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15

I am not going to lecture you on the ethicality of taking sick leave to go to a conference. Not that it sounds like a great idea to me, but let's focus on your actual question. How do I politely ask the convenor of my session to hide my name or alter it in some form? Withrawal is not an option. What is the problem with just sending them an email, and ...


4

Yes, you can list this as an invited talk. Even though the first invitation was not to you, the second invitation most certainly was. Here is another way of thinking about it that may make it clear: imagine that rather than inviting your professor, the organizer has simply asked your professor: "Who do you think would be good to invite to my session?" and ...


42

From both an ethical and a practical standpoint, you don't. The ethical reason should be obvious (and has been stated in comments); you are lying to your employer about leave, and asking the conference organisers to be complicit in this (presumably without their knowledge). If you want to take sick time when it's not permitted, that is your risk to take, ...


8

For a public lecture, yes. You are inviting the audience to show their appreciation for the speaker and the effort it takes to address a public audience, and to acknowledge the opportunity afforded them to see and hear the speaker. In turn, when I first start speaking to a public audience -- regardless of whether I get a welcoming round of applause -- I ...


10

"Please welcome our guest ..." and applaud with the crowd. Presumably you have attended to invited speeches before?


6

Common practice is to include all the authors of the publication/research that the presentation is based on, regardless of which authors attend the conference. When in doubt, always include all authors. If you're the only one attending the conference, list yourself as lead/contact author. That's the only difference.


0

As a PhD candidate in my group I was sometimes asked to join a committee that was interviewing a candidate for an open position. For the preparation of the presentation you already got some good tips in the other answers. You are also asking about the intention of this presentation. It is not only about your presentation skills. That is a skill that you ...


5

Definitely don't try to cover everything. This is certainly not expected, and as you noted, is just not possible in a limited amount of time. What they likely would want to see is if you can explain the main points of your research in a succint way. Trying to cover too much will force you to rush trhough the material, making it difficult to follow. You can ...


2

First, you should choose the most significant research project you worked on. This is probably frustrating as you are likely to have done some other stuff you'd like to present, but put it aside. Focus on the selected project, and present it. Do not try to present every detail of it! Aim about one slide per minute, and one idea per slide. Adapt your ...


5

I apologize for the length of my reply, but I think this is a really great question that I discuss with undergraduates and even grad students all the time, and want to use this as an opportunity to share some of my thoughts with you. I completely agree with the points that Fábio Dias made in his answer. However, I want to add one general tip with you that I ...


3

yes! :) When I'm involved in such things, I usually take all into consideration, when applicable. If the prize is decided before the presentations, you can't judge the presentation. Specifically for undergrads, I tend to focus on how the research was conducted rather than on the results obtained. I don't usually expect groundbreaking originality from ...


20

The standard English pronunciation can be found in a dictionary, see, e.g., et al. at MacMillan dictionary. However, during a presentation, instead of reading that abbreviation, it is probably nicer to say something like: "Smith and his/her group/coauthors/colleagues published the paper [...]".


9

I often just say "and others", "and friends", or just "Foo" for "Foo, et al.". People can see on the screen that there are others and refer to your references to see who those others are. No one is misled or confused if you drop the others in what you say aloud.



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