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-1

Call the Barenaked Ladies and ask them to compose a song similar to the Big Bang Theory Title. Then take a Guitar and sing. In this case you manage to bring a lot of content inside a very limited time slot. On the other side this kind of presentation will burn your name into the brains of the scientific audience. Scientists are also often very thankful for ...


1

Both keynote and invited talks are commonly not (or less rigorously) peer reviewed but often paid-for talks. It indicates that some of the organizers asked (invited) one the authors to contribute/present. Usually, these are high profile domain experts asked to do a longer, motivating, overview talk; which usually does not present a new technical result. It ...


4

I have to disagree with Bill Barth's answer. You are giving a job talk. A job talk is about your research accomplishments and vision, and how you fit the qualifications of the position. You are not giving a talk on behalf of your old university, but on your own behalf, as an individual researcher. You are seeking individual employment; you are not ...


3

Having an invited talk and not having been invited is unusual, indeed. Maybe your professor was invited and passed the ball to you; the best thing to do is asking him/her. "Oral" also is unusual for me (but maybe not in other fields). As noted in the other answer, typically the hierarchy is, from most to least prestigious: keynote/plenary: people who were ...


11

A keynote speech or presentation is a high-profile talk intended to be of interest to everyone at the conference, and is one of the selling points of the conference. Invited speakers are those who have been invited to give a talk by the organisers of the conference. My assumption is that 'oral' is just every other talk, i.e. speakers who applied to the ...


11

Typically, in the departments and universities I'm familiar with, as a student you're also an employee of your current institution, benefiting from their space at the very least and participating in the local research culture. As such, it's appropriate to keep the branding on your job talk slides since it's not just some obligation to the university to ...


1

I think it also depends on the culture of the speaker. I spent some time in the US and France, and I keep hearing "[great|good|excellent|etc.] questions" in the former while it was quite rare in the latter.


7

Let me answer question 2 first, since it is easier. You can highly encourage your examiners/audience members to interrupt you at anytime with questions. (This prevents the problem from happening.) Additionally prepare some written notes and when giving your presentation use clear and consistent numberings/namings of equations and theorems. (This makes it ...


0

Well to give a better understanding visualization is needed. During defense you main aim is to make people understand what you were doing and how good it is. If you feel you can make them understand without the slides go for it.


12

There is another option, that gives the best of both worlds: use transparencies on an overhead projector! Your department will probably have one buried in the dungeons somewhere. Some projectors have a continuous roll of film that you scroll up and down over the surface you write on, with others you'll need to use individual A4 transparency sheets. If you ...


30

I have seen plenty of thesis defenses that use blackboards (the boards in our department are black- rather than white-, but I don't see that it makes a difference) and also plenty that have used slides. You should ask around -- or remember from previous thesis defenses you have attended; these are almost always open to all interested parties -- to see ...


3

The answer to your first question is hidden in your second question. Usually the questions are asked after the presentation and hence you might be asked to go to previous slide when the opponent might have a question or doubt. Also if people will ask you questions in between the presentation which is considered as rude behaviour on their part, might destroy ...


5

Money is a finite resource. Your adviser may have very good reasons to attend (his "excuse" certainly doesn't sound "flimsy" to me but very reasonable from the perspective of a PI) and there may simply not be enough money to pay for both of your trips. There may in fact be no money at all to pay for your travel and he may be paying for his travel from some ...


8

My question: do you think I should challenge these folks or quietly accept their excuses for wanting to go Well, you've already asked about going, and the answer was "no." Nothing wrong with asking again, though. However, I want to point out that the way your question reads, it sounds like your previous conversation was more about your PIs attending, ...


1

There may be good reasons why your advisors aren't encouraging you to go to these meetings. For example, they may feel the costs of sending you are out of proportion to the benefits you would get from the experience, particularly given that you are at a very early stage in your PhD. Without knowing more about your specific circumstances, it is difficult to ...


0

Take into account that your first couple of sentences will mainly be useful as a way for people to get attuned to your voice. Start with a slide with your topic, your name, your affiliation, and any acknowledgments you might have. Next you might want to have something that functions as an outline of what's to come, in very broad terms. A lot depends on ...


0

It's best to give a brief introduction as others mentioned, but I don't think there is a right or wrong structure. I have been to conferences where high ranking officers (we're talking one and two-stars in the US military) would use lot of humor and interesting graphics in their presentations. They were knowledgeable AND were at ease with the audience, as ...


2

I would still briefly introduce myself - it is IMHO simply disrespectful to an audience not to do that. As for the very first minutes of presentation, I suggest starting with some fascinating and/or little-known facts (or mysteries) about your topic (i.e., "did you know squirrels can do (have) ..."). That should grab your audience's attention. Now, to keep ...


7

It depends on where you're presenting and who you're presenting to. If this seminar/conference/class has a moderator who introduces you, then you don't need to introduce yourself. Typically, this will be the case, instead of them just sending you on stage without an introduction. Either way, begin your presentation with a motivating example, which might ...


1

Figure out which part of the concept is absolutely essential to the rest of your presentation. This should be less than the five key points: if you can distill it to one or two sentences, that'd be perfect. Make this part of your presentation overlap with the next part: instead of explaining the concept completely by itself and then moving on to your ...


2

I recommend short simple words no matter how complex the audience is. Just highlight main points of what is being said per slide. I don't recommend quotes on a slide though especially if it requires inhaling to read. If you need hard data shown, I recommend bringing a printout and handing it out. Be sure to include your name/contact info at the last slide. ...



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