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I wrote my first academic paper recently (it is in math). I need to put a footnote crediting the NSF for funding. I have noticed that papers almost always say "Partially supported by [grant]". I got all of my funding from one grant. Should I still say partially supported? If so, what is the reason for this?

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I've always assumed that the `partially supported' meant that you were also supported by your department in some way. –  Aru Ray Jul 15 at 14:56
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I am an undergrad so I don't get paid by the department. Although I guess I get other resources from them. –  Dylan Stephano-Shachter Jul 15 at 15:36
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Did you use the department's wireless network? Printers? Electricity? Tables? Bathrooms? –  JeffE Jul 16 at 1:31
    
Yes good point. –  Dylan Stephano-Shachter Jul 16 at 14:43

2 Answers 2

The NSF requires the following text (or its equivalent) in publications from work funded by their grants:

"This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. (grantee must enter NSF grant number)."

No need to quantify the level of support.

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Exactly this. Most granting agencies will tell you precisely the grammar to use. –  Jonathan Landrum Jul 15 at 16:51
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Even, unfortunately, if that grammar is wrong (looking at you, National Research Foundation of South Africa). –  Max Jul 16 at 7:34

Some grants come with more strict requirements than others. I am aware of at least one funding body, that requests to specifically explain which part of the work was supported by this grant (and you can not just say "a part"). Others are satisfied if you just mention them. Read the funding agreement and follow their guidelines.

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