New answers tagged

3

[Expanding @Thomas's comment into an answer, so the question may be resolved] The best way to figure out how a person would like their name listed is to simply ask them directly, as opposed to attempting to infer it from their biographical information. Thus, when you are putting together the program, name tags, etc. let the form have a blank saying ...


0

Ultimately I agree with Carol. If you trust your supervisor, you should make sure you and them are on the same page. Relay your concerns to your supervisor, and they can use whatever has convinced them to help make your talk engaging to the audience. In other words, you might be wrong that the results are uninteresting, and if you're not wrong, your ...


2

You shouldn't cancel the talk if you've proved a smart idea wrong, because negative results are as important as positive results. You also shouldn't cancel it if you can give a "work in progress" talk if you still haven't proved it right or wrong. But you shouldn't give a talk that just panders to your conception of what your supervisor wants. It's ...


1

This is not a bad position to be in! and yes you should give the talk. Couple of things here: To Be or Not to Be: Yes, it is important to find "X" holds in your research, however finding the "X" is actually not holding is not a bad thing; all you need is to have an explanation for it. Ambiguity Is the Problem: It raises a red flag when the researcher ...


3

Do a practice talk with your advisor before going to the conference. Do it early. It will be a good time to discuss how the talk should be organized in order to highlight the context of your measurement in the whole project and its relative importance. It is common for a student working on a small piece of problem (and not necessarily looking at its ...


3

[1] A little tip I picked up from boardroom presentations when I was in industry... Imagine you are a keynote speaker at a conference. Begin your presentation with the words "I will respond to any questions at the end of the presentation". If anybody, including X, attempts to ask a question, repeat the words "I will respond to questions at the end of the ...


-5

I would say don't cancel the talk. Mathematics, Science is built on the foundation of Theories many of which remain unproven today. The important thing is you are making a Case for the existence of X, you probably have not got there yet but what is to say that speaking about it at the conference wouldn't spark a conversation that invariably helps you see the ...


9

It seems it is a junk conference, which will not bring you anything, but waits for your money! Don't go, it is a waste of time, you will get nothing good from it, since no one really involved at a high level in your field will come. It is not unusual for those kind of conferences to invite "anyone" as an invited speaker.


5

On the other hand, if I leave it until the talk, it means that I have to bring it up in front of the rest of the research group, and he has no time to prepare a response. Not necessarily. You have the option of bringing it up with your collaborator privately, after the talk. In general, a talk is not the ideal time to figure out whether the work ...


0

There are several points to consider: Is it safe to pass it around? If the answer is "no", then it's "no". Can you pass it to all? It would be annoying to let only the front row get it in their hands, so consider this. Do you mind people getting distracted? In general, most audience does not pay attention to the speaker anyway at a seminar, so from my ...


15

This is a terrific idea, and moreover you should also strongly consider passing the device around so that people can inspect it and hold it in their hands. The idea that the opportunity to have either visual or tactile contact with a scientific instrument or device "doesn't add any content" is simply false. At the very least, including a prop of this sort in ...


6

Personally, I've always been unable to clearly understand the arrangement of a complex device from pictures or drawings, and I much appreciate the possibility of observing directly a device after its description. In addition, since you've been invited to talk specifically about this device, the audience should appreciate your idea of bringing it along. ...


25

The goal of your seminar is to educate and inform your audience about your work. If showing the audience a prototype of your work will help them to better visualize and conceptualize what you are doing, then why wouldn't you want to take advantage of that during your talk? So long as you properly integrate into your talkā€”make it an essential part of it, ...



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