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1

Start it with a compelling question that add some context to your talk. A recent talk at a conference I attended started like this: What is the largest sumfree subset of the numbers 1 to n? This is a well-known problem first posed by Erdos, and if someone can say that their research leads to a nice way to solve it, a lot of people will be interested ...


2

This may get lost among the other good answers, but it's worth looking at the conference website for last year's edition of the conference (or the last several) in order to find out about the format. If it's entirely organized around parallel sessions of paper presentations, then you're likely to be giving a talk. If it's an even mix of posters and talks, ...


0

I would suggest that, as the other answers say, you should talk to your advisor about this. First off, they will be happy to explain the process to you. In fact, I'd go so far as to take a guess that your advisor will have potentially published in this conference before (you could check their past publications to see if this is the case). Was your advisor ...


1

First of all don't worry about whether the question is silly or not. There are no silly questions, there are only silly questions ;) Moreover, it's pretty normal for early PhD students to be unacquainted with the 'politics' of academia (how publishing works, differences between venues, etc..). So it is pretty normal to ask your supervisor about these stuff, ...


4

Yes, "accepted" means that your talk is going to be included in the program (when it's published) and you are expected to present it at the conference. Congratulations! Don't get your hopes up though, your time slot could be as short as 15 minutes and in parallel with other talks, and the conference organizers will not contribute any money towards your ...


11

The practices vary significantly by field, but unless it is a very unusual case, having your abstract accepted means that you will be presented in some form or another. It is not certain, however, whether you will be making an oral presentation. In some meetings, having your abstract accepted means that you are definitely going to be getting up on stage ...


1

In addition to the excellent answers, a couple more tips: pay attention during the talk for slides that the speaker may skip, details which are only glossed over. In case the audience is particularly shy/uninspired, you can always ask the speaker to talk a bit more about those parts. He/She obviously has something to say about them even if they were less ...


3

As a host and chair of the session you have many conflicting duties: keeping the speaker happy, keeping him from running overtime, preventing awkwardness if there are not enough questions, preventing awkwardness if a person in the audience asked improper questions (too low-level, too specific, dismissive of speaker), etc. How you do these things depends on ...


24

First of all, stop worrying - I am sure that, no matter how you decide to approach this, the quality of the talk will be much more memorable to the participants than how you ran the Q&A part from an administrative point of view. Further: I thank people for coming and introduce the speaker. I sit down and the speaker... speaks. At the end of his ...


8

You should take a seat in the audience, near the front, after you've introduced the speaker. When the speaker calls for questions, ask the first one, on which you and the speaker have agreed in advance. That should break the ice and start questions from the audience. If it doesn't, have about two follow-up questions ready. When the time limit is ...


3

I think there is, in principle, nothing wrong for you to put these talks on your CV provided (i) they will really happen, and (ii) it is clear that they are in the future -- so put a (future) date next to them. As a graduate student applying for jobs, you are in the same situation as all of the other graduate students: your CV is still pretty short. It is ...



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