New answers tagged

4

My opinion is that you should give the talk. 1. You've made a commitment to the organizer. Keep it. 2. It will be great experience for you. 3. As others have pointed out, it's ok to let the audience know the research isn't finished or as you envisioned. Share that. They understand. 4. Be open to finding help and/or connections among the extraordinary ...


0

While it is not impossible to give a beautiful talk on unfinished research, I personally feel acquiring such qualities is NOT a natures' gift. You need to have a lot of experience and in-depth understanding to give such a talk. If you DO have all such qualities, you should GO AHEAD. Otherwise, ending up with a sloppy presentation will let your audience ...


19

I would encourage you to reconsider your premise. In many cases it is possible to give an excellent, polished talk on unfinished research. This would be appropriate and welcomed by the audiences at many (not all) conferences. As others have suggested, I think it is worth contacting the session organizer. If you do proceed, I would spend most of your time ...


55

When this happens to me, I just describe it as "work in progress" or a "research attempt" and present what I can with what I've got. What's wrong with that? That's how research works. "...hasn't panned out like I hoped it would when I accepted the talk." You can say this during your talk, and explain why it didn't pan out, and ask the audience if they ...


25

Perhaps you could try option 3: send your colleague the slide deck of your presentation, or a detailed summary, and ask him whether he thinks it would be "good enough." Obviously, you wouldn't just drop this on your colleagues lap; you would explain your situation, much like what you have explained here, and see what he thinks. I have no idea whether this ...


14

I agree that you should cancel the talk, for pretty much the reasoning that you explained, except that I think you are overestimating the extent to which canceling the talk will make you look bad to the session organizer. And I don't think you need to apologize "profusely" (although an ordinary apology is certainly in order). As you said, things simply ...


6

I doubt that you showing or not showing the slide will make much of a difference one way or the other, but as a general rule, if I were one of the professors at your defense, I would not expect or want you to say or display anything that makes it seem like you are trying to ingratiate yourself with me in any way other than by performing well and conducting ...


1

Depending on your locale It is fine Although I doubt it will make any impact on your defence per se, it might give a positive outlook. There doesn't seem to be anything negative about it.


1

There is not much that you can explain in two minutes; therefore, the key is to choose a topic that you can do justice to in such a short time. Choose a topic that you are interested in and confident about. Additionally, make sure that the topic is relevant to the course you are applying for. Create an interesting PowerPoint presentation of 4-5 slides. Check ...


0

First of all congratulations on receiving an interview for a master's program. As part of your application, "you are requested to give a 2 minute presentation about a topic of your own choice." Since your question is quite broad "What do you guys advice me to do?", the best answer possible is to stick to the fundamentals of a good speech and be sure to give ...


0

Keynote; A theme by an authority person with credentials on topic and knoledge of participants and their reason for being here. Speaker offers challenges. Plenary; Speaker/ Facilitator with authority remarks to stimulate input and discussion by all to come to conclusion for action.


0

More than anything, that would be unnecessary- possibly ineffective. Instead, you could go with power-point smart art graphics, or even try infographics to visually present your ideas.


0

In my experience, it all depends on the seniority of the people in your audience. The more senior they are, the more they'll appreciate a low-level presentation. Have a look at the sort of presentation McKinseys give to techy middle managers, and the thing they present to the Board. The former might be quite technical. The latter often looks like something ...


4

Doing something a lot different like this would be similar to performing a circus stunt. If you pull it off right, it could make a great impression. If you mess it up, it can be a big mishap. If you are really in to this idea, I would suggest balancing both cartoons and technical diagrams. After all, your cartoons would only help in drawing attention and it ...


5

In general, the person talking to your slides should be you, not a cartoon character. Now, I've seen things like this work for people who are very good presenters and stage performers as well. For example, one of my grad school compatriots was also a serious performing storyteller, and he understood the performance aspect well enough to do all sorts of ...



Top 50 recent answers are included