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I have an document extending paper [A & B, 2000]

On my work, I make many references to [A & B, 2000], some times several times on the same paragraphs as there is some need to compare both approaches.

How do I make reference to [A & B, 2000] without being redundant?

Example:

 Our work compares with [A & B, 2000] on the following:
  - The approach presented in [A & B, 2000] makes (x) assumption on (...)
  - The (something) differ from those of [A & B, 2000] on (...)
  - Performance of X was not reported by [A & B, 2000]

(there is quite more content in between the references on the actual document, but still look overwhelming)

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In addition to the posted answer you can use ibid. –  Nit Jun 27 at 1:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Check your target journal's style guide or advice to authors, but my approach is to use the citation format the first time I mention it and then just mention the authors by name or pronoun when I refer to them later. E.g:

Our work compares with [A & B, 2000] on the following: - The approach presented by A & B makes (x) assumption on (...) - The (something) differ from those of A & B on (...) - Performance of X was not reported by A & B

Even that can get redundant. You might say say:

Throughout the following section, we compare our work to [A & B, 2000]. In their work, they make assumptions about (X) ... Additionally, (Y) differs between A & B's method and our because ... They also do not present performance of (Z) in their work.

It depends a bit on your own style, but my approach is always a bit more conversational.

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