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22

I think this is a false dichotomy. In the US, you are generally expected to be able to teach a course your first semester. You shouldn't need to have the course fully prepared in order to start teaching it, though. You can prepare as you go. Also, many departments in STEM fields back off on their standard teaching load for junior faculty during the first ...


13

A position starting in August almost certainly expects you to immediately teach courses for the academic Fall Term. As a junior/first-year instructor, the courses and their general expected learning outcomes will typically be dictated to you, and you will likely be expected to use whatever textbook and resources were indicated while students registered for ...


9

In general, a CV is not a place for innovation: your choices for what to put on it should be most heavily motivated by whatever is expected and most common in your field and especially among your peers. If you are thinking of doing anything "nonstandard" on a CV you should get a few opinions on it, and in particular show it to your advisor. Is it common ...


8

Personally I would choose the company position: Prior experience in the private sector (outside of teaching) is a big advantage if you decide to look for a non-academic job later. Python is a popular programming tool to use. Might as well learn now. Data analysis is a big part of doing a physics PhD. You will form better contacts (probably). Never ...


4

I think you should not worry too much about the politics as they always exist everywhere and is kind of inevitable. You should try to stay away from the politics as much as possible. If you go for postdoc position then you should focus more on your research meanwhile maintaining friendly relation if not with everyone then at least most of your peers. Also ...


4

When you apply to most positions (except at the very highest tier), you are asked to provide a teaching portfolio. This could include courses that you've taught, syllabuses, teaching evaluations, a statement of your teaching philosophy, etc. When you give a job talk, you may also be asked to give a guest lecture in a class or before undergraduates as a ...


3

1) Did you already get an admission to grad school? I get confused when you say "search for professors". If no, use your time to focus on getting admission first, e.g. improve GRE score, read papers etc etc. Getting an admission may not be as easy as you think. If yes, 30 hours per week to search for a professor is too much. 2) Since you haven't been ...


2

Let me tell you what I told a friend who was struggling with a decision between a great department without people in his area and a good department with people in his area (including collaborators): Go to the better school. They're not in the same league, and you may have a chance in the future to get more people in your area. You can still travel to the ...


2

There's no prohibition in most job postings against people like you applying for postdoc positions. In many cases, it will be rare, though, that someone would be selected who is 8 years past their PhD simply because most people recognize that postdoc positions are supposed to be training positions for people on their way to faculty jobs. That doesn't seem to ...


2

The potential candidates for this kind of high-level positions typically are people that already have a very busy job, and they do not actively search for jobs. It may be that the hiring process is more of the head hunting type rather than the advertisers passively waiting to get many applications and then filtering them. Of course, direct applications are ...


2

In terms of the points you raised concerning publications and research opportunities, it's pretty common for an undergrad not to publish. You ought to publish during your Master's though if you want to continue on to do a PhD, or to keep that option open for the future. If you would like to publish in an academic journal or conference before embarking on ...


2

I think that a Ph.D. program in human-computer interaction (HCI), such as this one, or a Ph.D. program in information systems with HCI specialization would be among the right routes toward your goal. Potentially, depending on what areas you're interested in, a degree, certification, postgraduate program or, even, a set of MOOCs in information architecture or ...


1

You already have two questions there: What should you consider when applying for a position at a different department? What should you consider when accepting a position at a different department? I'll concentrate on the first question here, and maybe you want to repost your second question separately, because it really deserves separate treatment. ...



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