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0

As with any style question, work through these rules from the top, and stop when you have an answer: Read the style guide / advice to authors carefully, and follow its advice. It will often contain the answer. Ask your editor / supervisor, and follow their advice. Copy the style from recent works that are in the same category as yours; so if yours is a ...


1

Transparency to your users is necessary - not necessarily sufficient - for this to be ethical. Include a "license," that says "read at your own risk, I'm pretty sure my results are right, but they are not peer reviewed and are subject to the standards of no prestigious journal besides my own!" You are unaccredited, so don't try to look accredited! If you ...


8

I think the answer is yes, but you should aim higher: the line you're drawing in the sand is uncomfortably close to you and that's causing more work for you than is necessary. Namely, trying to put the essential content of your papers on your own website for the purpose of freely disseminating your work seems wrongheaded: instead, you should be putting your ...


0

Both answers are excellent, I would like to add that today is too soon to answers because we don't know how the publication system will evolve. Right now, we are following a traditional, centuries old system in with scientists gain reputation from their publications, which in very recent years were (and in some countries and some disciplines still are) ...


-1

Let me build upon excellent Wrzlprmft's answer, adding a few things: there is a de facto open access standard license, and that is CC-BY. It is similar to public domain, and I'd suggest not to use CC0, as you would waive also the attribution of your work. CC0 it is used for databases and data, where CC-BY licenses are tricky. institutional or disciplinary ...


6

My idea of how to evaluate the candidate is completely orthogonal to what you are asking. 1) What counts towards evaluating your research potential is what you proved and what tools you developed. You can put 15 theorems into one paper, and the theorem count will still be 15. You can repeat the same idea in 20 different variations in 20 papers and the idea ...


1

I tend to motivate this mainly with two facts: As science advances and topics become more complex, research papers become more specific, so that one may need to put together many "little" pieces in order to deduce and/or motivate new insights. Thanks to the internet and more advanced channels of communication, it is nowadays easier to discover and exploit ...


4

In a CV you try to organize your important personal information in a clear and useful way for others to see and gain a god perspective. In this case you have a thesis. It should clearly be listed so that it is clear it is one of the outcomes of your degree. It is commonplace for people to turn a thesis into papers but that usually involves rewriting the ...


7

The time frame to a point where a question can or indeed should be sent varies depending on the typical time for that journal, or of similar journals in your field. To me 2.5 months does not sound too long, a decision after one month sounds very quick if I consider a normal set of reviewers also should make their evaluations in that period. If you think ...


4

With time number of publications will be almost everything. The quality of the publications is usually determined by the impact factor of the journals in which they are published even though this under no circumstances is a guarantee for the quality. Now someone may easily object to this description but the point is simple. As a senior researcher you will ...


10

jakebeal has pointed at the more technical reasons for the increase of references. We should, however, not forget some of the more subtle, but perhaps also, more fundamental changes that has happened. First, there is a gradual change in how science is communicated. Scientific papers have developed from letters that were read aloud in front of scientific ...


11

I need to disagree somewhat with the other answers posted. Publication quality is very important. Do not, however, confuse quality of a publication with the impact factor of the venue where it is sent. If you have completed a piece of work that is significant for a narrow community, then you should publish it in an appropriate place for that community to ...


8

Contemporary publications definitely cite more sources. There are likely quite a number of different forces in play, and I think that you have touched on a number of them in your question. In my experience and opinion, however, much of it can be derived from the basic purpose of citations: to acknowledge the context and foundations of a piece of work. ...


4

Coming from the marine sciences field, the impact factor (prestige) of the journal where you publish is more important than the number of papers you're able to churn in the short-term. I know a post-doc who has published at least 5 papers in 3 years describing new species in different, but rather obscure, journals. This same person shared with me that he is ...


3

Because as time goes on, more and more research is performed, and knowledge is accumulated and published. Early on, the literature is not abundant. Also, it is easier to identify and locate relevant literature now.


14

I don't know what publication rates are typical in computer science, but in mathematics it is true that quality is more important than quantity, when it comes to getting postdocs and competitive research positions. This does not mean quantity is irrelevant. But postdocs are partially given based on your promise as a researcher. To that end, one truly ...


0

A partial answer: You can check if the ISSN is 'fake' or not at this ISSN-Validator website. It doesn't provide much useful info though. All numbers entered are either 'invalid' or 'valid' with no further information given.


1

The answer you might be looking for lies in this recent Nature News article on the most cited scholarly works of all time. Specifically, for evidence supported by real data I'd look at the Google Scholar top 100 spreadsheet file In this, you'll find Google Scholar citation data for physics-related books like: Principles of optics: electromagnetic theory ...


1

As xebtl says, assuming you cite your sources appropriately, no it would not be considered cheating, but it might be difficult to publish a paper about it. In general, an article about porting an existing package to another language might be publishable (in some computer science-related journal) if you discuss the challenges you faced and how you overcame ...


3

As long as you give proper credit (cite the previous work and make clear that your package is based on it), I do not see how publishing a paper could ever be construed as “cheating” on your part. The more likely question is if and where you could get it published. It is not dishonest to try and publish something even if you are not sure it is “worth“ a ...


4

While it (usually) isn't a deal breaker to not publish, failure to do so will hurt you in one way or another. During my defense last week, one of the committee members suggested that the work wasn't significant, and commented on lack of peer-reviewed publications. That didn't prove that the work wasn't significant, but having a journal publication in hand ...


0

Thanks to those who pointed out that Parula is the new default matlab colormap and solves this problem nicely. I will give an more general explanation of why this problem arises. A very good series of articles about colormaps can be found here. I'll consider the colormap as a series of colours in Lab space for reasons which will become clear shortly. In Lab ...


18

The expectation to publish does not depend on whether you are full-time, half-time or spare-time student, it is based on the general expectations on students in your field, department, or academic culture, or some combination. If a PhD thesis is a monograph then the main focus will be to complete such a thesis. this commonly does not preclude publishing as ...


2

For IEEE Conferences, the length of time depends on a few factors. 1) When are the final proceedings sent from the conference organizers to the IEEE indexing 2) How long it takes for IEEE to look through the submitted work 3) How long it takes for the conference organizers to respond to any IEEE issues or questions about the proceedings You can get a ...


2

For IEEE conferences (such as this one), there is a relatively standard procedure: You should have gotten your own copy of the proceedings at the conference itself: typically with IEEE conferences these days this will be on a USB drive. By the standard IEEE copyright policy, you can feel free to post your preprint on your website. The full proceedings ...


4

The straight forward answer is that you can publish the work as you see fit. A well-written sound manuscript submitted to an appropriate journal is always welcome. That said, however, your actions is not likely to smooth out any existing "conflict", for lack of a better word, between you and your advisor. And, just because one can does not mean it is the ...


-3

Most of these would depend on which journal/conference you are submitting to. For instance, IEEE and Springer each have their own style.


6

The general formatting advice from @CapeCode is sound. Generic font (certainly not anything odd) and 1.5-2 line spacing is fine for the text. Tables and figures should go at then end. Many journals ask for figure files not to be included in the manuscript file at all, follow such advise. If figures are separate all figure captions go at the end of the ...


5

At this stage, content is what you should focus on. In most biology journals, formatting is done by the publisher. Thus formatting at this stage only serves the purpose of making your draft easy to read and comment on, so to answer your questions: What font is appropriate? Times New Roman 12? If your adviser usually reads on a screen, consider using a ...


-4

All the answers seem to forget the very real fact that present publishing practices can be almost regarded as corrupt: Journals do not compensate monetarily the authors, they earn money through subscription schemes, and, as they usually belong to university programs, have supported the generalized requirement of having to be published multiple times before ...


8

A first publication matters less than you might think, especially as an undergraduate. My take on likely interpretations: If you publish as first author in a credible but low impact venue (of any type), people will think you're doing great for an undergraduate to be publishing as first author at all. If you publish as first author in a high impact venue ...


12

Use the "hot" colormap. If you use Matlab this is one of the built colormaps. I believe than in numpy and other languages you also have this colormap included. You can see in the image below, how the commonly used "jet" , the "hot" and a "gray" colormap are seen in grayscale. It can be seen that the "hot" colormap is quite good both in colour and grayscale. ...


4

The figure examples pretty much says it all, if you look at how the different hues are translated into a grey scale you will see that a two-tone scale going from a colour rendering dark in B/W to a colour rendering light in B/W would the solution. But, this is not much different from using a monochrome scale from light to dark since the boundary when colour ...


5

I think the default colour map is not that good for most cases, since having essentially four different colours can make it look different than what it is. A very clear example of what I say (and a bunch of rants why one should not use MATLAB). See the yellow stripe? It is essentially an artefact of jet, and not a property of the data (more on the post). ...


1

My short answer would be, do what you think should be done and submit it. How anyone can put a fixed, in this case, 30% new material requirement on something appears ridiculous. To imagine a good paper would be rejected because it is not 30% new creates a sense of amusement in me. Either the manuscript is publishable or it is not. It can of course be deemed ...


3

I think that there are three main cases to consider here: The web pages are aggregated data, e.g., in your example of a study that quantifies change over time. Collecting web pages as data is routinely done in scientific studies, such as complexity studies that track a lot of pages. In this case, the pages are not generally cited (and any data from them ...


0

First of all, there are two common usage cases of referring to web pages. There is use like any other reference - in which case you refer to mainly the written content on a particular web page (hopefully, and in many cases, this is dated). The other case is when you refer to a website such as academia.stackexchange.com. Websites are inherently dynamic and ...


0

Your edit contains the answer to your question: editors are people too, and sometimes delays happen because of that fact. This is less true for a "professionally edited" journal like Nature or Science, where there is likely to be a formal handoff of responsibilities between editors when one is unavailable. Most journals, however, are run by faculty ...


15

In general the editor makes choices as to how to best get a manuscript evaluated. If one reviewer did not return a review, it is only natural to ask for a new reviewer's opinion. The fact that the editor-in-Chief confers with another editor could mean that they confer whether or not the existing single review is sufficient. As for time, I am not sure why ...


12

In electronic submission systems the manuscript (MS) is handled according to a certain work flow. When a MS is submitted it has to be assigned to an editor who will check, for example, if the MS is appropriate for the journal or adheres to journal "Instructions for Authors" (or equivalent). The editor will then either start to assign reviewers to your MS or ...


5

Since nobody wrote it in an answer, I'll do it: the answer to your question depends on the journal, but in each field most journal would have about the same policy. In some fields (e.g. mathematics, high energy physics), the answer is 'no': posting a preprint in Academia.edu, the arXiv, or on your web page does not prevent you to have your work published by ...


3

It's possible that the editor it was assigned to has left the journal. Call them on the phone and then call another editor of that journal. It's definitely odd for it to have fallen through the cracks like that.


8

Based on our work with them, it seems to be a high quality publication. We published a JoVE article last year and several of the protocols we use in the lab are adapted from other JoVE articles. So it seems effective in its mission. The video format really works for certain protocols, and it may make it easier for people to reproduce your work (thereby ...


8

The biggest criticism I have heard so far among colleagues is the price tag: Standard access: $2,400 Open access: $4,200 But people who are willing to publish in things like Frontiers are used to this order of magnitude. At least with JoVe you understand a part of the price, as a filming team apparently visits your lab and helps with the ...


7

There have been many studies on this. Here is a recent meta-analysis of 48(!) of them: Bornmann, Lutz, Rüdiger Mutz, and Hans-Dieter Daniel. "A reliability-generalization study of journal peer reviews: a multilevel meta-analysis of inter-rater reliability and its determinants." PLOS ONE 5.12 (2010): e14331. Here's the abstract: Background This ...


-1

IASTED and IEEE Conferences have been accepted many SCIgen papers This is well known. Additionally IEEE has removed recently 1100 Conference Proceedings from IEEE Xplore because they were fake and bogus. http://www.nature.com/news/publishers-withdraw-more-than-120-gibberish-papers-1.14763


0

No. It does not. Publishing is acceptance by a publisher.


-4

I wouldn't publish my papers on a website that everyone can see before it is actually published in a journal or a conference. Someone else may claim ownership and there is nothing you can do about it In any case, assuming you did publish it on either website, you can still publish it in any journal or conference as long as you honor any copyright rules or ...


1

When you submit an application, you will usually be told what to include. Follow those rules first. If there is room to submit other materials then, providing your manuscript seems like a good idea. The usefulness of providing the manuscript will of course vary depending on the role of the position you seek. Posting the manuscript somewhere can be useful for ...



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