New answers tagged

4

Probably you cannot change it , usually journals inform authors to double check names and affiliation when they send galley proof because after publication it's difficult to change them , but the best approach is contacting editor in chief for explaining the mistake , maybe they fix it


11

First of all, calm down. This is not as big of a mistake as you think it is. Many if not most published work contains insignificant mistakes such as minor typos. If it would make you feel better, I once had a typo in my own name (I blame autocorrection). Contact the editor. They are probably going to publish a correction or erratum. If it is already ...


3

Why don't you write the corresponding author and ask them what the sample size was. You can always cite the sample size, if you decide to use the study, as a personal communication.


1

This addresses your journal of interest, specifically. More generally, academic.research.microsoft.com can be used to find such information for other journals, as well as conferences. Disclaimer: As user ff524 has pointed out in the comments of this answer, Microsoft Academic Search has stopped indexing/tracking "even a fraction of papers published since ...


1

There are no rules. These terms date from when the printed versions of journals were paramount. Individual issues of the journal, which might come out monthly or quarterly would be bound together into hardback volumes once or twice a year for long term storage at libraries. The publisher might do this, or they might print the volume number on each issue so ...


0

Another idea would be to submit your manuscript to a pre-print repository and see if you get some comments on it. Of course, you should take into account the fact that not all journals publish works that have already been posted in a repository. Additionally, you could also send a pre-submission inquiry to some journal editors with a brief summary of your ...


0

Since the time-frames for review in other journals under the same publisher vary anywhere between 3-4 months to a year, I think you can consider the time-frame normal in your case. However, I think it should be fine to write a polite email to the journal editor asking him/her to update you about the current status of your paper.


2

My guess is rather different from what has been suggested/observed in la femme cosmique's answer; it comes with the caveat that I have not worked in France, although I did live in Quebec for a couple of years. On the other hand, I have passing familiarity as a reader with French mathematical journals. Based on what I see published in journals such as Ann ...


7

I would not use Google Translate for this. I recently moved to France and I needed to do this a few times, and when I did a Google Translate (even a 'nice' one*) it still sounded bad to the native French people around. In that particular experience, a French person editing my 3 page document took about 1.5 hours. GT leaves much to be desired. Even when ...


0

Depending upon your field, it may be acceptable to write a short note to the journal requesting an update on the status of the article. So long as you are respectful in asking, there will not be any harm in doing so.


1

If you really believe he/she is deliberately delaying submission, here are two suggestions: 1) relay your frustration at a seemingly unending process and ask to make a list of objective goals that, once accomplished, ends with publication. That way, it will be clear what needs to be done 2) ask to add a 3rd party reader. You'll benefit from another set of ...


1

You may try an online publisher for that. For example, leanpub. This way you can benefit from the material being widely available, and you still can improve the text whenever you want.


5

Yes, it will be less attractive to (most) publishers. Most publishers operate as businesses and seek to maximise profits [citation needed]. The availability of an earlier edition on the Internet will reduce the demand for the publisher's version and thus the potential revenue that could be gained from publishing your book. The extent to which your ...


2

how is this seen by the academic world? Generally speaking, as inferior to a peer-reviewed paper. But the 'academic world' is made up of a lot of different people. Assuming you have conducted a high-quality study, the extent to which a reader would consider your findings valid or robust or believable really depends on how they feel about the value added ...


1

The underlying measurement precision is a key element of the rounding of any calculated number. In your circumference example, the radius is stated as "6.2" units (and not "6.20" or "6.200"). The sensible convention is to use only one more decimal place in the calculated answer as the least precise underpinning measurement. So, the circumference should be ...


2

Now, I doubt any decent teacher would discard this result as wrong I'm generally considered a decent teacher, and, yes, I'd consider that result partly wrong and I'd remove a mark or two, because students, especially from certain fields (e.g. engineering), should learn to get the values right, also, not only the math. There are mathematical tools that ...


8

I have seen some journals that ask that you put figure captions all together on a single page separate from the figures themselves (an extremely annoying requirement both for reviewers and authors). But I doubt that is what your journal is asking you to do. More common is just that you put each table and figure on a separate page. So the caption would ...


5

Take Elsevier's definition of the preprint: This is the author's own write-up of research results and analysis that has not been peer reviewed, nor had any other value added to it by a publisher (such as formatting, copy-editing, technical enhancements, and the like). The preprint is the manuscript version that you initially submitted to the journal, ...


0

Academic journals generally publish papers describing original research results that advance (or try to advance) a particular field of study. Development of a product is not necessarily an original research result. Does your design involve a new approach or technique that has not previously been used in the field? Does it represent a new way of thinking ...


11

In my experience, those who like to evaluate by counting are happy to count citations and to count publications. Thus, in their eyes you are generally better off with more publications, regardless of citation counts. On the other hand (at least in my field of applied mathematics), when evaluation is done by actually looking at your body of work (and what ...


1

Patience is a very valuable virtue, especially in science, and especially in literature publication. A couple of months is not a long amount of time. I would suggest that you need to get more irons in the fire so you stop focusing on just this one. Perhaps 3 months is a long time in your field - it took me almost 3 years to push out my last paper from my PhD ...


4

At the author proof stage, you are expected to not make any more substantive changes. Thus, if the copyeditors introduced these unwanted references, there is zero problem in asking for them to be removed. If you realize that you messed up any put in things that you should not have or wish that you had not, however, it's a bit more iffy. You can ask to ...


3

He keeps on saying the paper is not clear and is thus not ready for submission, but there is no revision comments from him for several months. The main problem is that we cannot decide whether the opinion of your advisor is reasonable. May be the paper is poorly written, and he expects you to clear up the structure of the paper before really reading ...


0

Your problem is not uncommon, especially in post-doc programmes. The level at which an advisor would dedicate his time to a post-doc fellow would vary widely among universities and countries. From the possible viewpoint of your advisor: as a qualified PhD, you are considered to have sufficient skills to do progressive research (even on a relatively new ...


9

The first things that jump out at me from this question are these: Why do you think that your advisor is dragging his feet? Why do you think your advisor is incorrect about your paper not being clear? What is the time schedule on which you expect to publish? Now, this may in fact be the case, but in my experience, in most cases even graduating Ph.D. ...


1

This would have to be done by the journal itself. The journal would need to embed your authenticated ORCID iD into the article's metadata, and amend the online version of the article in order to include your ORCID iD. Retroactively adding an ORCID iD to a published work is no easy task. Like Andrew, one cannot recall any journals or publishers stating that ...


3

The intent of keywords is to aid in indexing so that your article can be easier to the reach of people who search for specific topic (DoS in your example). Hence, bear in mind the people whom you are trying to reach when selecting the keywords. Certain journal publishers, such as IEEE, have a complete list of keywords you ought to follow. These lists are ...


2

Disclaimer: When I first read the unedited version of the question, I assumed that, since OP recently finished his/her PhD, they more or less figured out how to write papers during their studies, and that the question was more about an authorship conflict. Should I submit without him? You seem to present two options: wait for your advisor to review, ...


10

Carl Newport tried to answer a similar question in a blog post The Single Number that Best Predicts Professor Tenure: A Case Study in Quantitative Career Planning. He is a computer scientist (and therefore values conference proceedings rather than journal articles). His main findings were that: The successful young professors published a lot. On ...


4

I know a former colleague, who publishes all his work under the name A. B. C. Ddddd Eeeee, even though he comes from a part of India where the family name comes first – so his family name is in fact Aaaaa. In his case, that works: academically, he's known as Prof. Ddddd Eeeee. But it works only because nobody outside of India and few people in India ...


0

I would say depend on the personality and interests from the adviser. I have worked with adviser that loves to push a certain idea and anything that you worked on would help lead to a published paper that enhance this certain idea, he'll jump right on it and gives me plenty of journal contacts and help me publish it. I also have some that are not very ...


3

I don't know if it is possible to add your ORCID directly to the paper in question (probably not), but it is possible to link to the paper from your ORCID profile. Go to your ORCID account (signing in if necessary) This should bring up a page with your "Biography", which consists of several collapsible tabs (Education, Employment, Funding and Works). Next ...


7

There are in all likelihood differences between fields of study. In mine, it is uncommon, but if it happend it would be a good sign: You have produced something that is worth publishing, which is rare for a Master thesis in my field. Turning that research in an article that can be published is an art, which I would not expect a master student to master. So ...


1

The address is primarily a matter of knowing where you may reside. From this perspective the former address is of less value. However, since universities use publications for their evaluation of performance adding the former address can eb a way to "thank" your old institute. This is particularly true if you did the work there. So, the suggestion would be ...


8

family names precede given names in Eastern Asian culture ... and in Hungarian, and possibly some other languages. As an Eastern Asian who just started my career in academia, I am seriously considering publishing my future papers under Li Lingfeng instead of Lingfeng Li (just an example). I am not sure this is possible: I have come across various ...


14

Is it possible to withdraw authorship almost 2 years after the paper has been published in a journal? No, as a general rule you can't. You can publish an erratum if there's a clear-cut mistake in a paper that needs to be corrected or noted, and you can retract the paper if the mistake is so significant that nothing of any value can be salvaged. ...


23

I wouldn't retract authorship, science is all about revising research based on new data or a better explanation. I'd suggest publishing a new paper, and explaining what you disagree with or have found better interpretations of from the old paper. A withdrawal of authorship (even if possible) would be interpreted as some form of manipulation of data in the ...


0

Well, there might be a middle ground between spreadsheets and relational DBs. A couple years ago I signed up as a trial user for a tech startup called Fieldbook, which aimed at making data storage and manipulation in RDBs simpler and more intuitive. Admittedly, I didn't have the time or need to play around too much so I don't know if it's good enough for ...


1

A growing number of journals and publishers now recognise that quality of written English is not automatically correlated with academic merit. In life sciences, I know several publishers who actively recommend 'language polishing' services as it allows peer reviewers to focus on scientific issues rather than correcting language. For example: The Royal ...


5

If this is common in your field, then you should imitate how you see it handled most often in other people's papers. I don't know of any standard abbreviation for "student" in this context, so I'd imagine you should write it out, but again you should imitate what other people do unless you see a good reason to do otherwise. If it's not common in your field ...


1

Based on your comment The algorithm is definitely related to my PhD topic, yes! and that the work would form part of my dissertation, yes. I think you are thinking about this incorrectly. You want your advisor (and committee members) to have buy-in in your work. You want them excited about your work, contributing to your work, etc, as soon as ...


2

Before answering, allow me to highlight some additional details OP posted in the comments below their post. First, I asked OP if listing an advisor as a co-author is the default in his/her group, to which OP replied: Yes, listing the advisor's name as the last author is the default in the group. I also asked OP if the algorithm (s)he developed is ...


3

One way would be to write down every term or phrase that spark your interest and look them up later. The best way in this day and age, in my opinion, is to open up each paper you plan to read in a new tab in your browser and sort them in order of importance. For example, the paper that you are currently reading should be in the active tab; the next tab ...


3

I had passed through similar situations, and my conclusion is that if your advisor is a good scientist, he will understand that you need to work on some projects by yourself to develop your scientific skills. The only thing that I would advise you to do is to make him aware that you plan to submit the paper to a conference whose deadline is soon, or that you ...


20

The question is: is this possible? If you have signed over the copyright of your paper to this journal, or given them an irrevocable license to distribute, then they don't have to take down the paper just because you have asked them. In fact, if they are a reputable journal and the paper has already been published, they shouldn't just take down the ...


14

If you don't know whether your advisor expects to be a co-author or not, just ask him. If you feel that the advisor shouldn't be a co-author, you can present that as the "default": I am planning to write up my work with X, to submit to conference Y. You haven't really been involved in this work so far, so I guess you won't co-author this paper with me. ...


3

The consequences for not attending a conference to present your paper will depend on the conference. The best thing to do now is contact the conference organizers and explain your situation and ask what the consequences are for not showing up. Also, ask if the conference allows for a non-author to present in your absence. If they do, maybe you can find ...


8

This is a complex situation, and to even attempt a truly thorough answer one would need to know more details than you have provided (though your reticence is understandable). I would begin by saying that in my opinion the main problem is not what you think it is. My advisor has NO knowledge of the field. This is the main problem. You're just ...


5

It is unlikely there would be any consequences for failing to present at a conference. It would be impolite and disappoint your former adviser. You should notify the conference if you decide not to attend.


7

You have not yet made what's called a public disclosure of your research, which would render it (from an institutional standpoint) un-patentable. The second you display your poster, or if there is a short paper published along side it, is the second your work becomes publicly disclosed. Also bear in mind that if you have, on some website or another, posted ...



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