authors, though often it is not obvious to an outsider if the co-authors are spouses. (There are also many examples of parent-child and sibling co-authors, so it is not obvious even if the spouses have the same last name.) Thus it is not a strange thing to happen, particular if non-academic co-authors ...


126

Nobody will notice or care, unless you share a last name with your wife, in which case the strongest reaction is likely to be, "aw how cute, a husband and wife published a paper together."


9

If you've been waiting for 14 months, and they are still not handling the paper, I think it's time for one last round of interaction. State that you consider 14 months to be an unacceptably long time to have no response to reviews. State that you intend to withdraw the paper and take it elsewhere unless they can give you a firm and near deadline (no more ...


10

At least for the journals I've refereed for, the referees don't know how long it took the authors to resubmit. Since I don't know when the other referees submitted their reports, I don't know when the authors received the reports, so I don't know how long it took them to revise. Maybe the authors took three months to revise; maybe they spent 87 days waiting ...


13

The other answers are very good. I'll add that a good referee should review what's submitted, and make recommendations about what's on the paper in front of them. Let the editors worry about everything else. I try not to let the timeliness of the resubmission impact any recommendation. That said, I appreciate it if the authors can turn it around while ...


0

Nowadays when referees interact with the journal on-line, the cover letter (if any) will be available to them. (Of course you send it electronically to the journal, right?) No praising.


6

It actually depends on the precise semantics of "revise and re-submit". In some journals i was involved with, three different responses were possible: a minor revision is of a mostly editorial nature and people expect that this can be done quickly. A major revision usually comes with a timeframe of four to six weeks and often requires more substantial ...


74

Opinions might differ, but here is mine: as a regular reviewer for a bunch of journals, what impresses me is a resubmission that addresses whatever points I raise in my review in a thorough and convincing way, irrespective of whether the authors take one week or six months to write it up. The more seriously you take my review, the more seriously I will take ...


15

You -- and your co-author -- have, most likely, assigned your copyright in the paper to the publisher. Without knowing all the details of your copyright agreement, your copyright agreement seems to allow you, and your co-author, the right to re-use the work, and that right applies to each of you separately. The right to re-use the work requires you to ...


1

I don't think that it matters who created that figure or any particular internal to the paper artifact. The copyright AFAIK applies to the paper as a whole (would it be a data set, things might be a bit different). Since the paper is a joint work (legal term), even though you're a first author (academic term), from a legal standpoint, you are a co-author ...


3

I've never heard of religious bias existing in academia. You might face problems if your field is closely related to religion and you are expressing views that are fanatic and not based on clear reasoning or evidence. However, apart from that, I don't see any reason why journals would not accept papers written by members of a particular community. However, ...


1

In the UK (at least at one university), apparently one of the "boxes to tick" on the examination form is "is this publishable" - hence having at least one paper is considered good practice to have that box ticked. - However there is no explicit requirement to publish papers to obtain a PhD and people have obtained PhDs without submitting papers. The reality ...


2

I agree that there is no single right answer. This is just an additional issue to consider. There is some advantage to publishing at least one paper while still a graduate student. There is a process to matching up target venue and paper content, preparing a paper for submission, submitting it, and taking it through review and revisions. It varies depending ...


4

There's no single right answer here. For instance, if your department allows you to submit a "stapler thesis" that consists of submitted and published manuscripts, then it makes all the sense in the world to write the papers and then submit them as your thesis. On the other hand, if you can't do a stapler thesis and have to submit your thesis in just a few ...


5

Absolutely, sometimes bad work gets published that shouldn't get published. To pick one particularly notorious case off the top of my head, consider the case of Jacques Benveniste's "water memory" article in Nature. Likewise, sometimes good work has a hard time getting published. To adulterate Churchill's famous quote on democracy: No one pretends that ...


17

I want to address part of the question, because I think there's an important comment on the nature of such accusations. The "this [bad thing that happened] was because [person or group X] is prejudiced against [group Y with which I'm affiliated]" trope is one that I've heard for many, many years, in part because I am part of multiple such groups Y which ...


2

I think there is some confusion in this question stemming from the notion of "official invitation." Unless you have some odd bureaucratic requirement that you have to fulfill in order to submit, requesting an official invitation seems odd. I think that the notion you are actually trying to get at is what is more typically referred to as a presubmission ...


16

You should never submit a paper without the active consent of the co-authors. If your advisor is a co-author (and they probably will be for work based on your Masters thesis), then you definitely must have their consent to submit. You can do most of the writing yourself, if you want, since you probably have more time to devote to this than your advisor, ...


4

Personally, I do not write papers for the sake of pride. I write papers to convey the science I have produced. The impact factor (IF) is relevant only in the sense that peers tend to read higher IF journals more than lower. At the same time, anyone searching for science on the internet will get hits regardless of the IF of the journals in which it is ...


2

Yes, you can. What sort of reply you will get is, however, uncertain, probably ranging from no reply to a kind explanation of what applies. Invited reviews are just invited and the way the journal editors make the choice varies. I am sure the term Invited review is used varies from the case where every published review is though of and invited by the ...


1

Is it a valid inquiry from my side? NO. Invited reviews are the word "invited" means. The other party invites you to write a literature review paper because of your great expertise. You do not invite yourself. If you are Mr.Nobody, the whole effort of self-inviting will be embarrassing for you. That does not mean that you should not actually proceed ...


5

I'll add another example to the several already given. There are a number of journals (e.g. some or many of the Letters on...) which have a somewhat fast review process, in order to publish results on "hot topics" in a relatively short time. However, to publish in those kind of journals, not only does your work have to be on-topic, original, innovative, ...


6

I wish to publish my hobby research and I doubt this is something my project supervisors, or university would be interested in. Well, why not. As long as it does not interfere with your day-to-day work, I would not assume that your advisor has quarrels with that. However, note that e.g., going to conferences might be tricky. In a bad case, you'll need ...


17

This is something that you need to discuss specifically with your advisors. They may or may not be interested in the publication—but they may also have an interest in ensuring that your goal of publishing doesn't interfere with your paid work. (For instance, spending a lot of time editing your "hobby" manuscript when you should be working on your talk for an ...


5

One of the most common cases for being out of scope for the journal in such a case is that the paper is not at the right level of the theory-practice scale. In particular, an application paper can make use of a lot of concepts of earlier theoretical work. Yet, that doesn't meant that the application paper is in scope. If the readership of the journal most ...


18

Cape Code has given a good answer, but it's not the only possibility for such a rejection. Suppose you publish a paper in, say, "Topology and Its Applications", in which you prove some topological result using (among other things) a set-theoretic lemma. And suppose I later prove some result in algebra using (among other things) your lemma. Of course, I ...


8

Citing articles form a given journal does not automatically mean your paper is in its scope. Even if the subject and methodology of your work seem similar to the ones of the articles in a given journal, the scope can also include quality criteria. As an example, Nature Chemistry, in the description of its scope says: Nature Chemistry is committed to ...


16

In my entire scientific career, I have seen religious belief come up precisely once: an (apparently Christian) author closed a paper with "AMDG," which apparently stands for Ad maiorem Dei gloriam. Of the set of three peer reviewers, one ignored it, one was confused by it, and one asked for it to be deleted as irrelevant to the substance of the paper. The ...


4

It depends – on your content or type of research as well as on your approach to writing. The two approaches to (scientific) writing I would like to distinguish are: Start with writing a quick draft and then revise and restructure it many times. Start writing with a clear structure in mind and try to optimise every sentence from the beginning. In my ...


2

I also have a very common name (usually quoted along the lines of "Smith, J.") and despite the fact that I have worked and published with two different institutions there has never been a problem assigning all my papers to me personally (ORCID and other system let you take your institution(s) into account). As long as there isn't a person with the same ...


16

It's plausible that there's cultural bias that's correlated with religion, but it's hard to imagine that religion is actually the primary factor. After all, referees typically have at best weak indications of the author's religious beliefs. Furthermore, cultural and religious bias could play out identically in practice, which makes them near-impossible to ...


9

For me, writing a paper is a process that is not unlike how an author writes a book. I am constantly thinking about the "story" while I am doing the research. While working on a research project, I will suddenly think of some nice manner of presentation, phrase or even a single word that capture nicely some aspect of the work and I write these down in a raw ...


17

To sharpen jakebeal's point a bit: my primary specific recommendation is that you not spend any significant amount of time polishing the paper until you're confident that very nearly the sum total of its contents are collected in front of you, literally or figuratively. A more-or-less-messy pile of scratch can be enough to facilitate the process of thinking ...


46

The concept of "finished" is problematic when it comes to research. I think that the same quote applies as for art: research is never finished, it is only abandoned. Less poetically and more pragmatically, it is often only in the process of writing that certain critical aspects of the work become apparent. When a person is in the midst of working on a ...


1

Ethically, it is unwise to use large portions of a document written by a subordinate in one's group without giving appropriate credit (which in this case would be co-authorship). However, it is not the same as saying that the PI has plagiarized the earlier document, as it has not been entered anywhere into the record. Quoting a paper that has been published ...


8

Re-using text from a previous paper on which one was an author is known as self plagiarism. Opinions vary on the gravity of this sin, but it is pretty clearly not best practice. In my opinion, re-use should be allowed for descriptions of methods or presentations of proofs, provided that they are adequately flagged as such with citation to the original paper. ...


2

Here are some other sites, in no particular order. I'm not sure if any of these focus specifically on computer science though: Research Bible H-Net Conferize Conference Submit OurGlocal BrownWalker All Conference Alert List of conference.org All Conference Alerts Conferensum


6

Getting a paper accepted for publication in a normal journal is a matter of credibility: you must be able to convince the peer reviewers that the content of your paper is both true and novel. Very high status journals such as Nature or Science work somewhat differently: there you cannot reach the peer reviewers until you first convince the editor that your ...


0

Based on my experience, it is a good news that you will be hearing soon from the editor regarding your paper (although you might hear a bad news). In general, it is good to get an idea about the time frame for the journal your are submitting to. I use the Journal Finder from Elsevier (http://journalfinder.elsevier.com), which you can use to make a decision ...


3

It means just what it says on the tin - that the required reviews are complete. It says nothing about their content, and whether a paper is accepted or not, it will likely come with a number of revisions and the like from reviewers. The editor needs to read the reviews, decide whether or not to accept the manuscript (and there are several different scales ...


3

Required reviews completed means required reviews completed! Nothing more and nothing less. There are particular seasonal patterns for the journals, to be flooded with a lot of manuscripts at some times (lets say this time ~ May-June), while Sept-Oct are less hectic months. Likewise, referees, who are generally faculty members at universities, are less ...



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