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0

The first thing that came to mind after reading your posting was this assumption: unless this abstract contained new and unique information which was generated by your mind, then essentially everything contained in the abstract YOU obtained elsewhere as well. All you did was assemble it. So, I'd just let it go and get on with YOUR life instead of trying to ...


1

You can adapt the order of your talk, putting the boring details towards the end. So, you briefly state your simulation, show the cool results (and why should we care about your simulation at all), and then, once you have hopefully convinced your audience that what you did was meritful and worth paying attention to, explain the details of the choice of ...


3

In your talk, every slide tells a story. That story can be as short or as long as you want. Just like the overview slide tells the story of the whole talk in a single slide, each section of the talk and even each individual slide can be presented at multiple levels of resolution. Familiarize yourself with the story you want to tell at these multiple ...


20

I think there are basically two cases here: The student is presenting or leading discussion on your work as part of a "journal club" sort of series, and the abstract is your abstract because they're talking about your paper. The student is baldly and ridiculously plagiarizing. I think a good way to approach this is to assume case #1, and make contact ...


6

I think the overview slide is the most important slide in the talk. I like to use my overview slide to encapsulate the whole talk in a single diagram. A heuristic that I find holds true is that in a good <1 hour talk, you can say one idea: that idea might have a lot of different elements and side points as part of its explanation, but it all really ...


3

I often skip the overview slide in short talks. Instead, after giving motivation I simply say what the talk it is about: This talk will introduce you to Nutella, analyze its deliciousness, and compare it to peanut butter. Finally, we will talk about Nutella extensions - chunky Nutella, with chopped hazelnut. In general, the overview slide allows the ...


3

I generally agree with the sentiments already mentioned (that is, avoid putting full citations on individual slides; there is usually a better way to handle it). That said, I occasionally find myself wanting to do so for some reason, such as when I'm likely to reuse the presentation a year from now, and want to easily recall where the quoted information came ...


2

Don't put a full citation on the slide. That's too busy and distracting. It will distract some members of the audience from your main message. Personally, I recommend against putting citations on the slide at all, in most circumstances. Many people adopt a text-heavy style, where their presentations are full of text and bullet lists with text and text ...


10

I would strongly recommend against putting the full citation at the bottom of the slide. The problem is, when you are actually presenting, it will both a) make the slide look very busy as you note, and b) distract people away from the rest of the slide. Another problem is that few people will actually be able to copy down the citation (unless you linger on ...


4

My preferred way to do this is to put a short reference on the slide, perhaps not even a formatted citation (e.g. "Liu, et al. show that ..."), maybe use a numeric cite (e.g. "...[1]"), and then have a slide or two at the end listing your citations, in full form, as taken from the paper that the talk represents or will represent if the talk is discussing a ...


2

Why not schedule some of them? Put up a weekly schedule of lectures based on what the students are working on. You could even brainstorm with the students on what they'd like to hear. Also, do they have preference on when they would prefer lectures? First thing in the morning, just before lunch, not after lunch (too sleepy), etc.


3

I don't enjoy lecturing either and yet my student reviews ask for more lectures even if I prefer discussion. What I've done for some classes is prepare a portfolio of 15 minute mini-lectures that are on one specific point, targeted, succint, and within the attention span (maybe) of 18 year olds. You might also want to create a similar grab bag of canned ...


1

The subject of course depends on the sentence, and in math either type of sentence is fine. If the subject is who is talking, use first person singular (you do not need to use the royal "we"). If the subject is who did the work, use the plural. Often I will vary the sentence structure so both "I" and "we" appear in the abstract. Of course, you should ...


0

In general, I agree with jakebeal for the reason he gave. However, one of my colleagues was recently criticized for not using "I" in an abstract he submitted for a postdoc position. Apparently, some people like to see "I" as a way of differentiating between what was contributed by the person vs. what was done as a group (e.g., "I built the apparatus. We ...


5

Use "we", because although only one person will be giving the talk, you are representing the work of multiple people.


2

A thesis defense is really a type of oral examination, and your advisor and committee are the examiners. They can ask questions whenever they want! And it would behoove you to answer them as best you can. As such, it would be wise to prepare your talk with some flexibility, so that even if some time is taken up by questions you can still talk about ...


3

Do's and don't of a thesis defense is hard to answer, but you seem to have two specific questions. Questions during or after: Adding to Koldito (and I've just seen that Szabolcs also mentioned it), what are the regulations of your defense? My defense was highly regulated -- 30 minutes presentation, 30-45 minutes (or an hour? no idea anymore) for discussion. ...


9

The following is written from my perspective and it reflects my biases. If someone feels the need to ask a question during your presentation, chances are it is because you failed to explain something properly and they don't want to get lost. I, for one, hate it when a speaker just barrels through difficult material and I have to struggle to keep up (one ...


0

This is the sort of situation in which I highly recommend animations. Rather than just showing the whole diagram (which will typically be quite complex) and trying to direct the audience's attention as you explain, you can physically direct their attention by the messages move as you talk about each one, creating the diagram as they go. The eyes and the ...


0

If your audience cannot be expected to be fully familiar with timing diagrams, begin by explaining what they are - a lot of software people are unfamiliar with them. I suggest alternating between showing the complete diagram for context and showing an expanded view of a portion of it. The expanded portion will be easier to read, and will call attention to ...


2

Follow the requirements of the journal, if they are firm. But let me argue why you should include all the authors, if possible, in many circumstances, even if there are three or four (or more). In particular, I come from a mathematics background, but this applies to many fields. When you cite a paper as "X et al.,", the other author names are invisible. ...


3

While in publications, you should follow whatever the official style is, in presentations you are typically much less constrained. My own guiding principle for slides is to minimize the amount of visual clutter on screen, and especially to minimize text---after all, I want people to be listening to the talk, rather than simply reading the slides. What's ...


14

This was addressed on English.SE, Is "et al." acceptable for citations with exactly two authors? The answers there indicate that major citation styles (MLA, Harvard) do not use "et al." when there are only two authors. APA style also does not use "et al." for only two authors. I'm not going to exhaustively check every citation style, but I'm not ...


2

I think you should submit and present if it is chosen. If you don't present it, you take away someone else's chance who needs the break in that conference more than you do. Everything is competitive nowadays. Why to create un necessary competition ?


17

It is somewhat if not outright unethical to submit a paper to a conference with peer review with the intention of not attending and presenting. The program committee and reviewers will have to put in volunteer effort to deal with your paper only to have you withdraw it or simply fail to attend. You should not do this.


18

In many conferences, the work has to be presented in order to be included in the conference proceedings and considered published otherwise a submission, even if accepted, will be removed. If you really want to have the paper in a conference you can submit it to one that a friend or colleague is attending and he can present your work for you. It is not an ...


5

Another route to consider would be journal publication. You can poke around some of their sites to find the submission requirements and to see whether their journal sounds compatible with your work. Checking with a few other conference FAQs, it seems that if you are accepted, they will ask whether you would like to present. I'm not sure what that will get ...


1

It is better to finish early than late (if they would let you). Do not try to say too much. Then try to be informal, to give a feeling and intuitive understanding for what you are doing. If you include an equation, you probably want to explain it informally. It is often unlikely that most people will follow details that are too technical. Part, or all, of ...


2

I think there are two points of view in regards to talks related to a job search. The first is everything associated with the search should be lumped together, and if listed on your CV, it would be under something like "positions interviewed for". On my full CV, which I use for keeping track of my activities, I group positions interviewed for into off-campus ...


4

There is no need to overthink this. Every job talk I've ever given or attended was described either as a seminar (say, a geometry seminar) or a colloquium. List it on your cv like that. There are many job talks on my cv (see my webpage), but they are indistinguishable from the rest.


7

Is that appropriate for inclusion on the CV as an invited talk? Yes. If someone invited you to give a talk, then it's an invited talk. It is perfectly appropriate to list it on your CV as such.


2

Here is a possible rule of thumb: if they list your talk on the web page for the seminar series (in the list of talks given that semester), then you should not feel bad at all about listing it on your own C.V. Personally, I would view any talk that you are invited to give that is "open the public in the way a normal talk is" to be an invited talk. But I do ...


4

I would like to second both xLeitix and Koldito's comments and convert them into an answer: In most cases, there is no requirement, and you can just say, "Good [morning/afternoon], my name is [name], and welcome to my thesis defense." A very few institutions have a much more formal set of requirements. For example, when I was an examiner for a defense at ...


3

The answer lie in the comments to your question. Check your local customs. Have you not attended a single PhD talk during your time as a PhD student? What have students done so far? And ... talk to your advisor. Do not overdo it. If you try to work in lots of complex thanks and courteous comments, you are very likely to stumble and forget and the ...


3

Ideally, you would already have attended similar defenses of your advisor's earlier Ph.D. students before and picked up the prevailing social norms there - also concerning other "soft factors", like whether to feed everyone afterwards, with what etc. I gather this didn't happen, so I'll second Koldito's comment-answer: just ask your advisor. And/or talk to ...



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