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6

I doubt that you showing or not showing the slide will make much of a difference one way or the other, but as a general rule, if I were one of the professors at your defense, I would not expect or want you to say or display anything that makes it seem like you are trying to ingratiate yourself with me in any way other than by performing well and conducting ...


1

Depending on your locale It is fine Although I doubt it will make any impact on your defence per se, it might give a positive outlook. There doesn't seem to be anything negative about it.


1

There is not much that you can explain in two minutes; therefore, the key is to choose a topic that you can do justice to in such a short time. Choose a topic that you are interested in and confident about. Additionally, make sure that the topic is relevant to the course you are applying for. Create an interesting PowerPoint presentation of 4-5 slides. Check ...


0

First of all congratulations on receiving an interview for a master's program. As part of your application, "you are requested to give a 2 minute presentation about a topic of your own choice." Since your question is quite broad "What do you guys advice me to do?", the best answer possible is to stick to the fundamentals of a good speech and be sure to give ...


0

Keynote; A theme by an authority person with credentials on topic and knoledge of participants and their reason for being here. Speaker offers challenges. Plenary; Speaker/ Facilitator with authority remarks to stimulate input and discussion by all to come to conclusion for action.


0

More than anything, that would be unnecessary- possibly ineffective. Instead, you could go with power-point smart art graphics, or even try infographics to visually present your ideas.


0

In my experience, it all depends on the seniority of the people in your audience. The more senior they are, the more they'll appreciate a low-level presentation. Have a look at the sort of presentation McKinseys give to techy middle managers, and the thing they present to the Board. The former might be quite technical. The latter often looks like something ...


4

Doing something a lot different like this would be similar to performing a circus stunt. If you pull it off right, it could make a great impression. If you mess it up, it can be a big mishap. If you are really in to this idea, I would suggest balancing both cartoons and technical diagrams. After all, your cartoons would only help in drawing attention and it ...


5

In general, the person talking to your slides should be you, not a cartoon character. Now, I've seen things like this work for people who are very good presenters and stage performers as well. For example, one of my grad school compatriots was also a serious performing storyteller, and he understood the performance aspect well enough to do all sorts of ...


1

What are you doing and why would you spend months of your life doing it. If you are studying microorganisms found in the Baltic sea: why is the Baltic special? Why are the microorganisms interesting? What kind of information, in very broad terms, can they tell you? If you introduce a new algorithm to process some data: what was the problem with the ...


6

I've heard the following advice: When the people in the audience see somebody they don't know, they'll be asking themselves "What kind of guy is this?" for at least some minutes. I guess anybody does this, mainly subconscious. This implies that it is harder to convey technical information in the first minutes, since people work subconsciously to find out who ...


4

My introduction words are: Hello, I am < My Name >. I am going to present our current research on < Paper Name >. Before I start, I must remember to thank my coauthors < Coauthor names >; and also acknowledge the support of < Funding Org Names > If the chair has already said my name, and the paper title, then I would be skipping the first ...


1

I plan on contacting my university about it, but I just wanted to know beforehand if this behavior really isn't normal. Is it "normal?" Well professors can be egotistical and pull all sorts of shenanigans (just like any other group of people). So perhaps normal in the sense that situations like this are not uncommon. But the professors actions, as ...


1

While other answers have given what I also consider the morally/ethically correct answer, that does not help you much. You can bask in the warm glow of being in the right, it won't get you forward in life. Question is: What will? You mentioned "circumstances" prevent you from presenting the paper. Try changing them. I mean seriously try. If it costs you ...


0

"Fake it 'til you make it" may do good work here. Observe people who are cool as cucumbers faced with this situation. (Do not omit your instructors, many of whom have dealt with question barrages -- occasionally hostile ones, at that -- for years or even decades.) See if you can work out useful verbal or postural techniques they use to manage the questions. ...


0

As you are a student, it is not a shame to say that you don't know the answer According to my experience, it is always better to say the truth rather than saying something wrong that could put you in a more difficult situation. Probably, when you say something wrong, you will feel that you say something wrong and this will probably increase more your ...


11

Contrary to the other answers, in theoretical Computer Science, it is customary to list authors in alphabetical order, not by contribution (so what applies to you depends on what exact field you're in). That said, it is possible to deviate from this (for instance, placing the student as first author when they did an overwhelming majority of the work) but who ...


1

The answer is: crowd control. You have to establish yourself as in-control forthright. This can be difficult to do, but it is important to establish that YOU are in control. The first time someone blurts out a question, just say: 'i have a lot to get through, we can take questions later'. Most likely the audience will comply. As for difficult questions ...


0

I agree with practice, but it may be better to start in a more comfortable environment. Form a practice talk group with some of your fellow students. Give each talk to the group before it is due for presentation to the whole class. You can begin by only asking each other easy questions, and not too many, then gradually work up.


4

In this situation, you're a presenter and you're getting bombarded with questions, is this right? Are people incessantly asking questions and not letting you answer, or do you just feel this way because you shut down in front of the audience? First, relax, because as the presenter, you have the floor, and you should thus be in control of the room. This ...


0

This sort of thing improves with practice. That is why you were assigned to do it. Keep doing it and it will get better.


4

The paper was accepted with this order, no matter who was about to present it. Unethical behavior in line from the supervisor. In some cases, conferences and journals won't accept a change in order after accepted. The question is: how important is it for you, is it possible for you to resist? The first thing to check is whether the conference forbids ...


25

No, certainly it is not okay to change order of authorship reflecting levels of contribution to a paper, because of not contributing to its presentation. You should ask very politely your advisor about this sensitive issue. (Try smiling.)


143

Who presents a work should not affect its authorship. Authorship is determined by the contribution to the publication. That work is complete at the time when the publication is accepted and the camera-ready is submitted. Now, it is entirely reasonable (and in fact common) for a paper to be presented by somebody other than the first author, and it's quite ...


1

If you are specifically interested in getting your research out there and tracking who looks at your research, I suggest ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net ResearchGate is generally for developing a research profile for yourself based on your publications and communication with other researchers. But recently I have noticed people uploading ...


3

My committee members all showed up to my defense with the printed copies of my thesis that I had left for them for their comments, so if we needed to look something up, there were 5 hardcopies already in the room. It's fine.


9

While I agree that it would be OK to open a pdf of the thesis to show a specific part as an answer to a question I would like to add: Opening up the thesis and show something in addition to the slides in the middle of the talk would show that the talk was not well prepared. So don't do that and prepare your talk such that this will not be necessary. Having ...


4

If you are in mathematics, there is no notion of "first author", so you can ignore alphabetization. You can put your own name on the first slide as you normally would, and then elsewhere on the slide add "Joint work with XXXX." Here's an example from a slide talk I gave:


1

In my own field, the person who had done most of the work (including probably having the idea, doing some analysis, and writing the paper) would safely be the first author. The person presenting the work could be any of the authors (but preferably it would be the first author), and normally their name would be __ underlined __ on the title slide. In some ...


7

A common way to address this kind of problems is to highlight on the title slide who is the speaker among the authors (e.g., by underlining, bolding or by assigning a different colour). For instance, you can write the list of authors as A. Boss, H. Student


0

You can discuss this with your advisor first, however in many fields, the advisor name goes as is the last name (by default not by contribution percentages). Also, since you are the student (you need to identify that when you start presenting yourself), you can still go first (in my field [civil engineering] it is common for students to go first as it is a ...


0

I have often seen researchers at conferences taking pictures during talks. In my field (astrophysics) people often show complicated graphs and equations. If their work is not already published some people like to take photos of the slides to help them understand the work and discuss it with the speaker later. Most of the conferences I've been to will ask ...


6

I have seen it done many times, sometimes I would see people recording entire sessions on video. My guess is these are people coming from institutions that cannot afford to send many researchers abroad and the one person sent will pass the material to their colleagues in their home country. Some conferences explicitly forbid recording presented material. ...


5

Your observation is right in general (but note that the situation may be a bit different if some big-shot gives a plenary - people may take pictures or may even ask for autograms). If the conference does not have an official policy, I would suggest to try to ask the speaker beforehand. However, as explained in the comments, speakers usually are happy to ...


6

While I am not aware of field-specific differences, my personal experience leads me to believe that landscape is likely to be better for conveying information than portrait. The reasons for this are: People are much more visually sensitive to vertical than horizontal changes in position, due to the fact that we are largely surface-dwellers. You'll have a ...



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