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7

The IEEE policy on non-presented papers is as follows: Authors are expected to attend the conference in person to present their papers and share their ideas. To encourage attendance, IEEE recommends that conferences exclude or limit the distribution of any paper that was not presented at the conference. This policy is not mandatory and only applies ...


2

In general, at least for the better conferences in the computing and information science research area that I find myself working in, if your paper is accepted and at least one author has registered for the conference, then your paper will be included in the conference proceedings and available in the usual archives (ACMDL/IEEEXplore/DBLP etc.) I have done ...


1

I always appreciate when someone cares about their presentation. There are some things that are just inexcusable (e.g., tables that are left aligned on one slide and centered on another), and make you look lazy, so to the extent a consistent template would mitigate those then it can't hurt. My presentations tend to look the same and stand out against my ...


0

What you're describing in your question is called good branding. Branding is a major part of marketing, as it allows companies to craft a particular image for consumers. It's important for brands to be distinguished from one another, and focus on a target audience, which is why you've probably heard of brands such as "Arm & Hammer" and "Oxi Clean", but ...


6

I see pros and cons; which ends up winning out depends on your skill mix. First - designing a good layout takes effort and expertise. Graphics designers study many years to get good at it. Just because tools are provided to make it easy doesn't mean everyone is suddenly a graphical designer. The right blend of colors, fonts, space etc is not an easy thing ...


5

Standardising layouts have three advantages: You can reuse slides across presentation without changing the styling. When you create presentations, you don't need to think about styling; the templates are already set up for you. Creating templates and styling can be delegated to someone with design skills, and everyone else gets to use them. The first ...


1

I'll first discuss the advantages and disadvantages for each of your options on how to handle citations: Ignore them! pro This technique saves time and space. Most often, the citations go unnoticed during talks (and I have been criticized once or twice for showing any citations on the beamer at all). contra You make way for the criticism that you ...


6

Yes. If you're like me you'll never like everything about a standard layout, and you want your tools to disappear as quickly as possible when creating content. Noticing something in your slides that you want to change (bullet type, or title colour, or whatever) is the easiest way to get distracted from doing so. Having a standard layout for your own work ...


10

First of all, I do not think that having a signature layout is any good for its own sake. In most fields, few people (apart from your workgroup) will attend more than one of your talks and even those who will, will likely not notice the consistency of your layout¹ – unless it’s particularly memorable, which is almost certainly not a good thing². And even if ...


10

If you are presenting in a classroom it is an advantage to have same templates because students do not prefer to see a new template each session. But in the conferences the audience is not aware you are always using the same template. The only thing he sees is the content you are presenting. Moreover, some conferences have their own template and all the ...


20

I don't think there's any inherent value in having your own "signature" presentation layout. Generally, you want to keep the focus on the content of your talk. If people are noticing your layout, they are paying less attention to your science. Would you rather stick in their minds as "the speaker with the cool result" or "the speaker with all those weird ...


3

I participated to this kind of interviews, as an applicant as well as a committe member. For the exemple, I will assume that you are applying to a position as a maths teacher. As Dave Clarke mentioned, prepare for the expected audience. If your are expected to teach to maths major in a very good institution, it is not a big problem to show off your skills ...


-4

I am going to start my PhD in the next six months and I am not at the level you are questioning about. But I want to answer your question as a person who has seen many professors in the classes. Different classes, different lecturers with different teaching styles. I can understand which way could make me more interested in the person's lessons and which ...


15

Having done this, I'd advise: Take it really seriously. In places where candidates are judged equally on teaching and research, the model lesson could really make the difference. Strong researchers may neglect it, relying on their publication/citation record. Make sure you prepare for the expected audience (in my case, 1st year students), not the actual ...


0

Switch focus from the hows and whats to the whys and do a top-down break-down from there. Your peers will be able to follow your break-down for longer than laymen, but all will be more interested in what you do.


11

Perhaps the real problem is that you're not describing your research clearly, and at the appropriate level for the person you're talking to. This is a skill that definitely takes practice to get good at. You'll know you're doing it right when the other person asks good questions; that's proof that they are engaged. So I suspect if you focus on being clear ...


15

Try lots of different things. You've tried one thing, and it hasn't worked. Treat it like any other kind of experimental research. Try new things, monitor the results, adjust your approach accordingly. Some things that can work: use specific examples: identify a very specific problem that they can understand, and show how you're trying to address that ...


4

What is the contribution of your paper going to be? It's a review paper, so you're not going to be contributing any new techniques or results. You say you're not an expert so you're not likely to make any deep connections between different areas of the field or between your field and other areas of study or present any great insights about why things are the ...


4

There are two points that can be considered on your question. You work under supervision of your advisor and he is, to some extent, responsible for your progress at this stage of your academic life. If he thinks that the review paper should not be sent by you, it means that based on his assessments, you are not prepared enough for submitting a review ...


6

In 12 minutes, the best you can do for your audience is highlight four to six broad observations or conclusions about the state of research. Here are some questions you might address with your observations: Are the lines of research diverging and multiplying, or converging and consolidating? Has it divided into "factions" or "schools" that define ...


6

In general I agree to what @user46345 and the others said: If you do not have a good question (and no good reason to ask one anyway) it is better to be quiet. However, sometimes it is important to ask a question. Two examples that come to my mind are: You are the discussant of the talk (and you had no opportunity to read the paper before the talk or the ...


4

You don't need to feel pressured to participate in a discussion that you are not familiar with. If it is a subject that you feel strongly about and are familiar with, I am sure a question would come to you; if, OTOH, you are not familiar and were there just because you were invited, and had not time to get acquainted with the subject discussed prior to the ...



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