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3

Screenshots are much better than a live demonstration. Too many things can go wrong with a live demonstration: Problems with the Internet connectivity at the conference, at your university, or anywhere between the two points. Servers being down for maintenance. Software crashing unexpectedly. Embarrassing user errors during the presentation. You cannot ...


3

You don't need to include any of the proposed titles in your presentation. They all come across as stilted and affected, and are entirely unnecessary. Instead, if this is a public presentation, treat it as you would any other such presentation: indicate the title of your talk as you normally would have it, and so on. If this is the "private" presentation ...


15

Generally speaking it is totally fine to use or demonstrate publicly (at a conference or elsewhere) some proprietary software. Many presenters use Microsoft Windows along with Microsoft PowerPoint, and nobody ever gets into trouble. That said, if you want to be 100% sure you need to peruse the end-user license agreement (EULA), which is the contract that ...


1

To clarify the resizing issue discussed in the comments: for any length-based system of preparing a document, the concept of "size" is indeed a valid one. If the people who provide official University logos have done their job properly, the logo will be available in postscript and/or PDF formats that have a defined size in centimetres. These original ...


3

I am converting my comment to aeismail's answer as the OP suggested: Logotypes are typically covered by what's known as the graphical profile of organisations like companies, universities and indeed even political parties or NGOs. A graphical profile usually contains things like (but not limited to) color(s), aspect ratio, font(s) and positioning of ...


8

The following is based on general copyright concepts and should apply to any reasonable copyright laws: Any logo is created by somebody, be it a professional graphic-design company or the dean’s nephew, and without further ado this person (or company) holds the copyright to that logo. This mostly means that you cannot do certain things with it (or an ...


10

Most companies/institutions guard their branding very carefully. Many companies spend thousands or even millions on developing a brand language, which includes fonts, colors, and other design elements. I don't know the specifics of the legal ramifications of changing logo colors, but the owners of the logo are sure to be against it.


31

Logos are often trademarked, and therefore you are not free to recolor them according to whatever color scheme your template happens to use. However, many companies and universities do have multiple versions of their logo available, for precisely this reason. You should contact your university's (or organization's) press office (or similar office) to see ...


0

I think it is just presentation style. We have the same in our universities: hey, let's put 3 topics and 5 figures on this slide, so everyone will be impressed! I don't say that everyone should talk like Steve Jobs or the TED presenters, but I believe that presentations should comply some basic rhetoric and design principles.


11

Let me try to answer for the tendency in my own discipline (particle physics) where we have this problem across the board (i.e. universities too). Much like questions and answers on a Stack Exchange site, those slides are expected to form a resource for future investigators. We know there is too much there for anyone to absorb in the meeting, but we also ...


4

My guess is that it's a cousin of the same problem in the armed forces, which has been a problem for two decades. (Note one link is from 2000, the other from 2010.) On another level, the culture of the national laboratories has been trending in a more corporate direction, and many of the presentations that they need to give have limits on the number of ...


8

It depends on your sentence construction. Use the past tense when talking about what Mendel did, since he did it 150 years ago; use the present tense when talking about what the paper says, since the paper still says that now. For example, "Mendel did experiments on pea plants. His paper describes the results."



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