Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

To answer from a slightly different perspective: As somebody watching the presentation, I would like to see the following: A title (if possible, one that reflects what you're actually going to talk about, rather than what you thought you would be talking about a year ago when you submitted the abstract ;-)) The authors' names and affiliations. Make it ...


1

I usually include: Title of talk Name of presenter (me) Names of coauthors Date Name of conference Title of conference session (if applicable) City of conference My institution's name Maybe my institution's logo I don't include the coauthors' affiliations.


1

Should I put all the authors name on the title page? Yes, of course, unless there are tens of authors (common in particle physics: I dunno how they handle it... maybe with a group photograph). You can then highlight the speaker's name. Should I put all the institute names on the first page? Frequently, one puts institutes' logos instead.


0

While it's generally OK to add a personal thought, it's important to be careful with what sort message you add at the end of a talk. What do you want the audience to get from this extra message, and will it conflict with the rest of the talk? Some examples I've seen that worked: A mention of how the science links to some sort of outreach or broader ...


5

I think that writing on the presentation that you'll be looking forward to doing something is somewhat out of place. In addition, it appears that you may be confusing two separate definitions of conclusion. The first is the scientific conclusion, which you have defined. This is, as you've described, the takeaway message from scientific research, i.e. ...


1

This is a very important skill to master, and a pertinent question. You are correct to first start with the description of the axes (also ensure that axis labels are legible on the slide!); this orientates the audience and will help them understand the results. To follow on from this, I could share a couple of tips from my experience. First, make sure you ...


14

One problem people often have when presenting data in graphs and tables is that they often include data that is not relevant. For talks (formal or informal) I really like the process of starting with an empty graph of just the axes and explaining what the axes are and the limits and what they mean. Sometimes I then like to show idealized data from competing ...


3

Just give the references in the shortest possible manner, e.g.: (Smith et al. 2004) There is no need to provide a full list of references anywhere. Such a minimal reference is sufficient for the following purposes: It clearly shows that this particular result is not from your current work. The year of publication helps to clarify the relative timing ...


2

Good answer, in the comments of the question, thank you. I was going to reply with a comment, but this is becoming too long. I think the problem you mention is common to any work that cannot be simply quantified. Formal proofs and even papers are also examples of this and I'm sure people will find many other examples. In short, making some destructive ...


6

I think the underlying problem is that people you work with don't value the same thing as you. In your comments, you are talking about your code to be 'robust' and 'mature', which is a great thing if you're developing a commercial product but might not be given much credit in an academic environment. Look at this thread for the many reasons why it is so: ...


1

Edward Tufte has an essay on "The Cognitive Style of PowerPoint: Piching out corrupts within" (link). As you may expect, it criticizes slide show style in favor of hand outs, speeches and non-bullet listed slides. The essay is not a direct answer to your question but I think it contains relevant points.


5

I have found that the best way to deal with such questions is to know what you are talking about, preferably much better than whoever is asking you. As a junior researcher you may (won't) be an expert in everything in your field but should still know your particular project really well. If you know your project you have probably thought about most of these ...


29

It is important to recognize that this is not happening to you because you are a junior researcher. At every point in your career, somebody will feel (and, distressingly often, openly state) that your work is not good enough, goes into the wrong direction, is not "real" science, tackles the wrong problems, uses the wrong tools, or is in some other way ...


2

One important consideration is whether any of the people who wrote the references are in the audience. It can't hurt to mention them because academics like to have their egos tickled. Of course, this doesn't apply for posters.


3

Here's one that hasn't been mentioned yet: a call to action. My source for this idea is the youtube movie 5 Things Every Presenter Needs To Know About People by Susan Weinschenk. One of the things she mentions is that when you want your audience to do something (like give you money or vote for you), you have to spell it out really explicitly at the end of ...


10

I always include key references (i.e. ones necessary to ground the work in the literature including my own refereed work) in my slides and on my posters. I absolutely consider the references to be important as they ensure appropriate credit for prior work and to demonstrate one's understanding of the current state of the field. I do this in one of two ways ...


12

My rule for presentations is: Don't say anything that an interested member of the audience will not be able to remember. This includes tables, but also bibliographic references to things that are not absolutely central to the presentation. There is a caveat: if the conference is recorded or the slides are available offline, you could write them in a ...


2

There's different schools of thought on that, and I don't think there is any really dominant convention (at least in my field). By and large, for conference papers, I tend to only include citations when it seems particularly important to do so (for instance when citing something in verbatim), or when I want to stress that an opinion that I am presenting ...


5

If you subscribe to the "slides should be teasers to motivate people to read the paper" view (I don't), then make sure you provide full bibliographic information for the paper at least. If the paper is not published yet when you give the presentation, take the time to edit your presentation once the paper is published, if you can still access the ...


3

I've only done one of these. I followed the same rules I'd follow in a paper. If the poster mentioned the work of another, there was a citation in the poster text and a reference at the bottom of the poster. That resulted in ten references (out of about 100) on the poster. ...


9

I'd bet it's probably fine, but there's no way to get a definitive answer without asking the copyright holder (this is one of the weaknesses with the noncommercial Creative Commons licenses). The Creative Commons definition of commercial use is use that is "primarily intended for or directed towards commercial advantage or monetary compensation". Most ...


2

Another alternative is to use a tablet device with a computer projector to hand write notes. This has the advantage of slowing the lecturer down (just like writing on a black board) while being visible to a very large audience and easily recorded by a lecture capture system. I've switched to this approach in recent years and find that students really ...


2

Powerpoint corrupts absolutely ... but you can write slides that help students memorize what is the main point you are talking about. Then I use lot of board space to illustrate what I am saying. I taught once in Sweden and was very happy: there were boards all around the room so I could keep important drawings and assertions still alive and well! (I teach ...


4

It is quite controversial whether slides are better than a board, and I think this also depends very much on what and how you are teaching. But you have asked specifically for advantages, so I will try to focus on those. I will, however, mention caveats. As Shawn says, slides can work as a very nice conceptual map of where you want your lecture to go, ...


4

I teach math - mostly to undergrads. As of late I have started using slides more and more. The reasons (and my rants): Our sciences building is being renovated, so the math department is "temporarily" relocated in social sciences building. Thus we need to use whatever sorry excuses for lecture halls they, the nearby law school, and the adjacent educational ...


3

It is, of course, possible to use slides in good ways and bad ways, just as it is possible to use blackboards/whiteboards in good ways and bad ways. I hardly ever use slides for reasons I document here: http://okasaki.blogspot.com/2008/01/why-i-dont-use-powerpoint-for-teaching.html But you asked for ADVANTAGES of slides. One is for showing pictures. For ...


14

Advantages of using slides: Students get insufficient sleep, and a slideshow presentation allows them to catch up on their sleep hours somewhat. Slides decrease student-teacher interaction, and we are all introverts nowadays, so less interaction is a good thing! Slides make it less likely that a student will take notes in class, thus saving on ink. The ...


2

I use slides when I teach because: It forces me to prepare for class in advance. (This is usually not a problem for me, but I had a professor in undergrad who only wrote on the board because he didn't have a lesson plan or anything prepared for the day. I vowed to never ever teach like that!) I have time to articulate my thoughts on my slides. The ...


5

I teach courses written by other people. Thousands of trainers around the world teach the same courses. Using slides generated by the courseware authors gives us consistency and repeatability. Our courses prepare students for certification exams, so the course content must be consistent. I do, however, also use whiteboards, mostly for scribbled quick ...


3

Not huge, you have more freedom to respond to students responses and questions with board work while slides tend to have a better structure. If the class is looking a little lost it's easy to expand on something on the board but you can't make more slides on the fly. If you do choose board work please do provide handouts or similar with the actual ...


3

From the perspective of a student, I have seen good and bad teachers, irrelevant what method they used (board or slides). However, I never liked boards. You need to copy everything from the board. That is, you concentrate pretty all of your brain time on copying (depending on the teacher's writing speed which is usually quite high). This might be a good ...


16

Advantages of slides over boardwork? Laziness, clean hands, digitally distributable product that represents all the work you didn't actually demonstrate in class. And... those are also the disadvantages. Board work is usually more engaging, and at least the classes I've taken and given, board-based classes kept the students (and the instructor!) mentally ...


10

I use slides as I'm more likely to get the details correct on slides than when I'm trying to explain and write at the same time (e.g., writing out a moderately large matrix example); I much prefer heavy use of figures in explanations, but I can't draw to save my life; I'm often teaching courses on numerical methods, and if I can't show how it could be done ...


9

First of all, let me say that I think that there are lectures that are better taught with slides (e.g. more applied lectures) and lectures that are better taught on the board (e.g. most math lectures). So, what are the advantages of using slides? Why do you use slides? The most common (but imho the worst) reason is probably: because it is easier and ...


22

Slides can be great to force you structure your lectures before class and actually stick to them, and they are always more legible than writing on a board (plus less messy if you have to deal with chalk rather than a whiteboard). That being said, the slides remove some of the dynamism from the course in that they have students think less critically than ...


54

I am a student and I much prefer lecturers who write on the board than the ones who use slides. Profs using slides generally go into loop mode where they have the objective of going through all the slides before the end of the class. As such, profs tend to go in a very fast pace. Writing on the board brings some dynamism to the lectures. The lecturer tends ...


2

My goal when giving a talk is to convey information in a way none have presented or expressed before. The constraints being: easy to understand for complete novices interesting for experts My mindset is also to aim for 10-12 minutes when allocated 15 minutes. It is always better to finish early than it is to go over your time. It ALWAYS leaves a bad ...


0

Normally it is better to use some kind of curve fitting (splines, etc), as we are not assuming that the measurements are absolutely accurate and the connecting lines should go from point to point. However measurement points must also be present and very clearly visible, as they are our results and the line is our hypothesis, interpretation. Ideally showing ...



Top 50 recent answers are included