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1

It's hard to match both the readability and aesthetic quality of Beamer presentations by hand. Possible, but hard. Have you considered trying some convenience layer on top of Beamer, like using Pandoc? It has a Beamer output, and several input formats, like Markdown, Org Mode and Textile. Another point to consider is the editor you use to write your ...


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As Stephen Kolassa mentioned, using a writing tablet or scanning notes are both options. However, if you have an tablet (iPad/Android) or touch screen laptop (mostly Windows 8 like the Surface), there are many software options that allow you to create PDF slides by writing directly on the screen with a stylus. Most people I know (myself included) vastly ...


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It's a good idea to try, but I also wanted to add some notes of caution. I've used a couple of methods, the tablet and pen method to write on the screen in real-time. I've done this to annotate existing typeset slides during the class. I've also have handwritten annotations on top of slides which I've scanned and presented as PDFs, and I've also used full ...


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I see essentially two possibilities: Write out your slides on paper, then scan them. Get a Tablet & Pen combination and write directly "to your computer". I don't have experience with hand-writing slides this way, but I recently acquired a Wacom Intuos Pen which you could use for this. It has the additional benefit that you can use it in web ...


1

There is a wide variety of presentation tools with all kinds of features. However, for an academic presentation (I assume that this is what the question implies, otherwise it is off-topic on this site), animated transitions between slides and, for the most part, on a slide are highly recommended against. The main reason is that they significantly distract an ...


2

In the fore-seeable future, in mathematics the critical activity is giving talks, not posters. Thus, practicing giving talks, all the more if your subject has delicate technicalities, is critical. This is not at all any sort of argument against the communication aspects of posters versus talks, but a comment on professional expectations, for better or for ...


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If you feel the need to have a printout just include the ones you are going to use in your presentation and even those I would not give out until after your presentation. You want your audience listening to you and watching your talk related slide not thumbing through printouts of other things you have given them. The non talk slides will be useful if ...


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I think that if you are going to prepare a handout, you might as well add all of the material in the handout, including your backup slides. After all, you've put them in there for a reason, and since you might share them during the talk, you might as well share them in the handout as well.


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The question is very general, but there are very general answers that are always valid: Enjoy: conferences are important social and learning events, try to make the best of it. Enjoy it. There will be time to check your phone and mail later on. Be curious: talk to a lot of people, read a lot of posters, listen to a lot of talks. Be proactive, make a plan ...


0

The best advice I got from my advisor before going to a conference was to prepare and practice several explanations of my research. The explanations should be of different lengths, starting with an elevator pitch.



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