New answers tagged

0

No, do not "excerpt" an excellent sentence. Apparently your point is that that particular verbalization of an idea was sufficiently exceptional that you could see no better expression. And, yes, this is a reasonable conclusion, since it is entirely possible that things are very-highly-optimized. But all the worse, you ought not neglect to credit someone who ...


0

Most journals do not allow you to include references in the abstract, but you should not steal the sentence without attribution. Some options: Remove the sentence from the abstract and include it in the Introduction, with appropriate attribution and referencing. Put the quote in both the abstract and the Introduction. In the abstract, try the following ...


0

Yes, for most journals following a traditional publication model, it is extremely unlikely that you will be able to change the paper (even formatting matters) without issuing a corrigendum. What is published is published and you cannot change that. I think there are two main options you could pursue: Just ignore the formatting errors. It might be slightly ...


4

It's unlikely but not impossible. To use an example, I once had a colleague reviewing a paper where a high school student produced some results from a commonly used mathematical model in epidemiology. While not duplicative, they weren't exactly novel. Yes, no one had published for this model and this disease in this population, but these results were very ...


4

In principle, no. In actuality? It likely does, under a couple of different mechanisms: An editor might be slightly more likely to give your paper the "benefit of the doubt" if its a borderline case between Revise/Reject, etc. This may also be true if your co-authors are "known" names, regardless of their editorial position. An AE at a journal likely has ...


2

All things considered, a paper coauthored by an editor should not improve the chances of getting accepted. It is unlikely that the reviewers will be aware that one of the coauthors is an associate editor, so their reviews will be probably not be influenced by that. This is even more obvious in case the reviews are double-blind. It is possible (although ...


3

The concern here is that someone reading your CV may think that you have never had the lead role in a research project that led to publication. This is something that should be addressed in your recommendation letters. Your recommenders can say "Dr. X spearheaded project Y and made the most significant contributions; of course she is listed as last ...


0

If you are the corresponding author of an article in which the author list are ordered alphabetically, it would be advisable to do the following: Assume the name Zeta In the paper: Alphonse, Betty, Charlie, ... Zeta* Add in footnote/address field (depending on the paper format), *Corresponding author In the CV, include two subdivision in the ...


3

I would suggest adding a remark like the following to your list of publications in your CV. I publish in multiple fields, with different standards for ordering authors, some ordering by contribution and others ordering alphabetically. In the list below, first authors are indicated in bold when authors are ordered by contribution; the symbol = indicates ...


3

If this is for a job search/promotion: one way around it is to find yourself a champion to explain the situation for you, and leave it out of the CV. Your champion could be a (senior) collaborator who is writing a recommendation letter for you, or in the case of a tenure promotion, your department chair. You can ask them to include a line when describing ...


3

I don't think it will affect the perceived quality of your work if the reputation of the journal declines. However unlikely to occur, it also wouldn't matter, Impact Factors are usually calculated based on the last 3-5 years and can be tracked over time. IF is a crude measure of quality and not many researchers judge an article or journal's quality solely on ...


0

In my university proofreading would be somewhat. Editing would normally not be acceptable. The reason is that the thesis assesses many aspects of your abilities. That includes not only your ideas (intellectual skills), but also your ability to express your ideas clearly, and even your ability to express yourself in (in this case) English (transferrable ...


0

I recommend that you should talk with the supervisor about side projects. Perhaps revealing the nature of a project at once is not a good idea if the relation with the supervisor is not so close. You can start for example telling your supervisor that you are/will be collaborating with a friend on a project and see the reaction and the comments, and after a ...


0

One thing to consider is to flag it up to the editor/publisher. Most review systems have a way to provide comments to the editor only (not the original author). This is a case where you can flag up and discuss these aspects of the paper. Of course if the paper actually does not contribute anything beyond the original paper (in the same words or new ones) you ...


0

If the journal you mean is Cell/Nature/Science, then... well, god does exist in the world, may I have your signature please? Otherwise, it is not very important. For most people it is more like "publish the paper to the best journal that accepts it" rather than "I decide where I publish my paper".


1

Sometimes researchers have some sort of personal connections at the journal editorial offices. For most of the time such connections are good as they facilitate publication. To me its most likely the reason your supervisor insisted so. Of course, it saves the time of acquainting yourself to the publication requirements of other journals and, if you are ...


37

For the PhD itself it probably doesn't matter a lot, but if you are looking for a further research career, I'd advise diversifying a bit. It has the following advantages: Other people may have another "favorite" journal, and if you have published in multiple journals, you increase the chances of people thinking "wow, she published in xyz!". You will get a ...


5

Welcome to academia@stackexchange, @QuantumGirl. It might differ (slightly) between fields, but in general, I'd say it is not good. Journals have different readerships, and you want to reach different audiences. Next to that, you want to avoid the impression that you are a one-trick-pony with research that is so narrow that it is only publishable in one ...


4

You should definitely not supply them as a link to your personal page. One reason is that it looks suspicious, since you could try to identify anonymous reviewers based on server logs. Another is that if these equations are important enough to supply to the reviewers, then they need to be made permanently available to all readers. If you feel they are too ...


4

I know one relatively simple way. Zotero + a Google Scholar Zotero plugin for you browser (typically, Firefox or Chrome). Bibliographic manager. The program helps you to download bibliographic meta-data together with the PDFs (if they are open). So, you may "save" all the needed papers to "My library" in GS (if you have several collections, you may assign a ...


6

No, your talk was not in a session that would even pass the definition of plenary session. More importantly, it sounds as if the conference organizers also did not name you as a plenary speaker. Definition of plenary session: In a conferences running multiple simultaneous sessions, a plenary session will be a special session when only one session will be ...


3

This might depend on field, but it is not uncommon for two papers to appear on the same thing at pretty much the same time, and both might reasonably be published. In my experience, if a preprint appears on something someone else is writing, they will post theirs as soon as possible, to make it (reasonably) clear that their work is independent (preprints are ...


0

The legal issue regarding copyright is what concerns me. You need to investigate that. I don't think self-plagiarism is possible. Could there be partial-plagiarism if your past work involved a partner?


0

I think you should definitely contact the PC chair. It is important that each paper is evaluated on its own metric. As a matter of fact, they should be considered independent entities. Apart from above reasoning, most top tier conferences would have some sort of blinding process. Seems like in this case it was single. It might be coincidental that both ...


1

I don't think it is ethical to ask individuals to pay to publish papers. If anything they should be paid for their contribution to the journal. If anyone should pay it should be the reader...subscription fees etc


3

I think you should mail the chair. It may be to no avail, but the chair will at least be informed of the practice. Like you, I believe each paper should be judged on its own merits. Don't reject Paper B because you didn't like something in Paper A. That's truly ridiculous. But it could be a new rater who's unfamiliar with the process.


2

There is only one first author. But the 'prestige' associated with the first author, in certain fields, could be extended to a second author. An example: The two authors contributed equally to this work (source: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1404.7748.pdf) When cited, this work would be "Najman and Cousty" ("Najman"/"Najman et al" in some contexts, if more ...


2

This answer is under context that the OP's preprint was submitted primarily by him as a game piece in a competition with another group.. We uploaded the manuscript because we were scared of being scooped. We thought that by uploading the manuscript, it would make it impossible for another group to publish the same results. This answer uses the ...


0

If these packages do not interfere with the paper layout than it is completely OK. However you should follow the instructions for authors style guidelines. For instance, if the template uses a specific package for generating tables, then you shouldn't change it. Regarding the bibliography I think that it is allowed to use bibtex and derivatives as long as ...


3

As someone who moonlights as a type-setter for a mathematical journal let me tell you something about bibliography. Bibliography styles are different from one journal to another. There is nothing more terrible than having to reformat 60 entries by hand, and there aren't many things worse than having to reconstruct the .bib file in order to use the journal ...


1

Using a service that edits documents to correct grammar and spelling issues, and minor awkward phrasings, is acceptable and need not be acknowledged. Using a translation service, to translate a document from your native language into English, is acceptable, though the translator needs to be prominantly acknowledged. If you can write in English, though, it ...


3

As an author, I have had to wait anywhere from three days to seven months to get referee reports back from APS journals. The time lapse is highly variable, although two months is a typical time. I wouldn't even start to worry until it has been at least three or four months. The APS editors are also generally pretty good about letting authors know if there ...


2

The average length time in review differs between journals but also depends quite a bit on the reviewers themselves. I once had one held up 4 months due to one reviewer, who was ultimately replaced, which then took another 2 months, and that was just the first round. It is totally acceptable to contact the action editor to ask for a status update, and I ...


3

Personally, I've reviewed for a number of journals that have let the authors know my name, or publish the name of the peer reviewers alongside the manuscript and it hasn't much changed my style. Perhaps it's because I assume you could figure my name out if you tried, or because I'm trying the "Do onto others..." approach to peer review, but there's really ...


6

I usually publish in IOP journals and I can confirm O. R. Mapper's remarks. As an example, these are the packages included in a recent paper of mine: \documentclass[10pt,a4paper]{iopart} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{iopams} \usepackage{amsopn} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{cite} \usepackage{siunitx} \usepackage{tikz} ...


10

Unless explicitly forbidden, adding packages is usually ok and fully expected - e.g. in order to add support for listings, tables, symbols, encodings, operational utilities (extended macro/logic support), or specific features thereof. This should, however, never mean a general change in the appearance of the paper. Therefore, packages that globally alter ...


2

I would say, let the review of your paper go forward. If it is rejected because of the other paper, well that's what happens sometimes. But maybe it will be accepted anyway. The decision is up to the journal editor. I don't know what this paper is about, but in some fields, replication of results is sometimes useful. If your paper is published, maybe ...


8

Do you know that they were aware of the preprint? Scoops are bound to be common if many groups are working on the same problem or starting to flesh out a new area with lots of low-hanging fruit. If they were aware of your preprint, and you can prove it, they should have cited your preprint at the very least, and you might get them to publish an errata with ...


6

I have a similar history of reviewing papers at around eight years, though in the fields of engineering and robotics. Between the official reviews for journals or conferences (which are almost all single blind and in rare cases double blind) and informal reviews for colleagues, I would say I differ only in level of tactfulness. The stakes in the official ...


3

If it's published in the conference proceedings, it's published. You can list it as a conference publication in your CV. You can't publish it again in conference proceedings. Regarding publishing it (or an extended version) in a journal, see Under what circumstances can one republish a conference paper/presentation? especially this answer.


3

With regard to your thesis, you should be as explicit and verbose as possible. It's your thesis, and you will likely never have another chance to explain this issue as clearly as you will now. Avoid being accusatory, but show all the various interpretations of the model in the literature that are relevant and explain your insights thoroughly. Use as many ...


2

Discrete Analysis has been launched a few months ago. It's an arXiv overlay journal, so you have access to the raw text by following the link to the arXiv and clicking on "Other formats".


2

The advise you're getting from other answerers is fine -- though I have a few points to offer. In this analysis, I'm entirely leaving the circumstances of your separation from the school out of the scenario, as there are quite a few sides to stories like this, and chances are your department and faculty don't have the same view of the situation as you do. ...


3

The results section is for your results. The discussion section is for discussing them - and this includes the significance in light of other results. Keep the former purely for statements, the facts of the matter. The latter is where you move into interpretation (and expanding on very brief comments which are necessary for reading results reported).


42

I suggest you respond to the student and your former advisor roughly as follows: You do not consent to their proposal to publish the paper, as prepared, with you listed as 4th author. You believe that the substance of your contribution entitles you to first authorship, either on this paper, or on another paper to be published with citation priority. You ...


15

A paper must not be published without the (explicit or implicit) consent of all coauthors. This holds true for preprint servers as the arXiv just as for journals, etc. Given the state of your relationship, there is no basis for assuming implicit consent of your former supervisor. Thus, submitting the paper to the arXiv with your former supervisor as ...


2

You can ask the editor. It's called a pre-submission inquiry.


5

However, my supervisor is not very familiar with the field I'm in This may not necessarily be a bad thing. Having your article read by someone who's an expert in this specific field can give you another valuable point of view. One way I can think of is contacting the authors of papers I cited, and ask their feedback. But most of them are established ...


0

many journals provide an acceptance rate somewhere on their website. this statistic can provide insight into how many people who submit actually make it into the journal. this one way to know how you may fair in addition to other strategies.


7

As one of the other answers says, typesetting is completely irrelevant--the question is whether or not you are authorized to upload the content. The RoMEO website has documentation on the precise legal authorizations of every major journal publisher, and of an extensive list of journals. You can consult it to quickly confirm what exactly the journals you've ...



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