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4

The talk is yours. Put e.g. a slide at the start listing the people who worked on this, stating that you are reporting preliminary results.


16

In a talk you report on work done, not (directly) on the contents of a paper. Since Z was involved in the work you are reporting on in a way that you find significant, you should certainly mention him. When you are giving the talk it will not be (sorry to say) strictly guaranteed that there will ever be a submittable paper at all, and it is certainly not ...


26

Z's name, I am sure, will be on the paper as an acknowledgement at least, even if not as an author. With that in mind, you could probably quite comfortably put Z's name up as a contributor without worrying about misleading the audience. In some fields, this is made easier by a tradition of having an acknowledgements slide rather than putting up multiple ...


0

It might be easier for you to escape from the pages of your thesis if you storyboard your talk initially. In other words, start by choosing and inserting images, and then add text frugally.


-3

In my view, impact of the quality of a presentation in a conference, is relative. There are many factors that model "perception" of "quality". It draws down to the researcher or presenter. If we assume the audience understand the topic under discussion. Generally, the presenter models the impacts that a presentation will have, meaning the concept "impact of ...


3

Note that the following approach may not work for every topic and field. Find out what prerequisites you can expect from your audience or how generally understandable your talk shall be. For example a guideline at my department is that a defense shall be directed at somebody who studied the same field (but did not necessarily specialise on the same ...


1

Two basic rules for presentations: Think about who you are talking to, and plan top down. Look at the convention in your university and your discipline and the time constraints imposed by the rules to decide how much time you want to give the different strata in your audience. There is general public, general scientists, scientists from your general area ...


9

First of all, I think that in your particular case, it was a right course of action to reject the "invitation". To answer the general question Would it be inappropriate for someone to present a paper, for the reasons listed above? let's look at the single reasons one by one: Not my expertise A somewhat valid point. You probably shouldn't be ...


8

You have to cut down brutally. You will have a half hour or so to show the work of a year or more, that is hard. Explain what this is all about. A short introduction/reminder (depending on your audience!) is probably needed. State your objectives clearly. One slide for this should be enough. Summarize your main results. You won't be able to cover ...


14

In the following, when talking about displaying a presentation with a certain aspect ratio on a projector with a certain aspect ratio, I always assume that the presentationā€™s aspect ratio is preserved and black bars are added at the appropriate sides. Never have the projector digitally warp your presentation: It destroys hintingĀ¹ and may make fine lines ...


1

The mindset I have while teaching: if my students are bored during the class, it is me who is boring. It is my fault, so there is no point in getting upset with them. The same applies if people are sleeping: either I am boring them, or they are taking medication that makes them drowsy: either way, it is not their fault, and it is probably mine. The same ...


3

I will add one more option that I don't see mentioned before. It need not work for everybody but it works for me in cases when acoustics is a part of the problem. Sometimes (often) it happens that the room sounds muggy, microphone is missing or working badly etc. In that case, you can simply make the couple steps towards the person, ask him to ...


5

As a speaker, your job is to speak. It's the hosts (or moderator's) job to make the environment welcoming for the speaker. If you want the audience to behave a certain way, talk to the host/moderator and ask them to mention and enforce it. Nobody has the job of demanding an audience's attention or respect. It's pretty normal for people to sit through a ...


0

You can mention that you are a non-native speaker of English. Being a non-native speaker of English myself I face the same problem too sometimes and I use these polite expressions when I have not heard or understood what has been said: Could you please repeat that? Repeat that please. I beg your pardon. Come again. Sorry (etc.)


1

paul garret makes good point in a comment that I think deserves its own answer. If it is a regular thing, some ground rules may make sense: do not talk too long, take open-ended questions offline, do not take calls while attending, and -- maybe -- do not use electronic devices while somebody gives a talk. Assuming there is a host for this seminar, i.e. the ...


8

Is it OK to ask for a repetition? Yes, not only it is okay but also it is necessary. You are the presenter. You are responsible for answering the questions from the audience. If you don't understand the question, how do you answer it? What is the proper way to behave for the non-native speaking presenter? This depends on the situation. In my ...


3

There is nothing wrong with politely asking for a repeat of the question. Your particular reason (learning the language) is an excellent reason for asking, but that's actually irrelevant, because politeness does not require you to explain why you are asking for a repeat (although if you asked them more than once, it might!) In fact, your asking them to ...


58

As with the other answers, I will echo that it's OK to not understand and to ask for somebody to repeat themselves. Even as a native speaker I often have a hard time understanding a question. Sometimes, though, it's not because the question's hard to hear, but because the reasoning behind it is odd or because the question is just not coherent to begin ...


8

If I don't understand the question, I ask politely for a repeat. If I still don't understand (either language or content wise) I usually suggest that we can discuss the matter after the talk and I go on with my talk or dealing with other questions. The only time this not worked well was once where the person was pointing a typo in my slide, and I couldn't ...


2

It is OK to acknowledge you don't always hear or understand what is being asked. I often request a question be repeated or even rephrased.


94

Yes, it is appropriate to ask the questioner to repeat the question, prefaced by: "I'm sorry but I didn't understand the question. Can you repeat it or rephrase it?" If you still don't understand it, you might ask someone else in the audience to restate it or rephrase it. Some people at academic conferences are not good at asking clear, direct ...


21

I have never come across somebody who seemed to be using difficult expressions just to confuse a non-native speaker. When people talk to you in complicated English, it's because they haven't realised you might not understand, and that is quite likely because your own English is good enough that they forget you don't speak the language perfectly. Just say ...


-3

It's a rough matter, in my opinion. And I have plenty of opinion; see Technonomicon for one tiny slice. One way-heavy-handed thing you should not say (perhaps a commenter may have a better idea) is to say: "I've worked hard on all this presentation to give you my best, and I can't give you my best if your attention is split between me and a smartphone. So ...


5

It is somewhat rude and distracting to sit in the front row and obviously not pay attention. But tough luck. You're not a school teacher so you don't have the right to demand your audience's attention. Focus on the audience members who are paying attention to what you have to say: that will help you avoid the distractions, at the same time as directing your ...


5

For me, the main problem would be the distraction. There is a technique used by some really good high school teachers. Move around a bit while you are lecturing, spending just a little extra time in the zone near the distracting individual. The additional proximity for a few moments will probably make the offending character(s) a little self-conscious and ...


3

The vast majority of the people attending a seminar that is held regularly (e.g. every week on a fixed time) will do so on a routine basis. They may sometimes be very interested in the subject and on some other occasions they may be less interested. For some older professors this is their regular nap time.


17

To echo some of the other answers and comments that suggest just trying to "get over it": the pre-cell-phone/internet version of this was senior faculty reading their mail: noisily ripping open envelopes, sometimes large manila envelopes with preprints sent (by physical mail), but invariably dozens of envelopes ripped open. Much noisier than looking at cell ...


48

My attitude to life is to spare my mental capacities to things I can affect and change. Yes, it is annoying to see people at a workshop not paying attention. No, there is nothing I can do in the moment that would (i) change their behavior, while (ii) not make me look petty. So, disengage from these feelings. Focus on those members of your audience who pay ...


3

You probably can't do much about them, unless their behaviour is so gross that you can get away with a "reverse heckle" from you to the audience. (E.g. "The next lemma is so obvious that you should be able prove it while playing a game on your iPad, so I'll press on...") Best to practice that at your local stand-up comedy club first, though ;) I guess you ...


61

I'll offer a dissenting point of view. I often use my mobile device (smartphone, laptop, whatever) during a talk - because I'm taking notes on it! I used to write my notes on paper, then transcribe them to my giant brain dump TXT file (very easy to search through, which is why scanning is not a solution)... until I noticed that I always put off the ...


45

If you are presenting a topic and the audience do not take advantage of your experience and knowledge, it is their loss and not yours. However, two things came to my mind about this topic: Make Your Presentation More Interactive: I'm not saying to bring big amplifiers and blast music and throw free t-shirts at the crowd, however you can engage the ...


19

I agree that their behavior was very rude, and it is best keep looking at smart phones or laptops during a talk to the absolute minimum. Having said that, I think that anything else than what you have done (trying to ignore their behavior) will be very unlikely to have any positive outcome for you. If you would address their behavior, even in the politest ...


1

I was recently invited to speak at a conference. The "invitation" included a one day registration to the conference - only the day on which I gave my talk (otherwise I would not have been able to get into the building, I suppose). As it happens, I needed to be elsewhere for the rest of the week, so I did not mind terribly. But it does suggest that conference ...


0

Well, there are situations when it is almost a "must." In a country which must be nameless, all conference presenters are usually presented with a certificate each to prove that each of them really presents a paper. The reason? All academic jobs in that country have compulsory requirements of conference presentations to keep the job; as far as I remember, ...


19

Well, "should" is a thing, "have to" is another. Let's assume you ask the latter: the answer is No. It's up to you how much time you want to spend at the conference. Your registration can usually be done every morning of the conference and you are free to decide to which session/presentation you want to go. The opening ceremony is always optional and it's ...


27

A conference is so much more than just an arbitrary concatenation of presentations. It is a place you can meet researchers from different places who usually work in a similar field to yours. You can use the time to get to know new people, get to talk about new ideas, find out what others are currently doing in your field, and much more. Therefore, if you ...


5

Have a look at the copyright transfer document that you have signed. Typically, it will only transfer the copyright of the conference paper that has been included in the proceedings. That means that you or your university / institution remain the copyright owner of the slides. Be careful, though. Often the slides contain figures that are also included in he ...



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