Hot answers tagged

156

You wrote: Students need the presentations to review Back when I was your age (of course I have no idea of your age but I am guessing you are a traditional undergraduate student), we had to take notes using these two antique tools called pen and paper. I don't think even one of my professors gave me anything, other than pausing so I had time to write ...


143

Who presents a work should not affect its authorship. Authorship is determined by the contribution to the publication. That work is complete at the time when the publication is accepted and the camera-ready is submitted. Now, it is entirely reasonable (and in fact common) for a paper to be presented by somebody other than the first author, and it's quite ...


96

Yes, it is appropriate to ask the questioner to repeat the question, prefaced by: "I'm sorry but I didn't understand the question. Can you repeat it or rephrase it?" If you still don't understand it, you might ask someone else in the audience to restate it or rephrase it. Some people at academic conferences are not good at asking clear, direct ...


94

If somebody asks a dumb question, they're not going to feel good about the interaction whatever happens. If possible, get them back on the right track but avoid saying anything that could be interpreted as sarcasm and move on as quickly as possible. The most likely thing is either that the questioner has missed something obvious or misunderstood something ...


79

I think there are basically two cases here: The student is presenting or leading discussion on your work as part of a "journal club" sort of series, and the abstract is your abstract because they're talking about your paper. The student is baldly and ridiculously plagiarizing. I think a good way to approach this is to assume case #1, and make contact ...


72

Years ago, I transcribed raw film footage to earn a little extra money. These transcriptions had to be verbatim, with all the ums, ahs, stuttering, etc. included. It's surprisingly difficult to do a verbatim transcription, because there is a strong tendency for listeners to hear what is meant, rather than what is actually said. We transcribers had to listen ...


71

I'll offer a dissenting point of view. I often use my mobile device (smartphone, laptop, whatever) during a talk - because I'm taking notes on it! I used to write my notes on paper, then transcribe them to my giant brain dump TXT file (very easy to search through, which is why scanning is not a solution)... until I noticed that I always put off the ...


69

First, some conferences have really strict timing and you will be given no extra time. Second, if there is important slide or two, just do it. But make sure that you only slightly extend your time (e.g. 10%). If you are going to extend it by 50%, or 200% (I saw that, and I was pissed at both the speaker and even more - the chair for allowing that) - please, ...


66

@Patricia asks what happens if a student is not able to take notes and think at the same time. If the student has a disability that prevents note taking (say for example, they are blind or they broke their arm), then in the United States the university will normally provide a note taker (usually another student in the course). The student will of course ...


66

My attitude to life is to spare my mental capacities to things I can affect and change. Yes, it is annoying to see people at a workshop not paying attention. No, there is nothing I can do in the moment that would (i) change their behavior, while (ii) not make me look petty. So, disengage from these feelings. Focus on those members of your audience who pay ...


64

I am a student and I much prefer lecturers who write on the board than the ones who use slides. Profs using slides generally go into loop mode where they have the objective of going through all the slides before the end of the class. As such, profs tend to go in a very fast pace. Writing on the board brings some dynamism to the lectures. The lecturer tends ...


62

Firstly, I should note that the examples you give are certainly somewhat agressively formulated (more so than would be common in my field), but not in themselves invalid questions. It is certainly "allowed" to be critical of the presented work, and there is nothing the session chair can or should do about this. As a speaker, it always helps to think in ...


61

You might be interested in Advanced Google Image Search, where you can search by copyright status. More information about the Usage rights search can be found here. For example, here are freely useable images searching for "Mars". And here is an example searching for "IBM". Note: See the important remark by @jb. in the comment below — you should verify ...


59

It sounds to me like you're asking how to eliminate simple "slip-of-the-tongue" mistakes, which I think is the wrong way to approach this and likely to be counter-productive. Let's instead start with the assumption that sometimes you are going to make these simple mistakes. First, recognize that it's not just you: everybody does. Some people have more or ...


58

As with the other answers, I will echo that it's OK to not understand and to ask for somebody to repeat themselves. Even as a native speaker I often have a hard time understanding a question. Sometimes, though, it's not because the question's hard to hear, but because the reasoning behind it is odd or because the question is just not coherent to begin ...


57

The best way is to be highly active in your field. (Note: this will take work.) Here are my suggestions for accomplishing this, and I hope others will post more in the comments or other answers: Do awesome work. It all starts here. As a PhD student, this typically requires being in an awesome lab under an awesome professor, but it is possible to achieve ...


57

If your paper is accepted is it perfectly appropriate to ask them to observe your religious guidelines. A lot of people will give special date restrictions when presenting in a conference for lesser things like they need to fly home by a certain date, their funding doesn't cover hotels for the length of the conference, or they just don't have a desire to ...


56

Just to put what's already in the comments into an answer: Yes, you should convey the information you've told us to the hiring faculty. If you've gotten a campus interview for a faculty position, they are already extremely interested and satisfied with your on-paper qualifications. Final decisions are often strongly motivated by who they think will take ...


51

As a rule of thumb you should aim your presentation to be finished 2 to 3 minutes before the allotted time. This way, slight delays like the ones you mention (in the sub-1-minute range) should not require you to skip any material or cut into the discussion time. However, even if you do not do this, cutting 30 seconds of discussion seems like the lesser evil ...


51

Human cognition is a strange thing, and I won't pretend I know it well enough to give you a guide, but I will suggest that you simply consider your audience and how you want them to move through the information. A dense, heavy talk with few breaks will tire most audiences. A light talk that doesn't require much thought will result in many people letting ...


50

We are in full agreement that there are in fact dumb (or, more accurately, non-productive) questions, and I do not think that it is your responsibility as a speaker to make the asker of the question feel better about himself to the expense of the rest of the audience. When this sort of thing happens to me, I try to answer accurately, politely and to the ...


47

If you are presenting a topic and the audience do not take advantage of your experience and knowledge, it is their loss and not yours. However, two things came to my mind about this topic: Make Your Presentation More Interactive: I'm not saying to bring big amplifiers and blast music and throw free t-shirts at the crowd, however you can engage the ...


45

I don't object to have fun, but I would object to have fun when you need to be serious. Because when the audience need you to be serious to your talk, then a funny picture will disrupt the thinking and they will be anxious. If your talk in short, then I suggest you to put the comic at the end of the talk. If your talk is long, then I think putting it in the ...


44

From less esoteric to more (I've seen all these things happen): Make sure you know how to "send the image to a projector". Not all laptops do this automatically, and I'm surprised at how many people don't know how to do it. I've also seen people be confused by the mirroring feature on Macs. Verify that there's a power outlet or some place to plug in your ...


43

From both an ethical and a practical standpoint, you don't. The ethical reason should be obvious (and has been stated in comments); you are lying to your employer about leave, and asking the conference organisers to be complicit in this (presumably without their knowledge). If you want to take sick time when it's not permitted, that is your risk to take, ...


42

It is important to recognize that this is not happening to you because you are a junior researcher. At every point in your career, somebody will feel (and, distressingly often, openly state) that your work is not good enough, goes into the wrong direction, is not "real" science, tackles the wrong problems, uses the wrong tools, or is in some other way ...


42

I've seen this before and it can work very well. Your only task in the one minute slot is to convince people that they should come and see your poster. Say what you've been doing and why it's interesting. You could use your abstract as a starting point but don't just read it out. Keep the slide really simple with the paper title and authors and a single, ...


41

Since the OP specifically mentions the case of job talks and none of the other answers do, let me concentrate on that in my answer. 1) In a job talk, unless you specifically know otherwise, you should assume that everyone in the audience is someone who could have a direct hand in hiring you. In the job talk I gave at my current university, a graduate ...


41

As others have noted in the comments, there's a difference between questions that have legitimate content but an unnecessarily aggressive tone (e.g., "Isn't it obvious that won't work for reason X, you fool?"), and questions that are purely verbal attacks with no real substance ("How did you even get accepted to this conference?"). As a speaker, the best ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible