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Recently, a (Springer) journal invited me to extend a (Springer) conference paper. The conference paper was published in April. After the extensions, I can submit the journal article as post-conference publication.

Regarding my question, should / must I keep the name of the conference article (when writing the journal article)? Or should I modify the name of the journal article?

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What do you mean by 'extension'? It is the same article with more details or it is the previous study + some new calculations or experiment? If it is the second one, then you should definitely change the name pointing out the difference between the conference paper and the new one. If it is the first case then I don't understand the necessity of publishing it again. –  artalexan May 21 at 12:37
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Whatever you do about the title, be sure to make it clear in the journal version that it's based on the conference version. A common way of doing this is to add a phrase such as "A preliminary version of this paper appeared as [cite]" in the front-matter. –  David Richerby May 21 at 14:19
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Ask the editor. –  JeffE May 21 at 16:49
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@artalexan: In some fields such as CS it is not unusual to publish an "extended version" of a conference paper in a journal. The journal article is usually expected to contain some 30% of new content compared to the conference paper, but that new content may primarily consist of more details, for example a more exhaustive formal definition of the concept presented or, say, a complete list of (e.g. novel user interface) elements used when the conference paper had only enough space for a few examples. –  O. R. Mapper May 21 at 18:12
    
@DavidRicherby that's a must have --- already done 2 days ago –  mnemonic May 22 at 13:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

According to the conference website:

The conference proceedings are to be published in the Springer's LNAI (indexed by DBLP, EI, Scopus, and Thomson ISI).

In other words, your conference paper is already published. The journal paper will therefore be a new publication, and as such, you could use a different title, to avoid any confusion (and it will be a different paper, since you have to expand it).

EDIT However, there are precedents, for at least one previous edition of the conference you're mentioning, of authors having the same title in the conference and in a journal edition (taken from DBLP):

  • Peerasak Intarapaiboon, Ekawit Nantajeewarawat, Thanaruk Theeramunkong: Extracting Chemical Reactions from Thai Text for Semantics-Based Information Retrieval. IEICE Transactions 94-D(3): 479-486 (2011)

  • Peerasak Intarapaiboon, Ekawit Nantajeewarawat, Thanaruk Theeramunkong: Extracting Chemical Reactions from Thai Text for Semantics-Based Information Retrieval. ACIIDS (1) 2010: 271-281

  • Yongli Wang, Dongxiao Niu, Ling Ji: Power load forecasting using data mining and knowledge discovery technology. IJIIDS 5(5): 452-467 (2011)

  • Yongli Wang, Dongxiao Niu, Yakun Wang: Power Load Forecasting Using Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery Technology. ACIIDS (1) 2010: 319-328

  • Moamin Ahmed, Mohd Sharifuddin Ahmad, Mohd Zaliman M. Yusoff: A Collaborative Framework for Multiagent Systems. IJATS 3(4): 1-18 (2011)

  • Moamin Ahmed, Mohd Sharifuddin Ahmad, Mohd Zaliman M. Yusoff: A Collaborative Framework for Multiagent Systems. ACIIDS (1) 2010: 329-338

Looking at random references from the journals in question, it seems quite frequent to have the same name for a journal paper and a conference publication the previous year. In other words, I stand corrected, and you might want to keep the same name for the journal version.

As pointed out by DavidRicherby and Mangara, it's likely to be field dependent. Hence, the best approach is probably to look at previous editions of the journals in question, and check if there are matching conference papers.

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This may be very field-dependent. In theoretical computer science, it's expected that the conference and journal versions of a paper will have the same title and this avoids confusion by making the relationship between the two papers clear. –  David Richerby May 21 at 14:16
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@DavidRicherby: As you say in your comment, the link between the two papers should be made explicit in the journal paper in any case. –  userxxxxx May 21 at 14:22
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@DavidRicherby: I updated my answer based on your remark that it might be field depended. –  userxxxxx May 21 at 15:06
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In contrast to the TCS examples, IEEE guidelines specifically say that if publishing an extended conference paper as a journal paper, you should change the title slightly to avoid "confusion" –  ff524 May 21 at 15:07
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@ff524: As far as I can tell, none of the journals indicated by the conference website is published or sponsored by IEEE. Do you know the guidelines for Springer? –  userxxxxx May 21 at 15:11

If the content of the paper is not drastically different from the conference version (same main results, but more details / data), it is perfectly acceptable to use the same title. This is the usual approach in theoretical computer science. Of course, you are free to change the title if you want to.

Examples:

Oswin Aichholzer, Greg Aloupis, Erik D. Demaine, Martin L. Demaine, Sándor P. Fekete, Michael Hoffmann, Anna Lubiw, Jack Snoeyink, and Andrew Winslow, “Covering Folded Shapes”, in Proceedings of the 25th Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry (CCCG 2013), Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, August 8–10, 2013.

Oswin Aichholzer, Greg Aloupis, Erik D. Demaine, Martin L. Demaine, Sándor P. Fekete, Michael Hoffmann, Anna Lubiw, Jack Snoeyink, and Andrew Winslow, “Covering Folded Shapes”, Journal of Computational Geometry, volume 5, number 1, 2014.

Jeff Erickson, and Amir Nayyeri. "Tracing compressed curves in triangulated surfaces." Proceedings of the 2012 Symposium on Computational Geometry. ACM, 2012.

Jeff Erickson, and Amir Nayyeri. "Tracing compressed curves in triangulated surfaces." Discrete & Computational Geometry 49.4 (2013): 823-863.

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I'm not sure there's any need to give examples here: in TCS, almost every journal paper that's based on a conference paper has the same title. –  David Richerby May 21 at 14:18
    
@DavidRicherby You're probably right. I just wanted to offer some facts along with my personal observations. –  Mangara May 21 at 15:13

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