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0

The second paragraph of section 3 is relevant. Academia.edu is not specifically mentioned. If your funder requests that you deposit it on Academia.edu, you can do that. It is not your own website nor that of your department or faculty. The matter reduces to the meaning of "on his/her own website". From the perspective of Academia.edu, you are a user or ...


1

You can check here what you are allowed to do; http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ Some springer journals are Romeo Green, and allow you to upload the author post review final draft to an open Access repository 12 months after publication. With Open Access publications you can do that straight away


1

An extended journal version might well combine multiple input papers, though this is somewhat unusual. In general if somebody was an author on one of the papers that is a source, then they should be an author on the composite. The only exception that I can think of is if the resulting composite paper drops sections from some of the inputs, and certain ...


3

If the work is extending the original, then all of the original authors should be retained. New authors can certainly be added, however, if they have contributed to the extension.


0

I would find it kind of fishy if the authors change between conference paper and journal paper. It would be no problem if they differ substantially, but if this is not the case then one might try to contact the missing authors.


13

I do not know of any, and I can't imagine any that would. Typically, the journal would not have the copyright assignment until after they accepted, though I hear that some venues ask for this upfront. Additionally, this isn't really how academic publication is supposed to work. A rejection isn't the end of the road for a work of scientific authorship. Many ...


2

At Vixra.org you will find papers often rejected from Arxiv.org, and possibly also from the 'printed' press.


3

Of course, as Enthusiastic Student says, you should check with your co-authors before sharing your unpublished work with anyone. Once that is done, you can certainly ask. Statisticians are very often asked to consult on the use of statistics in papers from other areas. So it's possible that your institution has some system in place for such requests. You ...


1

I agree with User6726, but want to add a few things. For a journal publication (to make the answer more general) you could check the journals style guide or how Italic is used within articles published in the journal. As your question is specifically about a thesis, find out which style your thesis should be in (APA, Chicago etc). You will be needing this ...


4

There can be specific exceptions for journals, which may have conventions preserved unchanged from the past, but the general principle is to be typographically simple while conveying the necessary information. Quotation marks are required to unambiguously indicate that a certain sequence of test is a literal quotation; the quote itself should then not modify ...


3

Is there a reason why you can't provide EPS files? Do you have original (for example .fig if you created the file in Matlab) files? It can be irritating to constantly re-make your figures, but EPS are recommended by almost everyone because they store vector data, not pixels, when generated from applications/filetypes that support vector graphics. This means ...


0

In my experience PNG and Multilayered TIFF formats are constructed using layers which in rare cases in some software to cause some layers not be be displayed or appear even when the layer(s) have been switched to invisible. It is recommended to use flat formats (non-layered) such as JPEG or if sizing is necessary then use Vector or resize friendly format ...


43

Running a journal with Wiley as a publisher, Wiley's instructions state JPEG, TIFF and EPS are acceptable formats. Since many authors supply figures in PDF and PNG I started to pass these on to the type-setter and found that no issues erupted. It is therefore clear that publishers may lag behind with their recommendations while type-setters are quicker to ...


16

I don't think there is anything wrong with PNG that makes it unsuitable, but it may be the case that the publisher's processing software does not support PNG files (or they never bothered to update their author's instructions). To avoid extra work it is usually best to stick to the publisher's instructions and submit using formats they recommend. I would ...


2

The journal mentioned in the comments below the original question is published by Springer, which oftentimes guarantees some kind of quality. At the same time, the editor in chief and all members of the editorial board are from Ukraine -- a country small enough to make it questionable that they can have a sufficient number of internationally relevant ...


5

In a case such as this, you need to use a careful mixture of tenses, because sometimes you are speaking about an event which is in the past, and sometimes you are speaking about an observation about that event, which still holds in the present. Thus, in your example: We analyze the epidemic spreading dataset in 2008. Let I(t) represent the number of ...


6

Most, if not all regular journals allow you retract submissions at any time before publication, in which case you do not need to wait for the journal to reject your paper and a simple email that you retract your paper should suffice (even if they do not reply to it – make sure that you have proof that you sent that mail though). The details of this will be ...


1

That journal really doesn't sound reliable. The main principle when submitting to journal is to confirm that the article is not under review by somebody else, so I am afraid that if you don't receive a final confirmation that they rejected the paper, it is better not to send it elsewhere.


1

I've noticed many papers deal with this problem by doing: time-travel has long been known to be possible [17, 18, 4]. Where 17 is an older research paper, 18 is a recent paper with more comprehensive results, and 4 is the review which may or may not have pointed the authors to 17 and 18 in the first place. I suppose this way, you both cite the ...


1

Perhaps your choice of the word "steal" to describe the inclusions of block citations reveals your feelings on the matter. If you are copying text verbatim, and I assume it is by saying "block of citations," then you should provide a citation to the source. That is my take. However, by altering your conundrum slightly, does it lead you to a difficult ...


26

You must cite your source every time you use someone else's intellectual contributions. A review article contributes curation of sources (among other things) as its intellectual content. If you use that intellectual content, you must cite the review paper (in addition to the individual sources). Otherwise you are misleading the reader into believing that ...


4

I do not see why that would be plagiarism at all. Taking references from other papers, reading them, and citing them in your own paper is a regular process. If you copy & paste the sentences that refer to those citations along with the references, then it would be considered plagiarism, but no, not in your case.


6

The reviews are already 3 months overdue past the deadline. You have every right to ask for a progress update, if only to remind the editor in charge of your paper that you're still waiting. I would write to that editor again, and if you don't get anything back write to him again with a CC: to the Editor-in-Chief.


5

I work in this field. Yes, you should contact the Editor to ask them what their policy is on submissions that are based on a prior conference publication -- but ask very carefully. See the last two paragraphs of this answer before writing to them. In particular, I suggest contacting the Editor-in-Chief. It's fair game to write and ask them what their ...


1

I think the most important factor is who you (and the editor/reviewers) think should read the paper. Nature has a very broad readership from different fields - if your results are relevant for this broad audience, send there. PLoS ONE is also multidisciplinary, but has a different audience then Nature. If your results are relevant to a more specific field, ...


3

My opinion on this is as follows. If your research advances the state of the art of field X, either by adding new knowledge specifically to X or improving existing methods/knowledge in X, you should submit to an X-specific journal. If your paper improves knowledge in field Y using methods from field X, I would either publish in a journal specific to Y, or in ...


1

You can make a copy of your paper, seal it in a brown envelope and go to the post office, have the envelope hand stamped and mailed back to you. Do NOT open your the envelope but keep it in a safe place. Then if you ever need it, you can bring the sealed envelope that has been postmarked with the earlier date which is your proof the original material was ...


2

I have had this experience too. The journal that rejected my work also had other papers which were extended versions of conference papers so it was completely inconsistent. I recommend simply ignoring this journal from now on unless it is really the leading one in your field. You could first write a polite letter to the editor pointing out the unfairness in ...


-3

No, do not argue with the editor that rejected the paper. Yes, send it to another journal. (Of course reference the "poster paper" and explain the differences. This benefits no only the journal you submit to, but also potential readers who have already seen the previous poster paper.)


4

I am not sure that I understood clearly your question, but as far as I understand, you have the exact same paragraphs in some part of the two papers (i.e., copy and paste ?). If this is the case, maybe you should take the rule "X% of old content allowed" as a semantic rule, not syntactic. So this means 100-X % new results, but almost 100% rewriting of the ...


15

So you wrote in the cover letter that the work is an extended version of a conference paper that accompanied a poster presentation. Apparently, this information got missing somewhere. Also this information should actually be in the paper, as Maarten van Wesel already wrote, as the later reader should be also be made aware of this. So, judging from your ...


5

You should have clearly indicated in your paper (for instance as a note to the title) and in you letter to the editor the publication of the conference paper, how it is titled, and that it is available online. If you haven't indicated this, get on your knees and explain this to the editor. Promising you will correct this on a new to submit manuscript


1

IEEE doesn't care: use whatever best communicates to your readers, and make sure you explain it if you aren't using a blatantly obvious notation.


12

Many (most?) academic papers include a brief acknowledgment section somewhere (the location is not standard). In this section it is frequent to acknowledge help by the referees. One can equally well acknowledge comments by referees of previous versions of the paper. For the sake of clarity it seems best to mention that one is thanking the referee of the ...


6

The problem is less ResearchGate and more your field. As far as I know, ResearchGate, unlike Academia.edu, does not claim copyright or commercial license for your uploads; and they refer to their upload service as more self-archiving than anything else. That said, different fields and different publishers have different attitudes toward what it means to be ...


1

My experience is that usage varies. In my field, it is common to use 'referee' for the person who anonymously comments on a paper submitted to a journal, and 'reviewer' for the person who writes about a paper already published to appear publicly in a database. However, people I know in similar areas use 'reviewer' for the first meaning. To confuse things ...


2

Typically they are synonymous (see this wiki entry). Some journals use one term or another, and some use both. Some fields may tend to use one more than another, but I don't know. However, my impression is that the term "referee" means someone who makes a thorough evaluation of a paper (one should check correctness and make detailed suggestions if ...


9

So far as I have ever been able to tell, "referee" and "reviewer" mean exactly the same thing.


6

I think they are synonyms. I guess there might be a very slight emphasis that a referee makes a decision, where a reviewer produces a report. But both do both, in the case of journals.


5

The other answers basically state that yes, there are bogus conferences (and journals) as well as legit conferences but with very low quality standards. One thing they don't really address, and that I think motivates the OP's question is: why would there be such conferences? The answer is quite simple. They're a great business opportunity (in a very ...


15

I think there are two different but related kinds of conferences. First are the conferences which are essentially bogus and shady. They do exist and run but the associations and quality they claim is fake. These are borderline fraud conferences but hard to prove so because they will come up with some bare minimum genuine-ness criteria if called out. People ...


4

I smell a big fat scam: The number of scientists from reputable universities that are supposedly attending this is just a little bit suspicious. The website is horrible. The conference does not exist on IEEE's website when I search for a list of conferences in Spain. I'm no engineer, but the paper titles seem nonsensical. If you're ever unsure, you ...


1

The recent Analysis and geometry in metric spaces, while maybe not yet well-established, is as far as I can tell (after exchange with the editorial board at some occasions) trustworthy as any math journal; this is witnessed by the impressive editorial board.


31

The majority of papers in pure math have no concluding section. In fact, such papers most commonly end with the last line of the proof of the last main result (or the last lemma needed for the last main result) of the paper. I think that I have never seen a pure math paper that has a concluding section in the sense of other academic papers, i.e., whose ...


7

Plenty of papers in math don't have a conclusion, or even a separate "open problems" section at the end - in fact, I think this is the norm. Some specific examples: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1503.05803v1.pdf, http://arxiv.org/pdf/1503.05884v1.pdf, and http://arxiv.org/pdf/1503.05880v1.pdf - currently the first papers listed on the arxiv in logic, number theory, ...


0

In the publish or perish culture that is prevalent in academia, it is always a good thing to have more publications on your CV. While many journals place an undue emphasis on novelty, it is not always mandatory to have new results in a publication. The purpose of a publication is to contribute to existing knowledge in the field. There are many ways in which ...


6

I'll try to link to pages which describe the open-access policy of the respective journals. Both Proceedings of the AMS and Transactions of the AMS allow the author to pay a fee to make their article freely available electronically from the journal. If the author chooses not to pay the fee then the article is not freely available from the journal (but the ...


2

By publishing papers in different journals, you definitely gain a wider readership. Having publications in a wide array of journals gives the impression that your work is acceptable to more readers across journals, and perhaps even across disciplines. Publishing repeatedly in the same journal might give the impression that your work is valued only by a ...


3

The UK as a whole is moving towards using open access, so most of the UK maths journals, and a proportion of others, now offer open access in some form (although that can mean allowing you to put the final draft on a repository, called 'green open access'). The LMS has created the Transactions, which is fully open access ('gold').


4

Journal of Mathematical Physics, which publishes articles by mathematicians, is a serious journal published by AIP that follows the AIP fee-based Open Access policy : http://publishing.aip.org/librarians/open-access-policy



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