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-1

you sound like you want to publish the paper. when you take the time to identify what journals it could plausibly appear in, you'll also find out your top choices. make the piece as neat and appealing as possible - have your peers go through it - and see where you can get it published. as i see it the second best thing to a journal would be submitting it to ...


2

One more thing to watch for if the format has changed, say if you submitted the paper in some garden-variety LaTeX style and the journal converted it to its own style: The new line breaks can create hyphenation errors. In general, TeX is amazingly good at getting hyphenation right, but it's not infallible. One of my papers had the misfortune that "colimit" ...


10

In general no. There may be some circumstance when it can be necessary but the proofing stage is too late for any substantial changes. The manuscript should be published in the form it has been accepted and it is an authors responsibility to provide a final version of the manuscript which ideally should not require any changes once type-set and provided in ...


2

It is not uncommon to make some changes to articles while they are in press. However, there are a couple of things you should be aware of. First, you ought to contact the editor, to find out whether there is time to insert anything. After a certain point, the publication schedule will probably not permit any changes. After that point, the editor may be ...


7

In conferences with paper bidding, reviewers get to indicate their preference for each paper (i.e. "I'm interested in reviewing this one, not interested in reviewing that one"). The bids are typically based on the abstract (which is why many conferences have an "abstract submission deadline" before the submission deadline). That way, by the time the papers ...


2

In addition to jakebeal's answer, let me address the "How to propose that change?" question. Surely the requirement to have work indexed at Scimago and Scopus was instantiated to have some "measurable" guideline -- the initiators of the project probably wanted to avoid any discussions on what papers should count and what shouldn't later. While this is ...


0

A priori you own the rights. But you may have transferred them to the University (when signing a study agreement) or to a project (e.g. when you thesis is e.g. financed by an EU project) or to a company financing your thesis. Most Universities do, nowadays, give the copyright to the PhD student.


7

If you publish traditionally, you make it much more likely that the audience with the background to understand your work and an interest in the topic will find it and read it. The very fact of making it past the gatekeepers of traditional publishing serves as an advertisement of the quality of your work. I say this based on personal experience from years ...


20

I don't have time to look at your work in detail, but I have at least skimmed through parts of it. I would recommend against self-publishing if you hope for mainstream acceptance of your work (but if you don't care about that and self-publishing would make you happy, then go for it). What you write looks like mathematics, not the sort of nonsense one ...


31

Should I publish it traditionally or self-publish? Why do you want to publish at all? You answered I write the book to store down my research results and to spread my new knowledge. To make money is not the main aim, but it would be nice. Given that: the answer is that you should certainly not self-publish your work. You can store your results ...


28

I've pointed many benefits of self-publishing. What are drawbacks (except of pointed by me)? The scientific community will very likely ignore your contributions. That is, your book will have approximately zero impact. The combination of "I speak in a bold voice" and "I did not let my work get peer-reviewed" screams "crank" to professional ...


6

Your mathematics might be wrong, and since you're too close to it and too steeped in it, you might not notice.


7

Computer science is typically badly under-represented in the "traditional" citation indices, which do not consider conferences to be peer-reviewed publications. As any computer scientist knows, that is a bad joke: many computer science conferences are much more stiffly reviewed and difficult to enter than most journals. It is for this reason that DBLP ...


13

You do, until you sign the rights away. This is regardless of whether you have a copyright page, thanks to the Berne Convention. Note that depositing it in the library does not waive any of your rights. You do transfer some rights when you deposit it through ProQuest but 1) you didn't mention doing so, 2) the form you would have signed if you had done so ...


32

Did you sign an agreement to transfer copyright to someone else? Does your university policy (example) or employment contract specify that someone else holds the copyright to your thesis? If the answer to both questions is "no" then you, as the author of the thesis, hold the copyright. In the US, most university students retain the copyright for their ...


4

I agree entirely with Jukka. Your institution pays librarians to do this for you, go give them something to do ;-) (Plus, theses are interesting and librarians like a challenge. I much prefer getting a request for a thesis, or something like a pre-revolutionary Russian publication, than for an article in a recent journal...) So as to add something useful ...


5

The same way you can access almost any other publication that does not seem to be available online: ask your local university library. Interlibrary loan works very well, also internationally. Most likely you can get fairly quickly photocopies or scans of the thesis. You do not need to locate a copy of the thesis yourself; you do not need to browse any ...


9

You could use ProQuest for free at the British Library. Obtaining theses in the Reading Rooms: North American theses ProQuest Dissertations & Theses is available online on the electronic resources terminals in Humanities - Floors 1 and 2. http://www.bl.uk/reshelp/findhelprestype/theses/hrrtheses/theses.html


10

In general, one could also just write a polite e-mail to the author of the thesis requesting the file (and making it clear that you need it for your research). Unfortunately, in this particular case I was not able to find the author's e-mail by googling. As a truly very last resort one could try to contact the thesis advisor (which in this particular case ...


7

There are a number of ways of accessing American PhD theses. Many, possibly most, US PhD theses are are archived at ProQuest (cf. this question for more about them). In some cases there may be an embargo period before which the thesis will not be available. Some universities have subscriptions to ProQuest allowing you to download the theses from them for ...


2

I would revise and resubmit. Not only that, I would implement as many of the harsh reviewer's comments as feasible and truly warranted. At least it will show that you are taking the journal and its personnel seriously. Remember, only one of the two said "reject". Show a good faith effort to satisfy both of the reviewers. Keep up the effort my friend!


4

First, remember reviewer's "verdicts" are only recommendations. The handling editor evaluate these reviews along with your original submission to see what is a fair balance. Deviating reviews are not uncommon. Editors have two solutions at their hands, either, as in your case, make a decision based on the two, or to add a third reviewer to the mix. The ...


1

You should cite the final article where possible. If the article is online but not yet in print, you should cite the DOI which is a permanent resource and will be updated by the publisher when the print volume is announced, so anyone linking to the online version will get the published version. I have noticed some journals taking up to 9 months to assign a ...


18

one of the reviewers suggested minor revisions. The other reviewer on the other hand recommended a rejection and his comments were really unfair. Welcome to peer review. Yes, it sucks to have a reviewer criticise your work so much, especially if you feel the comments are unfair. However, both, the editor and the other reviewer seem to give the ...


12

Yes, you should revise and resubmit, if you still want the article to be published in the journal you originally targeted. Evidently, he hasn't bothered reading the article completely. This may be true, but once you've waited a day or two and digested the comments, look at it again. This kind of review might highlight that some readers of the journal ...


27

Most journal articles are often a revise and resubmit before they get published.The final article that you see in journals is often never the first submission attempt but rather, crafted through continuous revising and editing. You should revise and resubmit, you would be doing yourself a disfavour if you don't. The editors had two very contrasting ...


2

I would not put the original source ("John Doe, private communication") in my bibliography, because, as you noted, it gives the false impression that I was the direct recipient of the communication. Rather, I would include the textbook ("Jane Roe, "Introduction to Astrology", Predator Press, 2010") in the bibliography and then write in the body of the paper ...


7

This is a very odd situation, and you may want to consider carefully whether to use the source, per Nate Eldredge's comment above. If you do want to use it, however, I would recommend citing the textbook, but mentioning their original source in prose: blah blah context context, per the table in [citation of Textbook], as attributed to [their source]. ...


1

Most journals allow (and even expect) you to upload supplementary data with your submission, which can be accessed by the reviewers. If you are submitting to a journal, this is the best way to make it accessible as part of the reviewing package, as well as to ensure long-term storage of an archival copy of the relevant data. On the other hand, if you are ...


0

What you could do is to host your data on Dropbox. When you try to share a file, you will get a link that you can put into the paper. It seems as if the recipient of the link has no way to see the dropbox user account name/e-mail address of the person who shared it. After acceptance of the publication, you could move the file to your institutional website. ...


3

Checking your reference list and discussing with your advisor and senior colleagues will definitely help you shortlist a few journals suitable for your study. Once you have this list, try to figure out the best match for your paper in terms of journal scope. Also keep in mind the study design while selecting your journal. Some journals publish only original ...


0

The manuscript status shows "required reviews completed" once all the reviews have come in. After that, the paper along with the reviews could be waiting at the editor's desk for a while before he has time to look at them. This would probably account for the status having remained the same for two weeks. For many journals, the status would change to "with ...


8

A few steps can help. Check your reference list. Where have others writing on similar topics published? you will end up with a list of reasonable journals. The next step can go in one of two ways,, either you chose a high impact journal on the list and take a chance it will be published there or you try to assess where your paper would best fit. The first ...


2

In general, yes. The time for the review process varies between journals and between fields. you should, first of all try to assess what is normal for your field and particularly of the journal to which you submitted your work. For me as Editor-in-Chief of a journal in the Sciences, it seems long but not unheard of. I have had rare cases where I have had ...


7

An educated guess is that the manuscript handling system by default expects two reviews. The number of reviews required for a decision can usually be changed by the editor. A reason for adding reviews is that you receive, for example and in the worst case, one accept and one reject from the two reviewers. It is therefore reasonable for an editor to search ...


1

The gist may be that your claim is modest and needs further substantiation/proof. Increasing the n of samples (or including meta analysis) would increase the strength of the argument without lengthening the word count of the paper significantly. Shortening the paper will help tighten the argument, making the claims clearer, and from the journal's ...


2

Others have mentioned, but it bears repeating - citations are not necessarily positive. Plenty of papers use faulty methodologies and are cited as examples of what not to do. Also, at least within the social sciences, citation is correlated with age and 'first mover advantage'. Because any academic paper worth its salt is going to cite previous work on the ...


1

In addition to the other good answers, four good reasons noone's mentioned yet: Not every student/research partner/ visitor will have an academic login or online access to journals/JSTOR/proceedings/whatever, or in that discipline. That stuff costs big bucks. Especially people from industry, prospective students, auditing students, people from other ...


4

There is certainly no problem contacting an editor to enquire about a manuscript and review responses. It is difficult to assess the issue in your particular case but I do agree that adding new data can be a significant endeavour indeed. Shorting the paper may be a relevant point in any case but I do not see, in general how, shortening a paper would improve ...


0

The Ronin Institute aims to facilitate precisely this type of independent scholarship. Its members include a number of very accomplished scholars who not do have university appointments yet publish regularly in top journals. Doubtless this is not the easiest route, but it clearly is not impossible either. That said, the original question suggests that the ...


4

My experience is that this is mostly done to communicate new publications and general scientific progress to the rest of the department. Specially in larger departments that cover different sub fields, this is a way to externalize what everyone is doing. Posting the abstract/first page of a published paper in the communal area was encouraged and widely ...


3

tl;dr. It only works under certain conditions. There is actually a whole field of study that explores the scientific process via publication metrics, it's called bibliometrics. It is true that citation count within a field is sometimes used as a proxy to estimate an article's quality. See for example this recently published study about peer review: ...


5

I think that one has to distinguish different kinds of failures, and also see if the field is experimental or not. If you have done experiments and they show that some approach does not work, it is perfectly fine to publish that (although, as is discussed in various places, you often do not get the credit that you deserve for this). If your work is ...


5

Who can say for sure but the professors in question? It may simply be a cheap and considerate way of letting interested colleagues or students have access to a hard copy, avoiding both the inconvenience of continually being asked to provide one or the awkwardness and waste that comes with offering a copy to one who doesn't wish to read it. A habit retained ...


5

I used to see this all the time in my undergraduate university, so I know just where you're coming from. While I never asked specifically about them, I may have an answer based purely on my experiences. Whenever I had a meeting with one of my professors, I would usually arrive a couple minutes early and the professor would usually be finishing up their ...


3

When it is the right thing to do, I am comfortable with putting a whole paragraph in a footnote and have done so. The ideal option, however, which some journals will let you do, is to have a sidebar or boxout. This has the same segregating effect as an appendix, but keeps the material closer to its reference.


11

There are sometimes "remark" blocks that some authors use for discussing aspects that are of substantial interest to some readers but do not strictly belong to the core of the story that you are telling. If you are preparing your document with LaTeX, then such text blocks are called "environments". An example is given in the Springer Lecture Notes in ...


2

In math, it commonly happens that, for whatever reason, an unpublished work gets cited several times. (This is rather annoying when it is something useful but not easily accessible, though this is not quite your case.) I think that whether you can easily publish it depends on how similar the work is now to published work. A collaborator and I were in a ...


1

I would attempt placing it in a journal. You did the work and I'm assuming you came up with the first, greatly improved proof. You also have citations so it must be important to someone other than you.


-3

I agree. It sounds somewhat ridiculous and archaic. My first attempt at an answer would be pride/arrogance or desire to impress. You know what I would do? If I were a professor on the same cell-block as the other professors, I'd deliberately not hang anything up on my door except my business card with my own personal web site address where all my papers are ...



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